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dglasal
04-14-2006, 12:53 PM
Just picked up the book on Finnish Ace Hans Wind: "Ace Eagle - Hasse Wind." Hans Wind scored a total of 75 kills during the Continuation War, in two phases. Phase one as a Brewster pilot during '41-'43 where he scored 36 kills. In late '43 he was pulled from front line duty in order to train new fighter pilots. Returning to the front in February 1944 and now flying a Bf-109G, Hans scored an additional 39 kills be the end of the war. One amazing aspect of his career is that he scored 36 kills in one month (June 1944).

During his tenure as an instructor, Hasse Wind presented his students with the following guidelines:

General Topics:
1. Always wear your complete flight gear
2. Verify that the plane is fully combat ready
3. Rememberon whose wing you are flying
4. The ordered takeoff sequnce
5. Remember that when you're on ground alert you are not allowed to move away from the alarm phone, anywhere, except to your own plane.

Takeoff:
1. Make sure that you takeoff, only when it's your turn.
2. After taking-off, fly straight ahead for a little while, so that the pilots taking-off behind you will have enough room to maneuver.
3. Watch the gauges and mike sure that the engine is running smoothly. If not, you must land immediately.
4. Pay attention to where your lead plane is and hurry up to take your own position on its wing.

Search Mission:
1. The lookout sector for each plane is 360 degrees.
2. You'll best find the enemy by not trusting your fellow pilot's eyesight.
3. Always remember to watch your high and low six o'clock.
4. In clear weather, be prepared for surprises out of the sun.

Intercept Mission
1. Know the enemy altitude, number of aircraft and their types when alerted.
2. Takeoff in a hurry.
3. Forming-up is done during the flight to the intercept point.
4. Combat altitude is reached during the flight and is based on radio reports about the enemy.
5. Flight formation is tighter than during a search flight in order to achieve a united and powerful strike.

Escort Mission.
1. Escort aircraft are always in sight of the escorted aircraft.
2. At least one section or element must always act as a close escort.
3. Only join in combat out of necessity and even then only for defensive purposes, disengaging at the first opportunity.

Performing Air Combat:
1. Solo fighting:
a. I-16/I-153: get behind, adjust speed to slightly fasting than they are, after shooting, continue past the aircraft, gaining altitude. Do not try to sharply turn as these aircraft are much more maneuverable.
b. In-Line aircraft (migs/laggs/yaks) Fast but not as maneuverable. The only way to fight and succeed against these types of aircraft is to bounce them from above and start shooting at a very close range. Aim for the engine as even one hit normally is enough to degrade the performance of the aircraft. Do not go head to head as they are equipped with a cannon.
c. Marksmanship:
1. ALways keep both eyes open while shooting.
2. Don't jerk the plane around with sudden movements while aiming, instead, handle it smoothly and gently.
3. Don't get carried away while shooting, and always keep an eye on your six o'clock position so that nobody can get behind your tail.
4. Never use tracers to aim. You can check your lead by watching the path of the tracers, but always correct your aim with your gun-sight.
5. When shooting from the six o'clock position directly behind the enemy, it is best to get within 20 yards where his prop-wash that was shaking your plane earlier, wettles down. It is like getting from "heavy seas" into a calm "Backwater."

Four ways to gaining surprise
1. Advance at a low level, masked by the terrain
2. Using the clouds
3. Coming from the sun
4. Flying at a high altitude and diving from there with great speed, perferably with the sun behind our back.

Attacking bombers: from behind and below. Take out the rear gunner first, then go for the engines.

I have always been impressed with the quality of the small but very effective Finnish fighter force. Altogether, the Finnish Airforce produced 96 aces, which is quoted as being the world record when taken in relationship with the total number of Finnish pilots and national population.

GerritJ9
04-15-2006, 03:26 AM
If you haven't done so yet, download the "Hasse Wind" single mission from www.airwarfare.com (http://www.airwarfare.com). It's a very tough mission. Don't worry about the Hurricanes too much, they are no match for the B-239. But watch out for the I-16s, they are the real danger.

JG52Karaya-X
04-15-2006, 04:18 AM
Originally posted by GerritJ9:
Don't worry about the Hurricanes too much, they are no match for the B-239. But watch out for the I-16s, they are the real danger.

Actually in FB now the HurriIIc outmanoeuvers AND outruns the B239, and the 4x20mm will make mince meat out of you in a quarter of a second... I wouldn't take them so lightly http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

GerritJ9
04-15-2006, 09:05 AM
The Hurricanes in "Hasse Wind" are IIBs, not IICs. As for the IICs, I disagree. The final mission in the "Brewster" campaign is a one-on-one between a Hurricane IIC and a B-239. The first time I flew it, I thought the IIC was a IIB and got chewed up by the four 20s. But after reflying, and knowing what I was facing, it was all over. All I had to do was stay out of the line of fire during the head-on approach, then get on the IIC's tail which is dead easy thanks to the B-239's tighter turning circle. Once you're on a Hurricane's tail, it's goodbye Hurricane. The only times I lose, apart from that first time, is when I don't watch my altitude carefully enough or fly into a chimney http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

general_kalle
04-15-2006, 10:25 AM
its fun with that finnish airforce
it flyes german(Bf109), US(Brewster) and russian(I153) planes and fights...Russian planes but bothe the united states and germany supported them...US and russia is allied http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Gawwad
04-15-2006, 10:36 AM
Originally posted by general_kalle:
its fun with that finnish airforce
it flyes german(Bf109), US(Brewster) and russian(I153) planes and fights...Russian planes but bothe the united states and germany supported them...US and russia is allied http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

The russian planes were either captured by Finns them selfs or Germans had captured them and sold to Finland.
And I think the Brewsters were bought from Britain which, if my memory serves me right, declared war on Finland later in the war.
But anyway, Finland had planes from all the countries in the war http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

dglasal
04-15-2006, 11:51 AM
The Finns received 44 Brewsters, bought from the US, and begun to arrive in crates on 6 April 1940. The Finns needed "modern" fighter aircraft as a result of fighting the Soviets during the "Winter War" of 1939. Since everyone needed such fighters and Finland lack of funds, the Brewsters were accepted because 1) no one else wanted them and 2) they were cheap. Though the aircraft arrived too late to participate in the "Winter War" they were available for the "Continuation War" and were very successful (pilots, pilots, pilots). I believe, on average, the Finns operated around 100 fighter aircraft at any one time. I know that for the Soviet summer offensive in 1944, they had around this number.

Yes, I have been flying a campaign as a Brewster pilot and find the aircraft fun and quite easy to handle and land.

GerritJ9
04-16-2006, 03:20 AM
Not quite, Gawwad...... there was NOT ONE aeroplane in the Finnish inventory that had a "made in Japan" label! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

HotelBushranger
04-16-2006, 05:48 AM
I TOLD you, B-239 is the best!

The USA wanted to sell Finland the Brewsters, but because of isolationist laws, the USA was prohibited from selling modern fighters to other countries. So, they were declared obsolete and sold to the Finns for a dollar a piece http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

For more Hans Wind stuff, see here:
http://www.virtualpilots.fi/hist/WW2History-CaptainWind...tTacticsLecture.html (http://www.virtualpilots.fi/hist/WW2History-CaptainWindsAirCombatTacticsLecture.html)

triggerhappyfin
04-16-2006, 10:45 AM
The story of the FAF is an interesting one. At the beginning of hostilities Russians outnumbedred FAF with some incredible numbers. VVS had some 3000+ aircraft to put against FAF´s only frontline fighter unit LeLv 24´s about 40 aircraft. The FAF´s striking force grew somewhat during the time but remained heavily outnumbered by VVS throughout the entire war. Still the Finnish pilots managed to deter VVS attempts to get airsuperiority(whith they never gained). For lengths of periods VVS were unable to leave areas covered by their owne aaa. In doing so they soon became deadmeat to the Finnish pilots.
The Finnish pilots as their German colleques were to remain in duty as long as war held on.
No relief in numbers of sorties to be done but if you were skilled enough o fly a fighter you had to continue to the bitter end. Still the majority of the Finnish pilots managed to survive the war. Through out the whole conflict bringing havoc to their counterparts. Saying this I in no way want to despite the efforts of VVS during WW2(which I truly think was important to bring Hitler down). But still the efforts by guys as Wind are astounding to me.

HotelBushranger
04-17-2006, 03:05 AM
Salute! Agree 100%

Also, more credit than can be told should also be given to the erks, the ground crew that kept the aircraft running in primitive conditions-especially the Winter War, which was the coldest winter on record http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

The success of the fighter pilots can be in most parts attributed to their strict training doctrine, which bred flying skill and remarkable accuracy. The training program being developed be Major G. Magnusson, the "father" of that FAF.

AnaK774
04-17-2006, 05:13 AM
Originally posted by dglasal:

c. Marksmanship:
1. ALways keep both eyes open while shooting.
2. Don't jerk the plane around with sudden movements while aiming, instead, handle it smoothly and gently.
3. Don't get carried away while shooting, and always keep an eye on your six o'clock position so that nobody can get behind your tail.
4. Never use tracers to aim. You can check your lead by watching the path of the tracers, but always correct your aim with your gun-sight.
5. When shooting from the six o'clock position directly behind the enemy, it is best to get within 20 yards where his prop-wash that was shaking your plane earlier, wettles down. It is like getting from "heavy seas" into a calm "Backwater."



Really good stuff there, m8.

If all were following those advices, you would get really fast results and much less whines about weapon effeciency. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

AndyHigh
04-18-2006, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
countries. So, they were declared obsolete and sold to the Finns for a dollar a piece http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif


I think this is an old myth which is often repeated. In fact they were sold for 54000$/plane, for a total price of 3.4M$. So it was not really free aid.

HotelBushranger
04-19-2006, 12:48 AM
quote:
Originally posted by HotelBushranger:
countries. So, they were declared obsolete and sold to the Finns for a dollar a piece Googly



I think this is an old myth which is often repeated. In fact they were sold for 54000$/plane, for a total price of 3.4M$. So it was not really free aid.

Rightio mate, thanks for clearing it up. Strange though, because even a Finnish video I've got on the Continuation War states this http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif Ah well, thanks anyway http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

TheGozr
04-19-2006, 01:05 AM
When shooting from the six o'clock position directly behind the enemy, it is best to get within 20 yards where his prop-wash that was shaking your plane earlier, wettles down. It is like getting from "heavy seas" into a calm "Backwater."

Four ways to gaining surprise
1. Advance at a low level, masked by the terrain
2. Using the clouds
3. Coming from the sun
4. Flying at a high altitude and diving from there with great speed, perferably with the sun behind our back.

Well you'll find all this in the NormandieNiemen server the only Server made by real pilots .

loppenainen
04-21-2006, 10:35 AM
The B-239 was a private venture by Brewster. The planes were sold to Finland on the basis that any US military equipment on board for trials be removed.

The Wright-cyclone engine was replaced with the non-military version rated 950hp, as on the US naval trial version, xf2a-1.

I recommend www.kolumbus.fi/kari.stenman (http://www.kolumbus.fi/kari.stenman) if you want to speak to the engineer and not the oily rag.