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View Full Version : Legendary test pilot Scott Crossfiled dies in plane crash



berg417448
04-20-2006, 12:21 PM
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/14387655.htm

PF_Coastie
04-20-2006, 02:35 PM
RIP, At least he died doing what he loved most.

Here is another article:

http://hamptonroads.cox.net/cci/newsnational/national?_...article&id=D8H3U84O1 (http://hamptonroads.cox.net/cci/newsnational/national?_mode=view&_state=maximized&view=article&id=D8H3U84O1)

darkhorizon11
04-20-2006, 02:40 PM
Salute...

I've read stories about this guy since I was 12 and always looked up to all the test pilots. He'll be sorely missed! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

slipBall
04-20-2006, 02:49 PM
Wow 84 year's young, and still up there. I wonder if the crash was health related, fell asleep, or a aircraft malfunction. I suppose time will tell, at least he was doing what he loved

berg417448
04-20-2006, 03:43 PM
Originally posted by slipBall:
Wow 84 year's young, and still up there. I wonder if the crash was health related, fell asleep, or a aircraft malfunction. I suppose time will tell, at least he was doing what he loved

Quite possibly weather related. I live about 50 miles or so from the crash site and at the time he is believed to have crashed there were a lot of thunderstorms in the area.

slipBall
04-20-2006, 04:06 PM
Thunderstorms, that surprise's me, it's a big no, no, for light pilot's to take to the air when they are about, or in the forcast

Chuck_Older
04-20-2006, 04:09 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

p-11.cAce
04-20-2006, 04:30 PM
Don't fall victim to the media hype on this one too much - a Cessna 210 is a seriously capable machine even with just one turning up front. The check haulers that run out of the FBO I used to work at only flew 210's and they plowed through some unbelivable weather to get the job done. 1000nm range at a cruise of 199knots and a 27,000 foot ceiling makes for a pretty rugged a/c. Mr. Crossfield was a hero of mine since childhood and I hope that this accident does not tarnish an unbelivable and unrepeatable career in aviation. Having lost friends to flying accidents I never really buy into the notion of "they died doing what they love"...I just think that it must have been very lonely in that dark and storm tossed cockpit and I hope that he fought the ***** all the way to the ground.

slipBall
04-20-2006, 05:06 PM
Thunderstorm's extend upward's well over 50 thousand feet, with a few sunny opening's that appear to be safe haven's. They tend to quickly close on you, if you dare to enter them

wayno7777
04-20-2006, 07:24 PM
~S~ and Godspeed, Scott....
http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-04-20-c...bituary_x.htm?csp=27 (http://www.usatoday.com/tech/science/space/2006-04-20-crossfield-obituary_x.htm?csp=27)

Gold_Monkey
04-20-2006, 09:02 PM
S! to a great pilot and member of that fraternity that had the brass balls to fly those experimental aircraft. May you rest in peace.

CdtWeasel
04-20-2006, 09:36 PM
Crossfield was a customer of my company (avionics biz in Manassas). I regret never getting to personally meet him. The 210 he had was a rather old model (struts on the wings) but he kept if filled with good stuff.