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View Full Version : is it me or is navigation bloody difficult? ;-)



deskpilot
12-21-2011, 02:06 PM
I bet some of you guys are ace at it so how do you do it? I'm attempting full real, and honestly after 5 minutes of combat I'm utterly lost and the countryside all looks the same! I don't really want to just ask for the vector to home base. Does anyone use the navigation radio beacon thingies from the latest patch?
Do I need a stopwatch and a paper copy of each map to look at ? I guess I am wondering how much of my spare time learning to navigate in this sim might take. It's all good fun though of course. As always it makes me SO admire the real pilots.

mortoma
12-21-2011, 02:17 PM
Make a note of your general heading when you go to target and fly the reciprocal heading to go back to base. If your general flight direction is 30 degrees to target, then fly home on a heading of about 210 degrees. which is the reciprocal heading of 30.

And if you fly for a while with the same home airfield ( no guarantee though ) then you will quickly memorize geographical features such as river, lakes, forests and cities. That's the best I can tell you really.

WTE_Galway
12-21-2011, 03:09 PM
Always remember:

speed divided by time = distance traveled

Most aircraft have a cockpit clock good enough for time but it pays to get a printed copy of the map (M4T has downloads) and remember that:

- one "map square" at normal zoom is 10km across
- as a rule of thumb you cover 10km (one map square) in 2 minutes at 300km.

Woke_Up_Dead
12-21-2011, 05:16 PM
"Phew, that was a tough, long fight. Damn, where am I? I lost touch with my flight. OK, let's see, I remember the briefing map, it told us to fly pretty far west of the airfield. What do I see below me, hmm, that's a mid-sized town shaped like a crescent, it's right next to a river with a railroad and a road bridge over it, to the south I see a thin strip of forest running east-west, and to the east there is a lake shaped like a **** with one huge testicle pointing north-west. Anything like that on the map, a few grids west of my airbase? Zoom-out, pan, zoom-in, pan, oh, there it is."

TheCrux
12-21-2011, 10:37 PM
Originally posted by Woke_Up_Dead:
"Phew, that was a tough, long fight. Damn, where am I? I lost touch with my flight. OK, let's see, I remember the briefing map, it told us to fly pretty far west of the airfield. What do I see below me, hmm, that's a mid-sized town shaped like a crescent, it's right next to a river with a railroad and a road bridge over it, to the south I see a thin strip of forest running east-west, and to the east there is a lake shaped like a **** with one huge testicle pointing north-west. Anything like that on the map, a few grids west of my airbase? Zoom-out, pan, zoom-in, pan, oh, there it is."

Good advice so far in the posts, but the above missive is the kind of stuff, in my experience, that is the best practical advice.

I'll add 3 main points:

1) Study the map/route 1st and have some kind of plan before you take-off...especially if you have to hand-fly a plane without level stab.

2) Look for a distinctive feature ( like in the above post ) and then find it on the map...not the other way around.

3) If you think you're lost, or are not sure where you are or thought you missed a waypoint: Keep your heading! Don't panic and start frantically maneuvering around. You're probably not as lost as you think....but you WILL be if you start departing from your heading.

FlixFlix
12-22-2011, 12:09 AM
Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
Always remember:

speed divided by time = distance traveled



Uhm not that I want to split hairs here but shouldn't that be speed multiplied by time equals distance? Did I get it all wrong?

FlatSpinMan
12-22-2011, 03:15 AM
Harder in IL2 cos everything looks the same. Riers are all giant and there's so many, towns are often uniform. I find navigating visually in RoF far easier.
Don't forget to check the time of take off then you can factor in the position of the sun to help you with basic directions.

megalopsuche
12-22-2011, 08:19 AM
Originally posted by FlixFlix:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by WTE_Galway:
Always remember:

speed divided by time = distance traveled



Uhm not that I want to split hairs here but shouldn't that be speed multiplied by time equals distance? Did I get it all wrong? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You have it right. Galway fails sixth grade algebra. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

As for navigation, I've never been good at it with the help turned off. The landscape in this sim lacks distinction, and the in-flight maps are next to useless. Why on Earth aren't the mission waypoints displayed on the map? Is it realism for the pilot not to pencil in his path? Really?


I find navigating visually in RoF far easier.

That is what convinced me to turn on the navigation help in Il-2; it showed me that the problem wasn't on my end.

PhantomKira
12-22-2011, 10:41 AM
Four more points:

1. Climb, if possible. The higher you are, the more you can see.

2. It's easy, when you're desperate, to decide that something on the ground is something it actually isn't. You "make it fit", because you want it to, not necessarily because it does. Be careful. As Woke_Up_Dead posted, make sure you have three and four or more degrees of "it fits", so that you're absolutely sure that what you're looking at really is what it appears to be.

3. Having those lines on the map for navigating from point A to point B is perfectly reasonable (though the little white airplane, of course, is not). We make all kinds of lines on our charts in the real world, and I even highlighted them, which made them easier to spot at a glance. This way, instead of "hunt and peck", you have a baseline of where you should be from which to start your search, making the likelihood of finding something familiar happen closer, and sooner.

Contrary to the "keep going" mentality, if you absolutely haven't a clue, it may help to circle while you figure things out. That way, at least, you aren't getting yourself into more trouble while you sort things out. On the other hand, you'll likely disorient yourself further, so this may not be the best course of action.

4. Remember the wind. If you want to go east, but the wind's from the north, you'll have to point the nose east-north-east, in order to counteract the wind and move east.

WTE_Galway
12-22-2011, 03:33 PM
Divide ... multiply ... all the same really.

deskpilot
12-22-2011, 04:01 PM
Great stuff guys, many thanks. I like the point about the waypoints being drawn on the map being probably what real pilots would have done anyway. It must be so satisfying to get lost and then figure it out and get back to base with just vapour in the tanks. I'll take the advice on board.

MB_Avro_UK
12-22-2011, 04:08 PM
It's a lot easier than in real life.

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

jameson2010
12-23-2011, 04:26 AM
"It's a lot easier than in real life." +1

Imagine if we had wind! Stop moaning, lol!

LEBillfish
12-24-2011, 01:08 AM
Use your repeater compass, and look for distinct landmarks (roads, woods, etc.)...Where it gets difficult is far out to sea, pacific maps. Then it's time holding a direction being wary of drift.

K2

wheelsup_cavu
12-25-2011, 09:59 PM
When navigating over the ocean maps I am quite certain if I don't find my carrier I will not miss finding the ocean when I run out of fuel. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif


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