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georgeo76
01-26-2006, 07:57 AM
Why dose the BF 110 require so much rudder input? should it not be stable like the P38?

georgeo76
01-26-2006, 07:57 AM
Why dose the BF 110 require so much rudder input? should it not be stable like the P38?

rnzoli
01-26-2006, 07:58 AM
Are you sure the props are also counter-rotating on the Bf-110?

Jetbuff
01-26-2006, 09:21 AM
Yep, check the rotation direction of the props: They both go in the same direction, no? On the bright side you have rudder trim available.

georgeo76
01-26-2006, 09:54 AM
Thanks. Guess you learn something new everyday. The rudder trim is nice, it was adjusting every six seconds that got me wondering in the first place.

Anyone know if there was a particular reason for this? What was the advantage of having them rotate in the same direction?

rnzoli
01-26-2006, 10:04 AM
We were wondering about this lately, and the best guess was easier manufacturing and maintenance.

WWSensei
01-26-2006, 10:06 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by georgeo76:
Thanks. Guess you learn something new everyday. The rudder trim is nice, it was adjusting every six seconds that got me wondering in the first place.

Anyone know if there was a particular reason for this? What was the advantage of having them rotate in the same direction? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The "advantage" was they could just use engines interchangeably and not worry about "left" or "right". Eases manufacturing as well. Remember, this is the same country that didn't bother putting adjustable in-cockpit rudder trim in thier primary fighters so adding rudder trim to the 110 was an "improvement" for them. I'm betting a few of the designers felt even that was superfluous since a pilot could just hold the rudder. Good for the leg muscles I tell you. ;-)

berg417448
01-26-2006, 10:06 AM
Yeah...most likely easier production and maintenance since you don't have "right" and "left" specific parts.

georgeo76
01-26-2006, 11:02 AM
Sensei, you make it sound like the Germans didn't care for their pilots.

I find German AC to be the most pilot friendly in the game. Just look at the gauges. They are laid out in a logical and ergonomic fashion. They are large and convey necessary information quickly and efficiently. (turn/slip-artificial horizon combo)

Look at the competition. Russian planes barely have gauges at all. US Aircraft have plenty of gauges, but their placement is a mystery. Maybe they did it alphabetically, or by the dewy decimal.

Waldo.Pepper
01-26-2006, 12:40 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">- you make it sound like the Germans didn't care for their pilots. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif Really!? I'm shocked!

Jumoschwanz
01-26-2006, 08:21 PM
If you turned your car engine over backward, the oil pump would pump backward and suck oil out of the parts that needed it, the ignition timing would not fire at the right time, and the camshaft would not open and close the valves at the right time either, plus the water pump would pump bacward plus we need a new prop, and on and on, just to mention a few of the things that would need re-engineered.

Maybe too much for resource-starved war-time Germany?

Jumoschwanz

VW-IceFire
01-26-2006, 08:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by georgeo76:
Thanks. Guess you learn something new everyday. The rudder trim is nice, it was adjusting every six seconds that got me wondering in the first place.

Anyone know if there was a particular reason for this? What was the advantage of having them rotate in the same direction? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Virtually all WWII aircraft with twin engines have them rotating in the same direction. Its just cheaper to make one engine and fit it twice. The P-38 and Lockheed had a more complex tradition...virtually nothing was sacrificed to make the P-38 a world class interceptor. But that meant it was complex to build, complex to maintain, and complex to pilot.

vanjast
01-27-2006, 01:13 AM
If you made/designed the engines isometrically (This is the word I think - hells my Inglish has gone to pot) similar, and had the propshaft end pieces the same on both sides, would not you be able to install the engine normal on one side, then back-to-front on the other to create counter rotating props.

Thus the same engine. Maybe the Mechanical Engineers here might help on this??
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

flakwagen
01-27-2006, 01:53 AM
America was one of a select few countries rich enough to afford luxuries like counter-rotating duel-engined aircraft. Even Britain; when they ordered a few P-38s, ordered them with engines that rotated in the same direction. I assume they did this to simplify logistics, repair, and reduce cost.

As for installing one engine backwards and one forwards.. I suspect that would be an engineering nightmare. And it would still result in the need for a few side-specific parts.

Flak