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Fish6891
05-26-2005, 09:17 PM
I've decided to give this hobby shot.

Any recommended sites from which I can purchase some nice kits to work on? Any recommended manufacturers for high quality kits? Recommended gear I should have for assembly and doing the paint scheme?

I'm mostly looking into doing 190A&D, and 109G&K, but I think I'll start off with a zero or early spitfire so that if I screw up a little due to lack of experience I won't be messing up my favorite aircraft http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Then I can have a bit more confidence when doing the 190/109 having completed one previously http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Dew-Claw
05-26-2005, 09:31 PM
For German or other Europian theater planes go with Hasegawa
http://www.hasegawa-model.co.jp/e-w/E-index.htm

For American planes or the Yak go woth
Accurate Miniatures

http://www.accurate-miniatures.com/index.shtml

Look at Ebay.
For answers to questions or new technics for builds go to the forums at
Fine Scale Modeler
http://www.finescale.com/

ClnlSandersLite
05-26-2005, 09:46 PM
If you've never done it before, I HIGHLY reccomend that you get some cheap snap togethers and learn the techniques BEFORE you ruin a $200 kit.

Fish6891
05-26-2005, 09:55 PM
^^^I'm not sure how much I can get out of a cheapedy-cheap snap together model...it seems overly simplistic.

I've put several R/C aircraft together so I'm thinking that helps me. Its the painting I'm not so experienced with, but hey, practice makes perfect no? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

I'm not necessarily looking into buying a $200 kit to start with for that reason, but I'm not to interested in getting a cheapy either. I want something nice :]

Jagdgeschwader2
05-26-2005, 10:21 PM
I get my models and supplies from these two.
http://www.greatmodels.com
http://www.squadron.com

I recommend Hasegawa 100% for FW 190-D and 109's in 1/32 scale.
I'm building one at the moment. Be sure to invest in a good airbrush. If you want to build a really top of the line D-9 you can
get extremely high quality resin parts from
http://www.eagleeditions.com. I'm using the corrected radiator cowling,high detail tail wheel assembly and corrected gun cowling. I'm also using their decals for Yellow 15.
Just take your time and go slowly and you
will do just fine. Patience is of the utmost importance in model building. If you want to see some nice models go here: http://www.largescaleplanes.com. I love 1/32 and
larger. I'm not too keen on the smaller scales.

http://home.earthlink.net/~jagdgeschwader26/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderpictures/jagdgeschwader2s.jpg

missiveus
05-26-2005, 10:22 PM
I was into a/c scale modelling for several years, built about fifty kits and still have five or six left (haven't been into it for awhile), I've used this site (http://www.greatmodels.com/) for online purchases. Great selection, reliable vendor.

Manufacturers I recommend: Tamiya kits are high quality, easier to build than Hasagawa kits. Avoid the lower quality kits, at least at first, as they are much more difficult to build. Accurate Miniatures made great, highly detailed kits (especially the Il-2), but they are hard to find since AM went out of business.

If you're serious about modelling, invest in a small compressor and air brush (< $200 for a complete setup). Also use high quality paints, find a line you like and stay with it so you can amass a good color library. Also, use high quality decal sets like AeroMaster to replace the sets included with the kits. Accurate Miniatures is the only mfg. I've used that supplies useable decals.

Once you've built a few kits, the site above sells addon detail sets for specific makes/models/scales: engines/gear/cowlings that offer higher detail than the original model kits.


I stopped making static a/c models because I got into radio controlled flying. That's a whole 'nother world with lots of goodies to spend money on. I still enjoy assembling a/c kits, only now I do more repairs http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/cry.gif.

Good luck. There's great pride and pleasure in a kit well done that is an accurate representation of a piece of history.

http://www.ipmsusa.org/Links/Rpt_SIGS_Aircraft.htm

Friendly_flyer
05-26-2005, 11:28 PM
Originally posted by ClnlSandersLite:
If you've never done it before, I HIGHLY reccomend that you get some cheap snap togethers and learn the techniques BEFORE you ruin a $200 kit.

I can only second this. Most of what's make a kit good is painting and small added details, like filling in gaps and sanding down bad details. Try it out on something cheap and see if you like it. If painting is not your thing, it's better to know it right away than over a very expensive set.

FoolTrottel
05-26-2005, 11:40 PM
Try a Biplane first!
One on the 1/32 scale.
One with wires ... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Hristos
05-27-2005, 01:08 AM
Fish, you are too young to build scale models. That's a hobby for grandaddies http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

The best start would be few cheap models for you to practice with. Or some Allied planes, so it is not a waste if you ruin them http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

Go with 1/48 scale first. Plenty to choose, not too expensive.

Get an airbrush and compressor - Aztek, Iwata or similar. Personally, I prefer enamel paints, but acrylics are easier on the beginner.

With plastic scale models, it is the paintjob which makes most difference. Learn your arirbrush. There are nice online examples and lessons - use them.

After you build first 5-6 models, you can try 1/32. Personally, I like that scale very much. Not so much choice as with 1/48, but Hasegawa made great WW2 models in that scale. All the main fighters are represented.

Before you build any particular model, read the reviews. Ask questions if needed. Go to http://www.hyperscale.com - many tips and useful photos.

For now, stay away from biplanes, complicated paint jobs, wires and rods. A Hellcat, for example, builds into a simple model.

vocatx
05-27-2005, 01:19 AM
I haven't built a scale model in over twenty years, and I don't have any advice that would be helpful. I just wanted to say: please post some pics when you get one done!
Enjoy. It's relaxing, you learn something about the real aircraft each time you build one, and....it'll keep you from blowing my tail out of the sky so often if your busy building!
S! My friend!

IAFS_Painter
05-27-2005, 02:19 AM
Questions you will want to ask yourself:

Which scale - 1/72 gives best range, but there are some beautiful 1/48 and 1/32 scale models out there.
If you are doing just 1 or two models, then maybe you should think big.


Will you use after market stuff - this can jack up the quality of the finished model for little work - but at a cost. A 15 kit can quickly become a 100 (or $100) kit.


Health and safety - especially with after market stuff, check, check, and double check. You may need a resparator (for resin and airbrush) and goggles (for etched metal).
I haven't bothered with goggles - my risk.

ClnlSandersLite
05-27-2005, 03:01 AM
^^^I'm not sure how much I can get out of a cheapedy-cheap snap together model...it seems overly simplistic.

I assure you it's not. There are a few basic important things you can learn by the cheap kits.

1 Painting techniques. VERY necessary. You would not believe just how much room there is to totally trash something in this one alone.

2 Applying decals. There is Quite a bit that can go terribly wrong here. Nothing like spending a month straight (or longer) working on a kit only to **** it up on one of the last steps.

3 Since cheap kits tend to have joints that don't fit together very well, it will give you lots of practice fixing them. If you buy a decent kit, it'll still have a couple of poorly fitting joints. If you don't know how to fix them, you'll ruin the kit.

4 it'll give you some gratification while you build up the necessary tools and learn about your personal preferences as far as equipment goes. you NEED an exacto knife (the kind of old style scalpel that can change blades, sold mostly for hobbiests nowadays as they are considered unsanitary by the medical community), a decent airbrush, matching air compressor. You also need to play with acrillics and enamals and decide which you like where. I prefer acrylics but many prefer enamels. acrillics are easier to work with (especially the metallics), but enamels offer advantages in the areas of weathering and blending. Good brushes are also essential. You can make do with the $5 for 5-10 types, but there is an unbelievable difference between those and the $5-$10 dollars per brush types. You shouldnt start out with the expensives though as you'll just mess them up. A good set of NICE brushes can last an expert a year or more. The same brushes will last a noob a week http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

5 it'll give you some familiarity with how best to assemble these things. From personal experience, the instructions are ALWAYS wrong. At least in regards to the overall method of assembly, as to sub assemblies, they are correct.

6 Give you experience with the glues. I personally reccomend duro "super glue". They make it in both liquid and gel. Liquid is best used in small subasselblies and where there won't be a gap, gel in major assemblies where there is a gap. STAY AWAY from testors model glue (red tube last I knew)



Also, when you get more advanced, you'll occaisonally pick up more/new tools. Like say, your replace your airbrush. When that happens, build a few more cheap kits so you can get used to the tool again.

I cannot stress how important it is that you start cheap. Look for things like testors boxed sets where you get 3 planes for just a few bucks. get kits off of ebay for cheap knowing that they may be missing parts, etc. Basically spend as little money on the kits as possible until you can do the kit justice. Remember, you can't just hit refly in real life. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Also, if you have kids, perhaps give these cheap kits to them when you've finished them. They'll like them, trust me. If not, neighborhood kids will do. You'll be wanting to save your shelf space for the masterpieces http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

Another warning here. If you have kids, KEEP THE MASTER PIECES OUT OF REACH!!!! They are absolutely irresitible to kids. When I was a small boy, my father built a model of the memphis belle (this was well before that movie came out). That man, is better than me, and I'm good. So, the kit was a true masterwork piece of art. Still, art doesn't always survive bombing berlin with a 5 year old in the cockpit http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. Man, I caught a beating for that. Makes me feel all nostalgic. Anyways, You've been warned http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.

ytareh
05-27-2005, 08:09 AM
Hi,I used do quite a bit of plstic modelling as a young teen (even considered it as a career!)and a bit more in early 20s.Id have to throw in an alternative cautious view.It can be quite frustrating when not going 'right'-at least as potentially annoying as general PF/PC maintenance.Of course maybe its only if ya take it too seriously....but reckon if youre like me and many others here you do/will.....! Mind you it does get under your skin!I still have dreams (at least a decade after touching a kit) about visits to super undiscovered model shops.....I even wander through them-in reality!- every now and then.Flight simming and model making have got to be very intercompatible...Im sure Im not alone in having certain 70s Airfix box cover art burnt into my subconscious

x6BL_Brando
05-27-2005, 09:03 AM
He he, I must've assembled all the Airfix combat aircraft from the 1st and 2nd world wars. I gave up eating sweets (candy) and rode everywhere on my bicycle so that I could spend my pocket-money on a 2/- kit. That two shillings btw...or 10 pence in decimal coinage http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif. I had a huge collection by the time I started to get acne and hairy knees - but me and my buddies destroyed the lot of a period of a few weeks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Our favourite sport consisted of inserting a small hook at the point of balance on the top of the fuselage and then letting the models slide down a piece of plastic washing-line tied to my bed and a tree at the end of the garden, while we attempted to knock it out with our .177 air-guns http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Heresy eh? Lol. It got even more destructive when we started filling the fuselages with 'black powder' from penny bangers and attaching a length of Jetex fuse! Watching a Spit or a 109 explode in mid-air was a fine sight to our teenage 'souls' - I guess it was a kind of 'rites of passage' thing.

Whoever had the idea of filling the Lanc with powder and tying the business end of a tuppeny skyrocket under each wing was a genius! It hurtled along the line and exploded with a huge blast that completely severed the washing line and filled the garden with burning polystyrene....it was wild!

Unfortunately, having spent all my pennies on pyrotechnics, I was unable to replace the washing line before the powers-that-be emerged from the clouds! Despite padding my six with several copies of the Beano, I got severely B'n'Z'ed with a carpet slipper! Operations over and the remains of my air force grounded, I turned to the pursuit of young ladies, as is only right & proper.

I sometimes regret my pyromania...but I had my fun, and they were mine to use as I wished. I still have a go now and again...there's a tidy Dr1 by Revell here somewhere...and I have a Russian-made U2VS kit (1/72nd scale) sitting waiting for me to decide which version to assemble. I got it in a closing-down sale for 30pence in 1997. That's the kind of inflation I can deal with! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Jagdtiger
05-27-2005, 12:55 PM
Fish... I really recommend Tamiyas 1/32 Zero (best a/c kit produced according to many) and Hasegawas
new tooled Bf106 G's & K4 and their nice Fw190 A's and D's, builds really nicely and there are many aftermarket suppliers for them too...

HTH and please contact me if you have any more questions...

Kris in Sweden

civildog
05-27-2005, 01:55 PM
1/48 is the best all-around scale right now for a wealth of both kits and add-ons (resin cockpits, photoetch, etc), and it is easier on the eyes than "braille acale" 1/72nd.

I can't recommend the Hasagawa Bf-109 series enough, although the Tamiya E-4/7 is the best of the early types. I have the Hasagawa G-6,14,K-4 and the Tamiy E and they are all perfect jewells right out of the box. The G's benefitted from Aires cockpits and new gunsights but they are all near perfect kits. Overall, Hasagawa outnumbers all others in the vast array of kits I have right now.

The Accurate Miniatures lines are good, but a little limited still. They make a beautiful Yak and the IL2m3 they make is so nice it looks flyable. There are parts in som of their kits (I have 3: SBD-3, IL2m3, Yak-1) that are so small and finely molded that I can't believe they are plastic. Eduard makes an incredibly comprehensive photoetch set for the Il2 that has to be seen to be believed. It has so much in it it doubles the weight of the kit.

Eduard makes the best P-39 line out there..get the P-39Q kit with "Devestating Devil" on the box and it will allow you to make ANY Cobra made unless it had a Hispano cannon. But for that all you'd need is some thin rod. The Eduard kit also comes with masks for the canopy and a nose weight. The doors are hard to close properly but a workaround is to shim them.

Academy also makes some very good kits which are less than any Tamigawa, and while not a shake-the-box-and-a-model-pops-out type of kit (generally) they are a really good value and a good place to start. I recommend in particular the I-16 type 18 (makes the 18 or 24) and La-7 kits (cheaper than Gavia's and almost as good).

Also....a lot of manufacturers buy molds from others so do some research on a kit you want and you can find some good deals. For instance, the Revell ProModeler F-4E (early) Phantom in 1/48 is a repop of the Hasagawa hardwing F-4E. Since the ProModeler version costs half (about 29.00) of any Hasagawa Phantom it's a steal. Same with the Promodeler Me-410 and Academy Stuka. Revell's 1/32 Spitfire I/II is also a Hasagawa repop with a new A wing and is a really nice kit.

I also second all the above advice of airbrushes, paint, etc. I use a Badger 360 airbrush with both acrylics and enamels depending on what I want the paint to do. Future Floorcoat is your friend...it's uses are universal and many, it makes canopies as shiny and clear as glass and is a great medium for gloss to dead matte clearcoats. Mix a drop of black acrylic in it and it's good for oil stains and washes....

Here are some good links, too:

http://www.hyperscale.com/
http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/
http://www.vectorsite.net/indexav.html
http://www.internetmodeler.com/
http://www.missing-lynx.com/
http://www.track-link.net/
http://www.finescale.com/
http://modelingmadness.com/
http://vvs.hobbyvista.com/
http://www.cybermodeler.com/index.shtml
http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/index.html

robban75
05-27-2005, 03:20 PM
Originally posted by Fish6891:
I'm mostly looking into doing 190A&D, and 109G&K.

Without having read all the posts in this thread, I would just like to recommend the 1/32 Hasegawa Fw 190A/D, and BF 109G/K kits. There are no better 1/32 kits out there IMO. The detail is excellent, and they can be out together without too much fuss. The Fw 190D-9 does need some more dihedral though.

I like 1/48 kits as well. The most accurate kits of the FW 190A/D in this scale is the Trimaster/Dragon/ProModeler/Italeri kits. Meaning, that the kits was first issued by Trimaster, then Dragon and so on, but it's the same kit.

The Tamiya Fw 190 kits are much easier to build, but they are not as accurate in the shape as the above mentioned.

Should you want to build a Ta 152H, the Italeri re-boxing of the old(but excellent) Trimaster kit is the only one avaliable in 1/48 scale. It can be a challange to build, but if you're careful it shouldn't be too hard.

If you want to build a Ta 152C, you need the Italeri Ta 152H. The best and only Ta 152C conversion kit can be found here! http://www.dp9.com/fusion/KitPages/4806.htm

http://www.dp9.com/fusion/pics/4806cover.jpg

Good luck and happy building! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

major_setback
05-27-2005, 05:00 PM
The International Plastic Modelers' Society (someone mentioned this already) is the large umbrella organisation for plastic scale modelers. They organize exhibitions, competitions etc. There is a branch of the society in every country, here's the site for USA and UK and a list of other countries sites:

http://www.ipmsusa.org/

http://www.ipms-uk.co.uk/

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-...70-01,GGLC:en&q=IPMS (http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGLC,GGLC:1970-01,GGLC:en&q=IPMS)

Bo_Nidle
05-27-2005, 06:42 PM
I have been making scale models for 30 odd years (Yes! I AM that old!!!).

The quality of kits has never been better. However the price has kept up too unfortunately!

Hasegawa kits are excellent.Tamiya are ,in my opinion better.The Tamiya 1/48th scale P-51,P47 and Spitfire kits are outstanding but they are expensive.

If you are just starting I can recommend the Revell 1/72nd scale kits. I have bought these for my sons to start off on and I am very impressed with the quality and detail you get for very little money.Less than 4 in the UK.

Check out magazines such as Fine Scale Modeller for tips on painting techniques etc.

Once you get going and are used to building,invest in an airbrush such as a Badger 350 to get a really professional finish.

I used to build a lot but then the Pc came along and it died off but it is a really interesting and skillful hobby.Enjoy.

JV44_Wubke
05-27-2005, 06:51 PM
http://www.squadron.com/

Hasagawa, Tamia, trumpeter, Pro Modeler.

Dew-Claw
05-27-2005, 10:53 PM
Accurate Miniatures made great, highly detailed kits (especially the Il-2), but they are hard to find since AM went out of business.


Accurate miniatures is very much alive and kicking.
They have a new warehouse, all thier molds, are producing again(I've bought all mine at the local hobbie shop for under $40) and are almost ready to release the Vindicator.
It'll be a nice adition to the Dauntless, the Avenger and the Yak on ski's I've already done.

Tgd_Voxman
05-28-2005, 08:27 AM
I recommend this place for your airbrush and supplies. When I ordered my Paasche VL, their prices were the best:

Dixie Art (http://www.dixieart.com/)

http://members.cox.net/riknbkr330/109g10.JPG

NIK__14
05-28-2005, 09:28 AM
Nice model...however an LW plane without swastikas is IMHO not a finished model..
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

kotka1965
05-28-2005, 12:04 PM
Here is a good place and many different alternatives.

http://www.plastic-models.com/go/index.html

civildog
05-28-2005, 12:15 PM
I recommend DixieArt as well: the prices are the best AND the shipping is free.

As for good kits for a beginner I would recomend the following as easy to build yet the best detail and most accurate:

TAMIYA: P-51D - get the "Aces of the 8th" edition, it has the markings for "Glamorous Glenn", "Big Beautiful Doll" 2 versions, and "Old Crow"

It has the best wheel wells (Hasagawa's are way too shallow) and a decent cockpit. The fit is perfect. If you want a perfect cockpit for it get the one by True Details - the wooden floor in that has to be seen to be believed.

TAMIYA: P-47 - both the razorback and bubbletops are in this line and are the best out there. The cocpits are so well detailed they look like resin. Kinda pricey, though. The Academy P-47 is a good alternative but the cockpit detail is more sparce and the overall fit not quite as good, but still good.

TRUMPETER: They just came out with a P-40B/C / Tomahawk I/II that is an outstanding kit. The fit is as good as any Tamigawa and the shape is perfect. The only problem is that the cockpit (a common prblem I've found with thier kits) is way too shallow. Cutting Edge (at Meteorprod.com) has a resin cocpit that is a drop-in replacement. Mine fel together in no time and I used Aeromaster's AVG markings for the Hell's Angels group. It also has an access hatch in the fuselage side that's too thick but can be sanded down easliy to a more scale thickness.

TAMIYA: Bf-109E-4/7 - this is the best E kit around. It has parts to make a tropical version of either and has markings for any of the three types. Cockpit detail is adequate and the fit is perfect.


HASAGAWA: Any of this company's line of Fock-Wulfs or 109's are the best on the market. They also make all those planes in 1/32nd. The only real complaint I have about thier planes is that they never have seatbelts. That's an easy fix, but kinda odd considering how good the rest of the kit is.

Hasagawa's G-2 Stuka is outstanding but the flap actuator arms are not very good. Good price and excellent cockpit detail. I cut them off and used the Eduard photoecth kit to rplace them along with all the cocpit and canopy detail that set added. It also provided all the plumbing for the gunpods.

Any of Hasagawa's Japanese planes are museum quality. Best planes in thier stable are the Frank, any Zero, and the Kate. These are all shake-n-bake kits with good detail and markings. Instrument panels can be painted or decals are provided if you want to use them instead of going blind.

Any of the above will give you a good introduction into what models are like today, make it easy to build a beautiful model without frustrating you, and are reasonably priced so if you screw up it won't hurt too bad.

civildog
05-28-2005, 12:34 PM
My type 21 Hasagawa Zero:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v304/civildog/zeroside.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v304/civildog/zeropit.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v304/civildog/zerofrnt.jpg

The antenna wires still need to be replaced after I dropped it, but it's a nice little kit for a beginner.

Tgd_Voxman
05-28-2005, 01:46 PM
Originally posted by NIK__14:
Nice model...however an LW plane without swastikas is IMHO not a finished model..
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
Oh yeah..thanks....

You know, I used to think that way at first. I realized that I would eventually display these around the house, and I just felt I had to respect my Jewish friends' dead relatives by not having the Hakenkreutz on 'em.
And it really doesn't make a difference, its still a fantastic looking airplane.

Platypus_1.JaVA
05-28-2005, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by Dew-Claw:
Accurate miniatures is very much alive and kicking.
They have a new warehouse, all thier molds, are producing again(I've bought all mine at the local hobbie shop for under $40) and are almost ready to release the Vindicator.
It'll be a nice adition to the Dauntless, the Avenger and the Yak on ski's I've already done.

All to True but, I wouldn't recommend the B-25 series of kits. They are quite expensive here in Europe and I felt that AM wasoverstretching their abilities a bit. I've found some minor in-accuracies (most namely, the ring where the upper turret should rest on) and some fitting problems that should've been easy to overcome if they designed the parts diffrently. Especially true in the nose area. Altough the kit comes with an extensive construction manual with lots of good info, I left-out some minor internal parts because I couldn't figure out how to fit them. And the result isn't seen anyways.

WarWolfe_1
05-28-2005, 07:53 PM
www.greatmodels.com (http://www.greatmodels.com)

TX-EcoDragon
05-28-2005, 11:12 PM
And if you want some that fly, take a look here: http://www.hobby-lobby.com/warbirds.htm

Phas3e
05-29-2005, 01:13 AM
Just a question about that 109,
what profile did you use for it?
this 109 puzzles me as i have seen it in several different ways as "white 44" of Jg7
and also more often in Jg 301 markings,
I have also seen one almost exactly the same from Jg7 as "yellow 44" It can also be assumed that such a high number could mean it was from a training unit,
and your model is the first time ive seen it with a yellow under nose.

Can anyone shed some light on this for me http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Platypus_1.JaVA
05-29-2005, 05:11 AM
Now we are talking model aircaft here, I've bought the Revell B-25 1:48 and I wanted to make the 8 gun-nose variant but, I can't seem to find any after-market set with the 8 gun nose. Does anyone know how to obtain an 1:48 B-25 (not b-26) 8 gun nose?

Thx in advance.

Tgd_Voxman
05-29-2005, 07:58 AM
Originally posted by Phas3e:
Just a question about that 109,
what profile did you use for it?
this 109 puzzles me as i have seen it in several different ways as "white 44" of Jg7
and also more often in Jg 301 markings,
I have also seen one almost exactly the same from Jg7 as "yellow 44" It can also be assumed that such a high number could mean it was from a training unit,
and your model is the first time ive seen it with a yellow under nose.

Can anyone shed some light on this for me http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

I built that about 5 years ago so I don't remember my source. I probably took artistic license. But I do remember that those were the decals included in the box, no aftermarket.

civildog
05-29-2005, 12:10 PM
Revell Germany makes a B-25J with the painted over 8-gun nose.

http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=RG4360

FoolTrottel
05-29-2005, 01:59 PM
Originally posted by CivilDog:
Revell Germany makes a B-25J with the painted over 8-gun nose.

http://www.squadron.com/ItemDetails.asp?item=RG4360

Hey CivilDog, yer giving Platypus a true modeling challenge here ....
the Revell model you are referring to is at 1/72nd scale, he's building a 1/48th scale http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

civildog
05-29-2005, 06:05 PM
Then he'll have to rely on good ol' fashioned modeling skills to rebuild the nose.

Trigger_88
05-29-2005, 08:48 PM
I would get a revell tamiya or hasaegawa model. I like revell cuase there cheap easy to replace parts: dont have to order them from China or Japan + there made in USA http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Yoxford_Boy
05-29-2005, 10:30 PM
First off I'm happy to see that there are still a lot of people who share the same hobby, of building scale models, as I do. I find that it is a very relaxing as well as educational hobby. All of the above information is great, here are a few more helpful hints that I have learned.

1. Find a quite spot to build, with little distractions (all it takes is one little screw up on three different layers of paint to ruin your day). Although I tend to watch the history channel while I work.

2. Don't be discouraged when you mess up. All new modellers have screwed up a model or two. I can look back and name at least three or four that I wish I could redo. Just don't rush things and be patient and you'll have better results.

3. Do research and read articles about model building. Fine Scale Modeller magazine is a great and easy to find source. Support your local hobby store and check out there research material, the majority of hobby stores have a good supply of research material (Squadron/Osprey etc). Plus check out http://www.modelingmadness.com they have reviews of a lot of great kits as well as helpfull hints.

Finally don't get to caught up in historical accuracy (least not yet). While it can add a new level of detail, It may also suck the imagination and fun out of it. Good luck

Platypus_1.JaVA
05-30-2005, 08:42 AM
Originally posted by CivilDog:
Then he'll have to rely on good ol' fashioned modeling skills to rebuild the nose.

Yup, however, I want to build at least three other Mitchells too so, I won't bother with it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I plan to have at least 4 or 5 Mitchells, all in Dutch markings. but, that will take several years. I've done one now and I've carefully started the second.

FoolTrottel
05-30-2005, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by Platypus_1.JaVA:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by CivilDog:
Then he'll have to rely on good ol' fashioned modeling skills to rebuild the nose.

Yup, however, I want to build at least three other Mitchells too so, I won't bother with it http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif I plan to have at least 4 or 5 Mitchells, all in Dutch markings. but, that will take several years. I've done one now and I've carefully started the second. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Is this one of 'm? http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v668/fooltrottel/Startklaar.jpg

Dew-Claw
05-30-2005, 07:48 PM
Originally posted by Hristos:
Fish, you are too young to build scale models. That's a hobby for grandaddies http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif.




LOL Boy is that correct
the cost can quickly get out of hand.
I've got a couple grand invested and I got most of my kits for free.
The rest is tools,equipment and supplies.

Of course , some of those tools cross over...
Disk sander for custom bases doubles for household repairs, ect...at least thats how I justified the purchase. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Tanabi_
05-30-2005, 10:43 PM
Fish if you really looking for a 190 I recommend you try the Trumpepter 1/24 scale Focke wulf 190D9 . It not really a starter kit since there is some advance modeling stuff to it but does have very detail features and it big.

Also the Company Airfix also has a 1/24 190A/F kit this one is not really detail but it comes with a complete and fully detailed BMW radial engine and accessory section. The kit allows you to choose from A5 , A6 or the F2 series 190. It not as detail as teh trumpeter kit but it alright.

Now if you looking into 109 and want something big and is a big fan of the let say the G2 then trumpeter also got a 1:24 scale 109 G2 kit. Like the D9 it really up there in turn of skill need to built it but it very nice when compelete

If you looking for starting kits dealing with 190 and 109 try the Tamiya kits as they are easier to assmebly for starters. Good luck on choosing you kits

Platypus_1.JaVA
05-31-2005, 09:07 AM
Originally posted by FoolTrottel:


Is this one of 'm? http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v668/fooltrottel/Startklaar.jpg

This is not the particular aircraft I had in mind but, I allready have something similar in the works. The one I finished can be viewed here on our forum:
http://www.1java.nl/showthread.php?t=3614&page=2&pp=15
Approx on one third of the page. It is a B-25C N5-128 of the 18th (NEI) squadron. I allready have excellent transfers for a normal bomber version of the B-25J so, I'll just use that one for my next model. I'll have a silver nose and engine nacelles but, the rest will be standard US Olive Drab and Grey. Very similar to the skin I did. You can view (and download!) the skin on http://www.skinnersheaven.com Look for skins by 1.JaVA_Platypus. It is called: " B-25J M-451 post war "

http://www.skinnersheaven.com/images/skins/preview/22.jpg

Fish6891
05-31-2005, 09:06 PM
Thanks for all the tips and links err'body, appreciate it! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif