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oscar0072004
11-09-2004, 11:27 AM
oscar0072004: after we order a crash dive and put all the available crew in the forward compartment . will it then be possible to submerge a few seconds faster
DevTeam: No, the crash dive will work faster from the mechanics. You will not need to move crew around the boat for that.

well i can live with that . but why did they do this? why did they do this in das boot?

oscar0072004
11-09-2004, 11:27 AM
oscar0072004: after we order a crash dive and put all the available crew in the forward compartment . will it then be possible to submerge a few seconds faster
DevTeam: No, the crash dive will work faster from the mechanics. You will not need to move crew around the boat for that.

well i can live with that . but why did they do this? why did they do this in das boot?

bertgang
11-09-2004, 11:39 AM
People in forward compartment adds no more than two tons that side; you can't have the whole crew there.

I believe that the difference in diving speed is really short.

SailorSteve
11-10-2004, 01:33 PM
Agree with Bertgang. People do not weigh that much. Also, I know that U.S. subs were equipped with special "trim" and "bouyancy" tanks that allowed for the fast transfer of tons of water from one end of the boat to the other, specifically to aid with quick diving/surfacing; I would assume U-boats had the same technology.

radsov
11-10-2004, 01:38 PM
I think that the larger boats did, i.e. the type IXC/40 etc. but I think the smaller ones i.e. classic type VII didn't. But I may be wrong if anyone knows better.

Pr0metheus 1962
11-10-2004, 03:16 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by oscar0072004:
but why did they do this? why did they do this in das boot? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

It's possible that a U-Boat commander would do this just to get the men moving to break up the tendency to panic. Firstly, it caters to the instinctual 'fight or flight' response. Secondly, it gets the crewmembers (at least those who have no specific job to do) together, which would tend to make each crewmember both feel safer and which would stifle any crewmember's panic response (you don't want to panic in front of your mates). Finally, it would add a slight extra weight to the front of the boat. This extra weight is negligible, but when you add in the psychological aspects, this latter reason is a convenient tool to keep the crewmembers busy and less frightened than they might otherwise be.

U-Boat commanders were masters of psychological warfare, so I wouldn't be at all surprised if they used a little psychology to make their crew more relaxed in the most difficult circumstances. Erich Topp admits as much in his interview on www.uboat.net: (http://www.uboat.net:) Topp Interview (video file) (http://www.uboat.net/men/interviews/topp3.ram)