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XyZspineZyX
09-10-2003, 10:24 PM
Maybe this should be in the Bug Section or has been mentioned before but...

I was trying night landing in a bunch of different planes and noticed that if you fire close to the ground in a P-40 or FW-190, the terrain lights up for hundreds of yards ahead. Not in an IL2 or P-47, only in some planes.

Also, it only works from the cockpit view. Anyway, I guess this is what flares will look like in LOMAC.



"Official Lancaster Whiner"

XyZspineZyX
09-10-2003, 10:24 PM
Maybe this should be in the Bug Section or has been mentioned before but...

I was trying night landing in a bunch of different planes and noticed that if you fire close to the ground in a P-40 or FW-190, the terrain lights up for hundreds of yards ahead. Not in an IL2 or P-47, only in some planes.

Also, it only works from the cockpit view. Anyway, I guess this is what flares will look like in LOMAC.



"Official Lancaster Whiner"

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 12:52 AM
What I'm curious about...why is the illuminated instrument cluster in the aircraft green and not red?

Red has always been the standard for improving night vision. I realize we are sitting at a computer screen, but since we have all this so-called realism twist to everything... why not red? /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

-------------------- /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 01:01 AM
Probably because the dials used flourescent coatings of Zinc Sulphide(standard flourescent material in the early part of thelast centuary). Zinc Sulphide glows green. I don't know the exact mechanism, but they probably had some kind of small UV bulb to activate the ZnS. Technically, it's no more complicated than the floursecent dials used in alarm clocks.

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XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 01:10 AM
Just turn the monitor brightness up. You can even see in blackout.

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XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 01:14 AM
Ya, I guess I could do that.

But try it out. Fly a P-40 at low level in total darkness and watch the ground light up. Must be a bug. Cockpit view only though.



"Official Lancaster Whiner"

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 02:37 AM
I think this only goes to prove that the P40's guns are in fact ELECTRIC TORCHES with a STROBE and the sound is made by SPEAKERS behind the pilot! http://ubbxforums.ubi.com/infopop/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

It's actually because the guns cause the windscreen to brighten, and this combines with the scene outside to effectively lighten the environment. It's not really like LOMAC flares.

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 09:02 AM
Your right whoever said aircraft lights inside are red, they are. The paint used on instruments was actually radioactive and therefore glowed on its own without any need for 'UV' lights.

They did however put small 24v red lamps around the cockpit that could be used to read instruments and maps, they used red lamps because red as a colour does not impede your night vision. So after looking into the cockpit you can look out of the aircraft and still see, which was pretty handy really.

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 12:39 PM
AFAIK (and it seems this way in Janes WW2F) the lights
should be red, but the phosphor will be green, as that
was the common colour for available phosphors at the
time AFAIK (including ones including radioactive material).
It seems that the cockpit lighting seems to make the phosphors
visible rather than anything else. That might just be a way
to simply the graphics engine (in the same way that muzzle
flashes are overdone for day, as they seem to be intended
to carry a degree of night blinding effect to simulate
muzzle flashes ruining your vision at night?)

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 02:38 PM
Red light does not improve night vision, it only erodes it more slowly than regular white light.

Red is not the only color that can be (or is) used to help preserve night vision. Blue and green are also used because they work just as well.

Some recent reseach has suggested that very low intensity white light (so dim as to be almost unnoticable before you've adapted to the dark) is actually better and safer than any monochromatic light for night use. It's dim enough not to destroy your night vision, and it doesn't completely screw up your ability to see colors correctly.

If you've ever tried to read red text or a red course line on a chart at night with only a red light (anything red effectively disappears), you'll understand the value of a dim white light over a brighter red one.

XyZspineZyX
09-11-2003, 05:45 PM
I'm an astronomer by profession, and the reason why people recommend red light is because the eyes are least sensitive to red light. They are more sensitive to blue light, and show peak sensitivity to green light. Red light is most effective when it's intensity is so low that the illuminated objects appear gray ie. only the rods in your eyes are picking light up. The cones (these are the structure responsible for colour vision) are less sensitive to light than the rods are. Therefore to get the best night vision possible, one has to use a red light dim enough that the material it's shining on appears gray. I've spent hours and hours out in the open with my telescope drawing nebulea and clusters in the sky, and trust me, white liht is not what you want for night vision.

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