PDA

View Full Version : BF109..why so rare?



Fighterduck
01-12-2008, 07:29 AM
Ok..the thing is...i never saw a real 109 fliyng during an arishow..im waiting for this ^^

But my thought was: well, during ww2 33.000 bf109 were build. On the other hand 15,875 p51 were build and 20,351 Spitfire for England. So the double of p51 number of the german fighter were build but only few can fly..compared to the 160 p51 that can still fly. The same thought can be made for the Fw 190.

So why this plane is so rare? its only for the fact that it has a lesser long post-war life? ...

Loco-S
01-12-2008, 07:37 AM
all the planes turned out to have a serious case of bulldozer infestation after the war, chances are that if you live in Europe, you may have used a kitchen utensil that was a 109 part at some time.

Deedsundone
01-12-2008, 07:45 AM
Who wants a looser plane when you can have a winner one... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

"The Finnish Air Force did not retire their Bf 109Gs until March 1954"
Dind´t know that.

How about Avia S-99 and Avia S-199 or Hispano Aviacion Ha 1112.
Am I the only one who thinks the Avia-199 looks kinda good? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Ratsack
01-12-2008, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by Loco-S:
all the planes turned out to have a serious case of bulldozer infestation after the war, chances are that if you live in Europe, you may have used a kitchen utensil that was a 109 part at some time.

Yep. I've got an old 'bread dish' from the immediate post war period. Nice aluminium.

Actually, jokes aside, these alloy pots and pans were a real boon in 1945-6, because the metals shortages meant that cooking pots couldn't be easily replaced in occupied Europe. The tinkers kept on repairing the old ones: a clay ring around the hole, pour in the molten metal, clean up. Good until the next hole...

The aircraft grade alloy cooking sets churned out after the war replaced the cooking utensils in many European kitchens.

Ratsack

Kurfurst__
01-12-2008, 08:10 AM
At the war`s end captured planes, except those which were of new technology and worth to be investigated, were just piled up and destroyed. Same thing happened to even brand new Allied bombers, they were scrapped just as they came out of the factory (quite literally). They were no longer needed. One of the reasons I guess there are so many Mustangs still around is that the P-51 remained in service, fought in Korea too, and afterwards, many that remained were conserved and later brought by private individuals for bargain prices.

Also in battered Europe, 1945, the population was rather more busy trying to get food supplies, clothes and coal for the winter rather than flying aircraft.

Fighterduck
01-12-2008, 08:12 AM
Avia-199

uhm...yes you must be the only one ^^



so wait..the reason because there are no more 109 is a history of kitchen utensil?
that means that England and USA had no problem with fork and kinfe production?ah well maeby germany had problems with limited materials as during the war they utilised pretty all what the had....but is this the reply?

sure..food was more important that keeping aircrafts....but how Kurfurst said, the 51 had a much longer post war life..so i think that the two things goes in the same direction. I mean, germany needed resources so planes metal was needed. On the other hand if the 109 had a more long post war operational life i think there would be more 109 around today.....maeby

Kurfurst__
01-12-2008, 09:18 AM
There are quite a few Bf 109s around, a lot more in fact than most of us (including me) would realize. Another factor you have to consider is the political attitude towards WW2 in post-war Germany... there is/was almost split personality attitude towards this, and the Bf 109 was considered for a long time a too iconic memento of this past. In short, restoring a Bf 109 - or any other plane - that could be seen, even if with a lot of imaginative power as a glorification of the Nazi era did not really belong to the world of 'politically correct'..

VW-IceFire
01-12-2008, 09:18 AM
Originally posted by Fighterduck:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Avia-199

uhm...yes you must be the only one ^^



so wait..the reason because there are no more 109 is a history of kitchen utensil?
that means that England and USA had no problem with fork and kinfe production?ah well maeby germany had problems with limited materials as during the war they utilised pretty all what the had....but is this the reply?

sure..food was more important that keeping aircrafts....but how Kurfurst said, the 51 had a much longer post war life..so i think that the two things goes in the same direction. I mean, germany needed resources so planes metal was needed. On the other hand if the 109 had a more long post war operational life i think there would be more 109 around today.....maeby </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
The point is that pretty much all World War II planes were simply plowed into the ground, broken down for scrap metal, and hauled off. Not that many original WWII aircraft survive...period. Be they 109s or Thunderbolts or P-38s or Mitchells. Most of the surviving examples were "lucky" enough to be sold off at the end of the war to other nations and then bough back by private interest when their service life was over. The Lancaster (that still flies) at Canadian Warplane Heritage was used for a number of post war roles including search and rescue if I remember correctly. The Mustang was the only fighter in the USAAF inventory that made it through to the Korean War. Thunderbolts were kept in National Guard units for a couple of years and the P-38 all but disappeared. Mustangs were also popular on air racing circuits so thats why many of them survive today - also worth noting that many of the flying examples (of any plane) are not really warbirds and they only have a few parts that are from original aircraft.

There ARE 109s that still exist. Most of them are in museums and there is one in Niagara Falls Canada that is an original Bf109E-4 complete with DB601 engine that still flies.

SeaFireLIV
01-12-2008, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by Fighterduck:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Avia-199

uhm...yes you must be the only one ^^



so wait..the reason because there are no more 109 is a history of kitchen utensil?
that means that England and USA had no problem with fork and kinfe production?ah well maeby germany had problems with limited materials as during the war they utilised pretty all what the had....but is this the reply?

sure..food was more important that keeping aircrafts....but how Kurfurst said, the 51 had a much longer post war life..so i think that the two things goes in the same direction. I mean, germany needed resources so planes metal was needed. On the other hand if the 109 had a more long post war operational life i think there would be more 109 around today.....maeby </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

IMHO you`re not putting yourself into the mindset of the time.

The 109 was an enemy aircraft that represented fascism, nazism. It also represented a long and terrible war in which millions died, more civilians than military. No one, especially the defeated germans, wanted to be associated with or reminded of WWII any more. the 109 as well as many other Reich weapons were unwanted except by foreignnations to study and the odd interested party. the rest were happily scrapped and left to rot.

You cannot compare allied planes such as P51s in the same mold, as they were associated with victory and the `feel good ` facter. Even then a lot of allied planes were scrapped, but nothing like the scrapping of Axis planes. Also, after the war, it was the US and russians doing the military stuff for Germany, no need for 109s. The only 109 planes being used were in Spain and ironically, some in Israel.

Today, in 2008, aloof from the horror of world war where nearly everyone lost someone, it`s easy to say `why?` In 1945, it was all too obvious why.

Kurfurst__
01-12-2008, 09:31 AM
This site makes an excellent job listing the existing 109s... there are a lot more of them I have imagined originally, but not keeping such a high profile.

http://www.preservedaxisaircraft.com/Luftwaffe/messerschmitt/messerschmitt.htm

A 109K that also survived is currently under restoration from what I`ve heard.

Fighterduck
01-12-2008, 09:31 AM
uhm..yes there are more 109 left than what we think..but only really few can fly...personally o know only black 6 and 2 ..but blakc 6 is now in a raf museum because of a crash and no one know if he will fly again.
I found many bf109 wrecks around but only one or two are in restauration. Well maeby it more easy to buy a complete 51 than but tons of money for a 109 restauration. But from my point of view, it would be great to see more of those planes around..51, 47, spitifres are great thats for sure..always a pleasure to see them fly...but, well, they are always the same...and away from political or ideological thought i think 109 and 190 are some great planes. Sure, for someone it could "hurt" to see them flying around, but as a pice of history i hope to see them fly somewhere around in the future.


edit: i saw only now Kurfurst post: nice! some interresting projects here..hope to see them in the future.

JZG_Thiem
01-12-2008, 09:53 AM
Regarding flyable 109s i know of at least 4.
Messerschmitt Stiftung has 2. One being a G6, one G10. Plus the (now) restored "Red 7" of MAC, which resembles a G4. Messerschmitt air company (http://www.me-air-company.de/)
Yet they are all Hispano conversions. The only real wartime 109 is (afaik) the one (static) in the UK (duxford?).

There is one more recently restored 109E in canada.

Fighterduck
01-12-2008, 09:58 AM
Originally posted by JZG_Thiem:
The only real wartime 109 is (afaik) the one (static) in the UK (duxford?).



thats the black 6 that crashed

Outlaw---
01-12-2008, 10:03 AM
IIRC both Corsairs and Bearcats saw limited service in Korea, although I think the Bearcats were only used by the French.

The Navy used Corsairs fairly heavily and I believe the first black Navy pilot was killed when he was forced down (engine problems) in the snowy highlands. He survived the crash but was injured pretty badly and trapped in the aircraft. His wingman ditched nearby and along with the rescue chopper crew that finally arrived tried to free him but failed. The pilot lost consciousness and they left as darkness and sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub-sub zero temperatures, were setting in. Both aircraft and the body were napalmed the next morning.

I seem to remember that many Corsairs were used exclusively as ground attack and were fitted with a derated R-2800 without the superchargers since they never went above 200 feet. I think these versions of the Corsairs were given an "A" designation but I can't remember the context.

There were also some radar equipped night fighter Corsairs that may have had the standard Double Wasp.

--Outlaw.

Kurfurst__
01-12-2008, 10:17 AM
Originally posted by JZG_Thiem:
Yet they are all Hispano conversions. The only real wartime 109 is (afaik) the one (static) in the UK (duxford?).

Kinda never understood that Buchon/Hispano thing, it`s always like if these were not 109s, but some sort of cheapo China copies or what, even the restored planes that have been re-engined with a DB engine. But, AFAIK, all of the Hispano-109s originate to German built Bf 109G-2 airframes, which the Germans exported to Spain during the war, but without engine. So the Spanish took these 109G aiframes and fitted whatever engine (a domestic Hispano-Suiza or a Merlin 45 series) was available.
So, I am puzzled why these restored 'Buchon conversions' are not real 109s... sure they were not serving with a 'genuine' Luftwaffe unit during the war, but 109Gs the same nonetheless.

JZG_Thiem
01-12-2008, 10:47 AM
i never said that they are *cheapo China copies*, neither did i mention that they are *no real 109s*. I just said they are *no wartime 109s*, being german built 109s equipped with DB engines and used by the Luftwaffe. Of course the DB engines are pretty genuine, since i have not heared that anyone was rebuilding complete engines after 1945.

I have seen all three german 109s on flying display as well as at the flightline. Of course they look exactly like any other 109, with the difference that they dont fit to any specific model exactly. They are a kind of mix of different features of different models. Most proll only a real expert would figure that, so *no big deal*. From what i have heared, several of those changes are due to maintenance and safety reasons, since they are rare and very expensive *toys*.

I have a classic car and i am well aware of the original/not original discussions, trust me.

fordfan25
01-12-2008, 11:00 AM
the resone u dont see many 109s is because of the p51s http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 11:02 AM
Originally posted by fordfan25:
the resone u dont see many 109s is because of the p51s http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Beat me to it!

DxyFlyr
01-12-2008, 12:02 PM
Originally posted by fordfan25:
the resone u dont see many 109s is because of the p51s http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Ha, I was gonna say the 50 cal.

Didn't the Isreali Air Force fly 109's for a time?

ElAurens
01-12-2008, 12:15 PM
The IAF flew Czech built Avia 199s, which were basically 109G6s with Jumo bomber engines.

The IAF pilots said those aircraft tried to kill them every time they flew them.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/97/Avia-S199-hatzerim-3.jpg/800px-Avia-S199-hatzerim-3.jpg
Preserved Avia 199 at the IAF Museum.

Plelv44_Mangrov
01-12-2008, 12:16 PM
1947: Almost all Finnish Blenheims, Dorniers and Junkers were scraped because of the Paris Peace Treatie.

1953: The last Junkers and Dorniers were scraped.

1964: The last Curtiss H-75s, Fiat G.50s and some Bf-109s were scraped.

Von_Rat
01-12-2008, 12:37 PM
werent p51s in service with some south american airforces well into the seventies?

Ugly_Kid
01-12-2008, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by JZG_Thiem:
i never said that they are *cheapo China copies*, neither did i mention that they are *no real 109s*. I just said they are *no wartime 109s*, being german built 109s equipped with DB engines and used by the Luftwaffe. Of course the DB engines are pretty genuine, since i have not heared that anyone was rebuilding complete engines after 1945.

In fact they did - Volvo in Sweden, for instance licensed DB 605, nevertheless quite a perfect DB 605, although not a genuinely assembled by forced labour



I have seen all three german 109s on flying display as well as at the flightline. Of course they look exactly like any other 109, with the difference that they dont fit to any specific model exactly. They are a kind of mix of different features of different models. Most proll only a real expert would figure that, so *no big deal*.

In fact, FMBB from Mtt Stiftung, for example, is pretty much rebuild true to G-6 standard, with couple of exceptions which mainly affect the safety. For example, the prop is made of wood, because a) it was impossible to find a genuine Gustav VDM metal prop that was in usable state for flying b) wooden prop is cheaper than a bent DB 605 crankshaft. Additionally there's additional cooler integrated into the cowlings, since they want to operate the plane a bit longer than the original was ever visioned and they have had already quite a few engine stoppages.

Furthermore I don't get your comment about only genuine German wartime built 109s located in UK - static equals to non-flying, equals to Museum static display? Plenty of museums display genuine wartime 109s.

You'd be surprised if you knew how many "genuine flying wartime 109s" delivered by Mtt were bits and pieces of this or that but never really fit to any specific model exactly. For example, G-6 with G-10 wings and AS cowling and so on...

JZG_Thiem
01-12-2008, 01:15 PM
Ugly-Kid, that was pretty much what i was referring too. The G6 of the Mtt Stiftung with the larger oil cooler of the G10, due to requirements to give it more lifetime.

Regarding "black 6" i was referring to an (well, ex) flyable *genuine* 109. I know of no other wartime 109 that was flayble for the last 10 or 20y. "Black 6" was the last/only one i know of.

Interesting however what you reported about volvo and producing DB engines. do you happen to have more info about that?

Ugly_Kid
01-12-2008, 01:19 PM
For example,

http://www.ipmsstockholm.org/magazine/2000/02/stuff_eng_detail_j21.htm
"At the same time the Air Force arranged for purchase and license production of Daimler Benz engines from Germany. This finally resulted in the purchase of seventy-plus DB 605B engines of 1475 hp in 1943 and a contract for license production. Actually, the first Swedish-made engine wasn't delivered until after the war."

They built DB 605 engines after the war for J21

JG53Frankyboy
01-12-2008, 01:50 PM
after the war the swiss tried to purchase new build DB605 engines in Sweden - each engine would have cost 191.000 sFr.

well, they bought 130 P-51Ds instead , each 17.000 sFr ............. easy math http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

MB_Avro_UK
01-12-2008, 03:19 PM
Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
This site makes an excellent job listing the existing 109s... there are a lot more of them I have imagined originally, but not keeping such a high profile.

http://www.preservedaxisaircraft.com/Luftwaffe/messerschmitt/messerschmitt.htm

A 109K that also survived is currently under restoration from what I`ve heard.

Thanks for the link http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Don't forget that Franco's Spain flew 109s until the late 1960s. Ironically, they were powered by Rolls Royce Merlin engines. They also flew He 111s also powered by Merlin engines.

These 109s were used in the Battle of Britain film made in 1969. Examples exist today.

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

leitmotiv
01-12-2008, 03:57 PM
Why so rare? I thought they were usually served well done to charred.

buzzsaw1939
01-12-2008, 04:21 PM
I can remember when the war was over, people were liveing in the now.

The night mare was over, not too many people were thinking in terms of collectable history.

Ratsack
01-12-2008, 05:14 PM
Food and heating are on a different order of importance to the preservation of a Nazi relic, which is how a 109 would've been seen in 45.

cheers,
Ratsack

cawimmer430
01-13-2008, 04:36 AM
I met an older man recently who was a kid at the end of World War II. There was a small airfield in my region of Germany and according to him there were hundreds of them littered across the place because of the lack of fuel. Some were cannibalized for spare parts too. When the Americans moved in, the planes were destroyed according to him. I guess these must have been run-of-the-mill G6's and no interesting K4 models. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Xiolablu3
01-13-2008, 01:46 PM
Restored 109's usually seem to have a serious accident after a short period http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I guess its related to the WW2 era 109's accident rate too...Sad cos I love them..

Kurfurst__
01-14-2008, 03:53 AM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
I guess these must have been run-of-the-mill G6's and no interesting K4 models. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

What was particularly interesting of the K-4 for them (or the D-9 for that matter?) 'Novelties' like faired undercarriage? A slightly modified version of an engine that was in existance for 7 years..? Even in the Luftwaffe the attitude was something like 'huh, they moved the electric switchbox to my right, well that`s pretty neat..'. Once I saw an Allied photo of a 109 after the war, the description says '109. Has wheel well doors..?' Pretty much sums it up.

The planes that were interesting to them were the ones without propellers.

amilaninia
01-14-2008, 11:41 AM
Originally posted by Von_Rat:
werent p51s in service with some south american airforces well into the seventies?

Besides the P-51s, a large variety of other WWII aircraft were also used in Latin America up until early
70's including F-4U, P-47, T-6 Texan, B-26B, P-47, P-38 and PBY-5A, mainly during El Salvador-Honduras war, and Guatemala's civil war. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif
Here is an interesting link to learn more on this topic:
http://www.acig.org/artman/publish/cat_index_11.shtml

Krt_Bong
01-14-2008, 12:48 PM
Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
Restored 109's usually seem to have a serious accident after a short period http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I guess its related to the WW2 era 109's accident rate too...Sad cos I love them..
Kinda like the gentlemen who are still left that know how to fly them, heard that the one that was most recently lost/damaged due to accident had a 79 year old pilot because he was the only one qualified to fly it

Herr_Falke
01-14-2008, 08:05 PM
You need a 109? Have I get a deal for you! Several of these are for sale! Note: Some might need a little work.

http://www.adlertag.de/heute/restoration.htm

http://www.fighterfactory.com/aircraft-for-sale/forsale-bf109g.html

http://www.preservedaxisaircraft.com/Luftwaffe/messerschmitt/me109.htm

If it's just ww2 aircraft, try this site. http://www.huntaircraftrecovery.com/bell_p63c_for_sale.htm

cawimmer430
01-15-2008, 05:18 AM
Originally posted by Kurfurst__:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:
I guess these must have been run-of-the-mill G6's and no interesting K4 models. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

What was particularly interesting of the K-4 for them (or the D-9 for that matter?) 'Novelties' like faired undercarriage? A slightly modified version of an engine that was in existance for 7 years..? Even in the Luftwaffe the attitude was something like 'huh, they moved the electric switchbox to my right, well that`s pretty neat..'. Once I saw an Allied photo of a 109 after the war, the description says '109. Has wheel well doors..?' Pretty much sums it up.

The planes that were interesting to them were the ones without propellers. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You're the man, Kurfurst. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

zardozid
01-15-2008, 05:35 AM
German's (like the Italians and Japanese) where not allowed to own (ex)-military aircraft after the war...I'm sure that their would have been MORE then one interested pilot (enthusiast) that would have loved to own (and maybe fly) an ME109 or FW190...in fact I'm sure that many ex-military pilots would have loved to own an ex-military transport for business purposes...work was hard to come by after the war.

luftluuver
01-15-2008, 05:37 AM
What was so novel about faired undercarriages? The Fw190 had them long before the 109. The P-47, P-51, Typhoon, Tempest, I-16 and Macchi C200 to name some others had them.

BOA_Allmenroder
01-15-2008, 08:54 AM
A couple of years ago there was a Bf 109 going for about $1.5 million US on Aircraft shopper online (www.aso.com). It was flyable and flying at the time.

In the data section it mentioned that it was using an original DB engine that was discovered in the later '90s or early 2000 or so in Italy in an old warehouse.

The DB engine was in the original packing crate etc etc, when it was found.

Lasted about 6 months or a year at this site then vanished.

FPSOLKOR
01-15-2008, 08:56 AM
Originally posted by Fighterduck:
But my thought was: well, during ww2 33.000 bf109 were build. On the other hand 15,875 p51 were build and 20,351 Spitfire for England. So the double of p51 number of the german fighter were build but only few can fly..compared to the 160 p51 that can still fly. The same thought can be made for the Fw 190.

So why this plane is so rare? its only for the fact that it has a lesser long post-war life? ... For the same reason why Il-2 is so rare (36 000 built)

Wepps
01-15-2008, 10:01 AM
I don't have a link to it but I remember in 2001 a report about that. It turned out the museum in London had a Bf109 that was built in 1943, but wasn't operational, though it was completely original.

They decided to actually restore the aircraft to flying status, and sent the engine to Rolls Royce to have them evaluate it.

The report actually stated this:

"The engine can be restored, due mainly to the fact that the crankshaft is still in operating condition. If this weren't the case, it would be impossible."

Why?

Because, with MODERN DAY LASER TECHNOLOGY, Rolls Royce could not possibly match the tolerances on the crankshaft - that in 1943 the Germans did BY HAND.

LOL.

Gotta love those Germans.

ElAurens
01-15-2008, 10:41 AM
No, the real reason is that the tooling to repair Hirth type segmented crankshafts no longer exists.

It's the same reason that no steam shop in the US can replace or turn the steel outer rims on steam locomotives anymore. The tooling no longer exists.

If someone wanted to badly enough, and had a few spare millions of dollars to spend, the tooling to remake DB/Hirth type roller bearing cranks could be built.

I assure you that modern techniques are far more precise than anything done in the 1940s.

I suggest taking a look at the tolerances inside a modern Rolls Royce turbofan engine, for example. Nothing the Germans had in the '40s could replicate that.

Kurfurst__
01-15-2008, 11:30 AM
So what`s the special thing about these crankshafts, why can`t these just cast or machined by hand...?

Maybe naive question, but I am not anywhere near an automotive engineer.

Wepps
01-15-2008, 12:07 PM
Ask Rolls Royce http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

You know, these days my memory is...something something.

But I get so tired of being disputed on facts that I know to be true, without anybody bothering to do the homework and GO LOOK IT UP!

In fact, I think it was at one time posted on these forums as a direct quotation from RR.

Bremspropeller
01-15-2008, 01:41 PM
Because it's an aviation part.
Aviation-parts have to be certified.
You just can't go and make tools or parts on your own at will.

Certification requires a whole set of tests (can you write "expensive" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif?).
I'm not quite sure how the FAA or EASA handle "experimental" a/c-parts but I guess there are still some safety-issues involved.

A friend of mine told me that he knows some guy who lives in Freising who wanted to build an ENTIRE 109 from the scratch.
Not only that, he also wanted to build the engine on his own.


I was like "WTF???" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif


Appearantly this guy has too much money, but if he succeeds...another airworthy 109 might be around in a few years http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

ElAurens
01-15-2008, 03:42 PM
The DB series aero engines used roller bearings, not the more common shell type bearings (I.E. "Vandervell bearings"). This requires a segmented, multi-piece, dissassembleable crankshaft. (The post war Porsche 356 Carrera 4 cam had a similar set up).
This type of crankshaft is insanely expensive to produce, and requires very specialized tooling, none of which exists anymore.

Any modern racing engine builder, or Rolls Royce for that matter, could build the tooling and produce this type of crankshaft. However, as I said, it would take millions of dollars to do so, and this cost cannot be justified for the production of a few dozen (if that) crankshafts for DB powered WW2 aircraft.

It would probably be a little less costly to convert the DBs to a plain bearing type crankshaft and have new connecting rods manufactured that would accept that type of bearing.

BTW, as most WW2 fighters are classed as "EXPERIMENTAL" aircraft by the FAA, you can do about anything you like to them, if you have the cash.

It's all about the money Gents. Not the inability of modern manufacturing.