PDA

View Full Version : Were WWII-era pilots really this childish?



jarink
02-06-2008, 10:00 AM
My dad sent me a scan of this booklet, which I have also found on the web. It's called:
I've Got Wings (http://www.303rdbg.com/wings01.html) and was issued in 1943.

Looking through this thing, you'd think it was intended for little kids. No, it was actually given to PILOTS that had graduated from Advanced Flying Schools!!!
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Some choice examples...
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings01.jpg

This is a "Control Tower"
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings06.jpg

Galloping Golfish!
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings11.jpg

Airplanes and Rotorplanes - that's us!
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings22.jpg

Eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh!
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings30.jpg

This is NOT contact flight!
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings48.jpg

Did I forget myself?
http://www.303rdbg.com/wings71.jpg


I am laugh.

horseback
02-06-2008, 11:30 AM
Well, considering that most aviation cadets of the era were late teens-early twenties, it's not entirely unreasonable. Besides, the point is to get the material across in a memorable way.

Childish? Considering what they accomplished, and the sacrifices they had to make, maybe it's fairer to go with 'silly'.

cheers

horseback

Crash_Moses
02-06-2008, 11:35 AM
Priceless! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I had five years in the Marines and I've seen worse. Gotta teach to the lowest common denominator...which would be me. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

Cajun76
02-06-2008, 11:50 AM
Crash Moses knows. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif That's when it was still Army Air Force.

I've seen pamphlets from when my father was in the Army. Talking Hummers and Tanks going on about maintenance intervals. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

All the US services have flying machines, however one must refer to them by type they recognize.

In the USAF, we have "fixed wing" aircraft.
In the Army, they have "rotary wing" aircraft.
In the Navy, they have both "rotary wing" and "fixed wing" aircraft.

In the Marine Corps, they have "Urrr Ugh Grrrrr"

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Friendly_flyer
02-06-2008, 11:53 AM
The cartonns make you smile. Things that you have smiled at tends to stick, because we like the feeling of smiling. I tell silly jokes all the time when I teach, knowing that some of the pupils would like to retell the joke, which will make them remember the scientific the joke was about in the first place.

zardozid
02-06-2008, 11:56 AM
That looks like the work of comic artist "Wally Wood"...
http://www.acomics.com/6.jpg

He worked at "EC" comics for years and was one of the artists who drew for the "Mad" comic book (before it was a magazine) in the 1950's...
His work here (http://www.pigdogproductions.com/wally%20wood.html).

Metatron_123
02-06-2008, 12:02 PM
That is really funny!

Which reminds me- didn't Nowotny's wingman have a callsign - ''Quax'' based on a cartoon character that always crashes?

I would like to see the Luftwaffe equivalent to this.

jolly_magpie
02-06-2008, 12:06 PM
Wallace Wood was the greatest comic artist of all time! I don't think these are his work. He graduated high school in 1944.

zardozid
02-06-2008, 12:48 PM
Originally posted by jolly_magpie:
Wallace Wood was the greatest comic artist of all time! I don't think these are his work. He graduated high school in 1944.

your probably right...I confused him with "Harvey Kurtzman" or "Jack Davis"...He was another artist with "Mad" comic book.

jolly_magpie
02-06-2008, 02:41 PM
Yeah, just think of the average talent level of the old ECs and MAD. Mind boggling.

DuxCorvan
02-06-2008, 02:58 PM
Guys, you have to consider that mass media and all that's happened through these last decades has quite 'spoiled' our ability to find humor and enjoyment in very simple, innocent things. We are 'wicked' in the sense that we have been assaulted since childhood with lots of witty remarks, twisted jokes and sex & politics innuendos. In the 40s youths were probably more mature than today in the sense of commitment and responsibility, but considerably more naive in things like humor and chatting, and far more able to be impressed, amused or shocked by readings, jokes or movie scenes that we now find totally harmless or silly.

Curiously, though graphic violence or sex were mostly banned from society, death was far more a daily thing for them, who were used to have people dying at home and then keep watch on the bodies of their beloved. Now we hide the dying people in hospitals, and box them ASAP, so we can live watching death just on TV, this is, fictionalizing it. These guys were far more tough than we are, don't judge them for the simple things that made them laugh.

The guys who died in the WW1 trenches laughed with the Keystone cops, cake wars, and the like.

leitmotiv
02-06-2008, 03:32 PM
As with today, if you want to make a simple point, reduce it to essentials. Our brains are so cluttered simple cartoons can make more sense to everybody because it is a slogan combined with an image---basic advertising/propaganda psychology. Would I want to have basics of survival put to me in something like a 400 page treatise on air combat maneuvering? HELL NO. Driver's manuals in California use the same technique. The image grabs our restless eye, we are visually-oriented critters.

http://www.adblogarabia.com/wp-content/ImaPC..ImaMac.jpg

I doubt if anybody is a bigger klutz/dunce than I, Crash Moses!

SeaFireLIV
02-06-2008, 03:33 PM
What Dux said. It`s a different world today.

HayateAce
02-06-2008, 04:01 PM
http://www.esatclear.ie/~godot/71.jpg

leitmotiv
02-06-2008, 04:02 PM
Nothing has changed at all. Same rules for comprehension, same visual animal, same brain which responds to simple slogans. Our hardware is the same. It is sentimental twaddle generated by dillweeds like Stephen Ambrose who have created this illusion of a "kinder, gentler" generation. See WARTIME by Paul Fussell who was in the U.S. Army in the war for a completely unsentimental view of the period. The crassness of the Second World War mentality created the cynicism of my 1960s generation. The adults left us with no illusions, bless 'em. CATCH-22 was the epitome of this mentality.

http://i154.photobucket.com/albums/s261/G6AS/376790018_67d08e0c76.jpg

DHC2Pilot
02-06-2008, 05:08 PM
Back then, comics were EXTREMELY popular with kids, teenagers, and those in their early 20's. By todays standards this type of brochure would seem "dumbed down", but back then this was mainstream. Look at some of the old advertisements in magazines - almost nothing contained real life images of the product they were selling - everything was hand drawn images. Propaganda flyers usually had cartoonish images of Stalin, Hitler, etc. Personally I love this era as some of the most memorable artwork you will ever see flourished.

DHC2Pilot
02-06-2008, 05:13 PM
A footnote to my above post.....
For all of the real life pilots out there, I'm sure you've seen Kershner's flight manuals. I've got a couple old copies and they're filled with cartoonish drawings demonstrating all of the various concepts a beginning pilot will need to learn. It's actually far easier to learn this way instead of having extremely technical manuals that drone on and on forever putting the reader into a hypnotic trance.

jarink
02-06-2008, 06:31 PM
Good points all, but when looking at these, I had the mental image of what a hot-shot nugget pilot straight out of Advance Training would have thought when he sees a page that tells him

<span class="ev_code_yellow">"This is a control tower"</span>

There's simple and then there's simplistic.
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

Actually, once you start getting past the first 20 pages or so, the topics do get a lot more meaningful. I remember the Army's PS Magazine (https://www.logsa.army.mil/psmag/pshome.cfm) (Preventive Maintenance; I think it was originally Preventive Servicing) cartoon mags from the 80s and 90s; this booklet seems similar in approach (cartoon format with humorous text).
http://www.fightingfeynmans.com/img/PS/ninjas.jpg

M_Gunz
02-06-2008, 06:33 PM
Originally posted by jarink:
Looking through this thing, you'd think it was intended for little kids. No, it was actually given to PILOTS that had graduated from Advanced Flying Schools!!!
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

That is what someone decided was needed, maybe by their cousin, so it was done.

Have you seen the Disney 1942 training film on the Boys AT Rifle? It's on Youtube in parts.

Don't wonder about the pilots, wonder about the government that contracted and the studio dweebs
that made those training materials. They are visual aids, not the lessons.

M_Gunz
02-06-2008, 06:42 PM
Originally posted by DHC2Pilot:
Look at some of the old advertisements in magazines - almost nothing contained real life images of the product they were selling - everything was hand drawn images.

Some, yes and maybe in some places that was all but I've been through my Grandmother's old WWII
era National Geographics and the ads contained a lot of photo work! Lincoln was selling a V-16
back then and the ad does not have a crude hand drawing. The artwork in the ads was near on
par with the artwork of the articles, just more B&W work. You can buy every issue made btw,
on DVD's.

zardozid
02-06-2008, 07:12 PM
This page (http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-recruits/comic01.htm)
makes the point that not everyone had the same level of education back then...not everyone had read a book, but everyone had read a comic book...

buzzsaw1939
02-06-2008, 10:20 PM
I can't belive no one has mentioned the greatest war aviation cartoonest of all time, Bob Stevens! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

TC_Stele
02-07-2008, 01:07 AM
I wouldn't laugh at this stuff. Visuals in a simple manner were a way of getting a point across. Today we have all the resources in the world to do that, but back then when you wanted visuals you had to hire a good artist to do it, and you had to come up with slogans and information with what limited resources you had. The networking back then was not like it is today.

My father was an artist during the WW2 era and became a commercial artist after the war. Today he is amazed at how relatively easy artists have it today with so many resources they have.

jarink
02-07-2008, 07:50 AM
Originally posted by zardozid:
This page (http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-recruits/comic01.htm)
makes the point that not everyone had the same level of education back then...not everyone had read a book, but everyone had read a comic book...

I would hope that pilots that had graduated from at least 2 flying courses (Basic and Advanced) would have read more than a comic book....

It seems a lot of you are mistaking my intent. I haven't meant to suggest that pilots back then were morons, or that "graphic novels" aren't an effective way to pass along information to the troops, but some of the stuff in this booklet seems geared more towards a 3rd grader than a pilot.

Krt_Bong
02-07-2008, 08:48 AM
I had a copy of a Mustang Pilots Manual and it had much the same style of cartoonish drawings depicting many things about flying the aircraft that would be considered important: things like time spent inverted, landing with brakes on etc..had humorous illustrations depicting what might happen if you failed to heed warning placards. Like stated previously it was a simpler time so these things are not so silly.

Crash_Moses
02-07-2008, 09:00 AM
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y125/Crash_Moses/Image89.gif

Airmail109
02-07-2008, 09:56 AM
Some of you guys dont get it do you.

Lots and lots of Fighter pilots are INSANELY childish. In fact every single ex-fighter pilot I know IS childish.

Even world war 2 pilots were childish, you only have to read stories such as The Kid Hofer dressing his dog up as a pilot and sticking it on his lap then forming up with a training flight.

One of the ex fighter pilots I know used to go round with a blow up spitfire in his car and stick it out his window as his horn sounded like a machine gun. Another one, was the most grounded fighter pilot at the time for doing all sorts of "maverick" type stuff....buzzing towns and flying under bridges etc.

Only sensible pilots in the RAF seem to be Harrier pilots.

Bewolf
02-07-2008, 10:32 AM
About comics and a related note, here are parts of a comics in a project to bring the suubject more interestingly to children.

http://www.spiegel.de/fotostrecke/0,5538,28602,00.html

So comics indeed carry another message then mere books.

Warrington_Wolf
02-07-2008, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by Aimail101:
Only sensible pilots in the RAF seem to be Harrier pilots.
You have obviously never seen this clip then, the British government went nuts when it was put on the net.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LMEgp_tGDw4