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Bo_Nidle
02-20-2007, 06:28 PM
I live on the edges of the Staffordshire Moorlands. The moors encompass the Peak District National Park and in summer are very picturesque but there are some comparatively remote places that can be cut off in winter. The winter of 1947 was particularly bad requiring food drops to villages cut off by the snow. The mercy mission was not entirely without risk and the crew of one RAF Halifax paid the ultimate price. They are still remembered to this day.

A special memorial service was held to mark the 60th anniversary of the tragedy.

From the Staffordshire Evening Sentinel 19 Feb 2007

"TRIBUTES PAID 60 YEARS AFTER AID PLANE TRAGEDY


09:40 - 19 February 2007
Parishioners packed out a church during a special ceremony to mark the 60th anniversary of a tragic air crash.A service of Holy Communion was held at All Saints' Church, Grindon, yesterday to mark the tragedy, which took place on February 13, 1947.

More than 100 people braved the biting cold yesterday to remember those who died and give thanks for the sacrifice they paid.

The crash involved an RAF Halifax RT922, belonging to 47 Squadron, which was delivering vital food supplies to villagers cut off following heavy snowfalls. All eight people on board were killed.

Donald McIntyre, a son of Squadron Leader Don McIntyre who was piloting the plane, was present at the ceremony.

The 61-year-old, who lives in Halifax, said: "I was only two-years-old when my father died, and I didn't find out until 1998 where the crash had happened.

"I've been coming here on the nearest Sunday to the crash date to take part in the ceremonies ever since.I missed the 40th and 50th anniversaries and I don't expect there will be another large one after this year's because the people who witnessed the accident are becoming fewer - but that won't stop me coming here every year.It's very gratifying and heartwarming to see so many people turning up for the ceremony, and not only people from this area.I do think it's important that events such as these are held, to remember those who gave their lives for others."

After the service - which was led by the Lord Bishop of Lichfield, the Right Reverend Jonathan Gledhill - the congregation gathered to witness a fly-past by 47 Squadron in a C130K Hercules as it passed the church.

Representatives from the Lyneham-based squadron, along with members of the Leek and Waterhouses branches of the Royal British Legion and the Leek Air Training Corps, stood to attention with their standards as it flew overhead towards the site of the crash.

A commemorative cairn has been put in place where the plane plunged to the ground and burst into flames in thick fog.

Most of the congregation afterwards made their way to the site to lay wreaths.

Squadron Leader Richard Wells, who is from 47 Squadron and was representing the modern RAF at the ceremony, said: "This was a very respectful and fitting service to remember those who died.

"Current serving members are very honoured and proud to represent the RAF in memory of those who served 60 years ago, and who gave the ultimate sacrifice in giving their lives for others."

Joyce Jones, secretary of Leek RAFA, said it was important to hold such ceremonies.

She said: "Sixty years ago an RAF Halifax crashed here on its way to deliver aid. The crash killed all six servicemen and two press photographers who were on board. You have to remember these things. People gave their lives for us by doing their every day work, and its important that we recognise and acknowledge that."

This memorial now stands where the Halifax came to rest http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/Image504.jpg

An RAF Halifax http://www.circlecity.co.uk/wartime/aircraft/halifax.jpg



Just thought some of you may be interested.

Bo_Nidle
02-20-2007, 06:28 PM
I live on the edges of the Staffordshire Moorlands. The moors encompass the Peak District National Park and in summer are very picturesque but there are some comparatively remote places that can be cut off in winter. The winter of 1947 was particularly bad requiring food drops to villages cut off by the snow. The mercy mission was not entirely without risk and the crew of one RAF Halifax paid the ultimate price. They are still remembered to this day.

A special memorial service was held to mark the 60th anniversary of the tragedy.

From the Staffordshire Evening Sentinel 19 Feb 2007

"TRIBUTES PAID 60 YEARS AFTER AID PLANE TRAGEDY


09:40 - 19 February 2007
Parishioners packed out a church during a special ceremony to mark the 60th anniversary of a tragic air crash.A service of Holy Communion was held at All Saints' Church, Grindon, yesterday to mark the tragedy, which took place on February 13, 1947.

More than 100 people braved the biting cold yesterday to remember those who died and give thanks for the sacrifice they paid.

The crash involved an RAF Halifax RT922, belonging to 47 Squadron, which was delivering vital food supplies to villagers cut off following heavy snowfalls. All eight people on board were killed.

Donald McIntyre, a son of Squadron Leader Don McIntyre who was piloting the plane, was present at the ceremony.

The 61-year-old, who lives in Halifax, said: "I was only two-years-old when my father died, and I didn't find out until 1998 where the crash had happened.

"I've been coming here on the nearest Sunday to the crash date to take part in the ceremonies ever since.I missed the 40th and 50th anniversaries and I don't expect there will be another large one after this year's because the people who witnessed the accident are becoming fewer - but that won't stop me coming here every year.It's very gratifying and heartwarming to see so many people turning up for the ceremony, and not only people from this area.I do think it's important that events such as these are held, to remember those who gave their lives for others."

After the service - which was led by the Lord Bishop of Lichfield, the Right Reverend Jonathan Gledhill - the congregation gathered to witness a fly-past by 47 Squadron in a C130K Hercules as it passed the church.

Representatives from the Lyneham-based squadron, along with members of the Leek and Waterhouses branches of the Royal British Legion and the Leek Air Training Corps, stood to attention with their standards as it flew overhead towards the site of the crash.

A commemorative cairn has been put in place where the plane plunged to the ground and burst into flames in thick fog.

Most of the congregation afterwards made their way to the site to lay wreaths.

Squadron Leader Richard Wells, who is from 47 Squadron and was representing the modern RAF at the ceremony, said: "This was a very respectful and fitting service to remember those who died.

"Current serving members are very honoured and proud to represent the RAF in memory of those who served 60 years ago, and who gave the ultimate sacrifice in giving their lives for others."

Joyce Jones, secretary of Leek RAFA, said it was important to hold such ceremonies.

She said: "Sixty years ago an RAF Halifax crashed here on its way to deliver aid. The crash killed all six servicemen and two press photographers who were on board. You have to remember these things. People gave their lives for us by doing their every day work, and its important that we recognise and acknowledge that."

This memorial now stands where the Halifax came to rest http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/Image504.jpg

An RAF Halifax http://www.circlecity.co.uk/wartime/aircraft/halifax.jpg



Just thought some of you may be interested.

boxmike
02-21-2007, 02:01 PM
Always great to see history will not be forgotten, people will not be forgotten.
Googled this and found out the Peak District is really not a nice place for flying personnel
http://www.peakdistrictaircrashes.co.uk/database1.htm

Rgds,
- box

Heavy_Weather
02-21-2007, 02:23 PM
nice read m8 http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif