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XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 07:21 PM
a friend of mine passed me a cd called "original pirate material" by "the streets". Apart for the rough cockney accent there's another thing that impressed me: the word "geezer", repeated for...uhm...let me see...the whole album? Since i'm not british and dont know much about slang (that eventually changes every 5 mins, like here in italy), can somebody give me a definition of "geezer"? thanks in advance lads

SJ


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XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 07:21 PM
a friend of mine passed me a cd called "original pirate material" by "the streets". Apart for the rough cockney accent there's another thing that impressed me: the word "geezer", repeated for...uhm...let me see...the whole album? Since i'm not british and dont know much about slang (that eventually changes every 5 mins, like here in italy), can somebody give me a definition of "geezer"? thanks in advance lads

SJ


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Visita il portale italiano di IL-2 Sturmovik!!!

XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 07:27 PM
That's a drum n Bass/ breakbeat album isn't? Cool as I recall- but I don't remember the "geezer" references...

In Canada (at least where I live) a geezer is just an old person- but then I have no idea what Phat means, or why "bad" really means good, or why some people want to put caps in other peoples asses.... maybe I'm not the best reference to field this question lol /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif [EDIT: yup, this last bit has been confirmed]



Message Edited on 07/17/0307:16PM by Cold_Gambler

XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 07:40 PM
OK! A Geezer is a Bloke or a Man, a Guy. Maybe a bit of a general term but, not really a derogatory term. e.g "Diamond Geezer"= great Bloke!
SM

XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 08:01 PM
Geezer originally seems to be London slang for an ordinary man, but is increasingly used to mean someone who is a bit streetwise or a wheeler dealer.

Regards,

RocketDog.

XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 09:28 PM
lol thanks guys, now i go back to the cd /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif
I kinda thought it had this meaning, just wanted to be sure! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

SJ

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XyZspineZyX
07-17-2003, 09:51 PM
The Cassel 'Dictionary of Slang' by Jonathon Green wonders if it may have come from the Basque 'giza', a man, and been picked up by Wellington's troops during the Penninsular War (1808-14).

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In the struggle for labour resources the (German) air ministry was at a considerable disadvantage politically, since labour recruitment and allocation was controlled by agencies directly linked to the army, and unsympathetic to Luftwaffe demands. During 1942 the number of workers allocated rose hardly at all despite the large numbers drafted in from Europe. Over the whole period the army continued to recruit skilled workers even in the protected factories. In all the aircraft factories an average of between 45 and 50 per cent of the workforce was composed of foreign labour by the end of the war.

Professor Richard Overy, The Air War 1939-45

XyZspineZyX
07-18-2003, 01:46 AM
Mr_Nakajima wrote:
- The Cassel 'Dictionary of Slang' by Jonathon Green
- wonders if it may have come from the Basque 'giza',
- a man, and been picked up by Wellington's troops
- during the Penninsular War (1808-14).
-

eheheheheheh!!!
more than what I expected! Thanks for the research!

SJ

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