PDA

View Full Version : Alienware being bought by Dell



Tribunus
03-24-2006, 08:14 AM
I've read that Dell is buying Alienware.
What is the consensus of opinion on Alienware computers for FB/AEP/PF or other demanding games?

I took a quick look at some of the Alienware rigs, and saw that they only offered DVD Read Write with no option for a Read Only.
Has anyone with an Alienware computer ever had any problems because of this?

lbhskier37
03-24-2006, 09:13 AM
I've read good reviews of them. Hopefully Dell doesn't mess with a good thing because XPS systems are horrible gaming boxes unless you do a complete reformat and install just necessary software. My only problem with Alienware though is their god-aweful ugly cases, they should get it that not every gamer wants a huge gawdy case that would look at home at a Star Trek convention.

AVG_WarHawk
03-24-2006, 11:46 AM
Originally posted by lbhskier37:
I've read good reviews of them. Hopefully Dell doesn't mess with a good thing because XPS systems are horrible gaming boxes unless you do a complete reformat and install just necessary software. My only problem with Alienware though is their god-aweful ugly cases, they should get it that not every gamer wants a huge gawdy case that would look at home at a Star Trek convention.

My thoughts exactly!

knightflyte
03-24-2006, 11:57 AM
Dude!

You're gettin' and Alienware!

dglasal
03-24-2006, 04:09 PM
With the recent announcement from Dell that they will not use AMD processors in their computers, this may be their way of getting their company into the AMD market. This will allow them to focus one part of their brand name on business and another to focus on gamers. This can be good as I found Alienware rather expensive for what they offered, though they seem to be very good systems. Will Dell truly have a gaming system that will compete with other companies?

james_ander
03-24-2006, 06:27 PM
I am soooo glad I roll my own now.

jarink
03-24-2006, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by james_ander:
I am soooo glad I roll my own now.

Ditto.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

LEXX_Luthor
03-25-2006, 12:07 AM
Some ideas about this here, from an AlienWare competitor, scroll down a day or two

~> http://voodoopc.blogspot.com/

Bearcat99
03-25-2006, 12:25 AM
Originally posted by jarink:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by james_ander:
I am soooo glad I roll my own now.

Ditto.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE> http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

mortoma
03-25-2006, 07:28 PM
Well, there goes the neighborhood!!! I'm sure Dell
will ship Alienwares with all the preloaded "bloatware" typical of a their existing machines.
The PCs will come with so much stuff runing in the background you'll have to go to extremes to get them up to good gaming peformance. They may also go to more proprietary hardware which makes upgrades difficult if not impossible. I too am glad I build my own systems now. I have considered Alienware in the past but I'll continue building my own PCs for sure now.

woofiedog
03-26-2006, 01:27 AM
Quote... Tribunus... I took a quick look at some of the Alienware rigs, and saw that they only offered DVD Read Write with no option for a Read Only.
Has anyone with an Alienware computer ever had any problems because of this?

None.

The case is a bit Ugly... but it's Very Fuctional. There is or was at the time I purchased mine for the option of the more common case from Alieware.

VMF-214_HaVoK
03-26-2006, 11:51 AM
If you are not building your own PCs by now then you either got a lot of money to waste or you just enjoy supporting billion dollar companies.

ytareh
03-26-2006, 02:45 PM
Well I even begrudge the ATi CCCs share of RAM and the bare minimum needed to run Creative sound cards right.Hate to think what these Dell machines are like.Couldnt believe the amount of crud on the wife's Sony Vaio.

WWSensei
03-27-2006, 07:37 AM
Have 2 machines I built myself and my main gaming machine is a Dell 8250. While it did come with a some extra stuff I didn't want it was also easy to uninstall those. I uninstalled Office Works and replaced it with Office 2003, kept the AV and DVD playing software. If you speak with them on the phone they are often willing to just not install the stuff at all beyond XP with SP2.

The machines I built myself require fiddling. I'm always having to tweak something or other, but they run well enough and power wise on par with the Dell. In fact, if I upgrade my son's CPU his machine will be faster than mine. But, I'm tired of fiddling with it when something doesn't work right or some new game doesn't like the vid card and sound card combo etc.

No particular hardware fanboi either. The home builts are AMD machines with nVidia cards and the Dell a P4 with an ATI X800.

The difference in cost was only a couple of hundred dollars difference in the end....the biggest difference is I've never really had to fool with the Dell. When I did have an issue with the mobo there was a tech at my house the next day who installed a new mobo in 20 minutes. I didn't even have to hold a screwdriver.

I like NOT having to deal with PITA factors in a PC. Maybe, when I was younger and had the time, but as I've gotten older I simply want things to run WITHOUT my having to fiddle with them constantly. Kind of like a car....when I was 16 I thought it was fun to take apart a carbeurator and re-wire the sound system in a car. Today, that's just work with little redeeming fun factor involved. I'd rather drive the car than work on it.

While a few years ago I think the price differences were greater between pre-built and home-built systems I don't believe they are that much different today.

lbhskier37
03-27-2006, 11:10 AM
Originally posted by WWSensei:


While a few years ago I think the price differences were greater between pre-built and home-built systems I don't believe they are that much different today.

The difference is still quite big if you are looking at gaming machines. I was pricing out a gaming box with some of the big guys and I came to around $3000 for the setup that I wanted, including monitor keyboard/mouse, and speakers. I priced the identical system on Newegg and came to just under $2000. If it were only a few hundred I would go with a prebuilt to save the time and hassle of putting it together, but $1000 is a good chunk of coin. And I am sure the Dell gaming boxes are fine when you uninstall all the junk, but to me the point of getting a prebuilt machine is to be able to use it right from the box and not have to **** around uninstalling and configuring. If anyone out there is considering an XPS gaming system I would suggest you check out www.hardopc.com (http://www.hardopc.com) and look at their review of their "XPS experience", not something I would pay $1000 price premium for.

On another note, Dells basic systems are fine. If you have someone who just wants to surf the web and check their email you can't beat Dell on price by building it yourself. It's when you want a bit more than basic that they get ya.

x6BL_Brando
03-27-2006, 02:53 PM
I just built a rig. A8N-E, 3500+ Venice, 2 Gb Mushkin Black, a Raptor, a Caviar, a top-end PSU, an x1800xt, water-cooling, anti-surge UPS, 19" ViewSonic, Audigy Platinum, speakers, a couple of optical drives, even a copy of XP, and a good tower case. It was built specifically for FB and film & music-editing, plus general browsing, e-mailing and so on. Assembly took twelve hours, installations & config took about ten, including loading FB(m) to 4.04...and it was running sweetly after a week when the client picked it up. I did the build for free 'cos the guy's an old mate and used to do a wicked job tuning my motorbike before he moved to Spain, hence the water-cooling.

Anyway, he wanted a budget job - so no Crossfire or 64x2 etc - and I think that just over 1600 was a great price for all the hardware listed above. All the parts as new are solid fine and the build was not at all complex. Barring component failure I don't see why it would fall over any time in the next few years. I ought to say that he would have done it himself but had a website to service and various contacts to meet.

Just to piss everybody off http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif I'll add that I only have one arm (and no prosthetic)and the build time is slow for that reason. I think it also shows that the business is not at all hard to do if a one-armed geezer can undertake it!

Price that spec with Alienware - and ask yourself if Dell are going to lower that price without cutting corners somewhere. Self-build is still the most economical & sensible way of building a gaming rig unless you have money to burn.

B.

-HH-Quazi
03-27-2006, 05:22 PM
I own a Dell 4550 that I upgraded as far as the mobo would allow to play this sim on long before I built my own. I have to say it is running right along and I have had 0 problems with it. Plus, it turned out to be a decent gaming rig.

Then I built this rig. Yea, it is a lot better rig to game on. The only gripe I have with the Dell is it is proprietary. No overclocking. No tweaking. Wysiwyg. With my home built rig, plenty of things to tweak for better performance. As far as having to fiddle with my home built deal, yea, there has been some of that. But it doesn't bother me too much.

A Dell is good for what its' intended purposes are, nothing more, nothing less. I've had the Dell since 2002 and have had 0 issues with it. A very smooth running rig.

Blottogg
03-28-2006, 07:51 AM
I've never owned a Dell, but have had an Alienware in the past. The only gripe I had was the case, which is basically a perfectly good Antec dipped in plastic cladding that makes it hard to move or open. At the time their prices were only a couple of hundred more than a roll-your-own, though that may have changed.

What I've read about the deal is that for the time being Dell will continue to run Alienware as an independent division. Since Dell doesn't seem inclined to offer AMD processors for the forseeable future, this is a way to offer those to the public. Though Alienware is primarily a boutique game machine builder, they also build business servers and workstations. And they're not a billion dollar company. IIRC their gross last year was something like $172 million.

Aside from the usual PR fluff about savings from larger volume, synergistic product lines etc., it will be interesting to see how they'll handle this long term. Alienware prices might go down a bit, but they were already buying high end components in fairly large volumes, and limited supply of these top-end pieces will dictate the prices regardless of how many get ordered. Maybe Dell can convince them to offer more practical cases, at least. Alienware may also get access to the quad-SLI hardware for the uber-machines. Not something I'm contemplating, unless I feel the need for a space heater in the basement.

Sensei, with talk like that, you're never going to own a classic British roadster. I'm in total agreement though. Some folks love tweaking their computers (or their cars) ad infinitum, but I'm not one of those. I went a middle route on my latest machine, buying the components, but having the guys at TigerDirect put it together (they've got a retail store here.) Troubleshooting my previous homebrew rig was driving me to drink (or would have, if I drank.) If I have a problem now, I just drop it off and tell them "it's a boat anchor, fix it." And they do, not me. By the same philosophy, I drive a Miata now, instead of my old MGB. Both decisions are doing good things for my blood pressure.

WWSensei
03-28-2006, 08:04 AM
Originally posted by Blottogg:

Sensei, with talk like that, you're never going to own a classic British roadster.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It's my 4 year endeavor in re-building a 1970 original Austin Mini that has made me reach the conclusion. ;-) I just dropped a brand spanking new 1250 engine in (upgraded from the original 850) only to find the muffler interferes with the new axle boots. I figure it needs about $1500 more work to be running or about 10 weekends of my time. The $1500 is really looking cheap because I am sick of this thing being in garage when it should be out on the road.

My other cars are a 1994 Toyota Corrolla with 225,000 miles on it and a 1995 Acura Integra sitting around 130,000 miles. They just run with the odd dollop of oil and some gas. Just like I like them.