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View Full Version : Looking for inexpensive TrackIR



Snoball7614
03-02-2008, 03:32 PM
Hello fellas. I have been looking for an inexpensive TrackIR (under 100$ and does not have to be tir4) to enhance my simulation experience. I have searched google and came up with nothing except for expensive tir4's. If any of you could point me in the right direction it would be great! Thanks in advance.

julian265
03-02-2008, 03:59 PM
Freetrack.

Free software + suitable webcam + LED and power source = cheap head tracking, even 6 DoF.

Snoball7614
03-02-2008, 04:15 PM
I've actually tried that and seemed to bugger it up everytime... electronics is not for everyone right lol

Snoball7614
03-02-2008, 05:42 PM
I would really appreciate some help guys and gals if you would be so kind!

M_Gunz
03-02-2008, 06:43 PM
What part did you screw up? Troubleshooting can happen.
They sell LED hats at some home stores, also LED safety glasses. You can switch the LEDS or
you can put filter material like dark film negative over regular lights.

For build-your owns or where to find IR LEDS --

These guys have IR LEDs cheap. (http://www.allelectronics.com/cgi-bin/category/340250/Infrared.html)
They have a lot of good stuff.

Note that a single 1.5v battery would need no resistor at all, just get the + and - right. (http://eidusa.com/Electronics_LEDs.htm)
So the long lead to the top of the battery, the short to the bottom -- you can salvage a
battery tray or just use a wide rubber band like the ones they hold broccoli stalks with
at least to test a circuit. They fit snug the long way around AA and AAA, are small and
light and need no soldering. The battery does not put out enough voltage to overcurrent
a 1.6V LED!

Proof enough:

Note:
If you change the battery to 6V battery the resistor value will change as follows:

Using the formula R= (VBatt-VLED)/ILED, the new Resistor value is R=(6V-1.6V)/10mA=440 Ohms. In this instance, a resistor of 560 or 680 Ohms will suffice.

So R = (1.5V - 1.6V)/10mA = -10 Ohms. The LED will not make full brightness but should light.
BTW, red LEDs make huge amounts of IR.

EDIT:
The IR LEDS run 1.3V to 1.7V max at 10mA to 16mA(typical), note the forward voltage vs
forward current chart is only slightly above at 1.5V. IR LEDs are rated to 1.7V but that
is with current limited to 50mA where a battery gives 100+ depending on type -- the formula
tells us that the resistor should be (1.5V - 1.3V)/10mA = 2 Ohms. You get that if you
don't solder, maybe get more that that!

Snoball7614
03-02-2008, 09:44 PM
Thanks a bunch Gunz! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif I will have to reattempt that for myself! I would still like to have a TIR for my little boy though. His mother won't let me make him one (because frankly I wouldn't make a pimple on an electricans a$$... and I don't want to risk shock to my son, he's seven) so I still would like to know if any of y'all know where I could get a good deal on a TIR. Thanks in advance again!

M_Gunz
03-03-2008, 01:31 AM
If I understand some people, a bright reflector on a dark hat lit from behind the camera view
by any house light for example should provide enough contrast for tracking without 6dof which
is IL2 anyway. Maybe try with a glitter sticker if you already have a webcam.

Or look for cheap LED-wear, ball caps with lights built into the brims and different grade
plastic and reading glasses even with built-in LED lights that run a long time on a battery.
Go check, they might have something in a dollar store but more sure at a home or craft store.
You have to put Visible Light filter over the bulbs if you don't/can't switch the bulbs for
IR. I'm a big fan of hot glue for such things, VL filter is like black film negative material.
You don't need big pieces either. I've been told that the material in those glasses you get
after the eye doctor has given you the eye drops is even better, they are cardboard throwaways
anyway but the VL filter quality is darker than dark tint shades.
So with no screwing around with anything electric you can glue dark filters over LEDs, the IR
will shine through and a good bit of the light as well.

Note that cheap cams are almost all CCD's and those are really sensitive to IR. They have IR
filters on front and still can overload -- you can prove this easily with just a webcam, and a
tv or other remote. Point the remote at the webcam and press a button. You get white dot.
Pure white, overloaded elements even through built-in IR filter! I've read that if you pop
the IR filter off a CCD camera it becomes an IR camera. You can view your house from outside
at night and see heat leaks clearly for fixing.

EDIT:
Under $5 light FOR hat at Amazon has 5 LEDs (http://www.amazon.com/StuffJunction-410WW-LED-Cap-Light/dp/B000IBF7UE)

Also through Amazon; $1.24 per unit plus shipping (http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000R0EPHW/ref=dp_olp_2)

Panther Wear for more streamlined look. (http://www.panthervision.com/)

DD_GreyKnight
03-03-2008, 02:09 AM
I use esight from these guy(s)...

http://www.cachya.com

Well worth the $15 and no need for LEDs or batteries.

Maddawg666
03-03-2008, 07:43 PM
Note that cheap cams are almost all CCD's and those are really sensitive to IR. They have IR
filters on front and still can overload -- you can prove this easily with just a webcam, and a
tv or other remote. Point the remote at the webcam and press a button. You get white dot.
Pure white, overloaded elements even through built-in IR filter! I've read that if you pop
the IR filter off a CCD camera it becomes an IR camera. You can view your house from outside
at night and see heat leaks clearly for fixing.
M_Gunz
Spectral response of most CCDs is in the visible and Near IR (.4-1 microns). Cameras for seeing "heat leaks" would need to be operating in 8-12 microns.
Maddawg

M_Gunz
03-03-2008, 08:24 PM
What frequencies do TV remotes transmit?

julian265
03-03-2008, 09:05 PM
You can't get an electric shock from the voltages used here, so don't let that 'risk' stop you!

I use 5V from a USB port, which could kill my computer, but not even cause a tingle to a human.

Battery powered LED's would probably suit you better though.

nikelamp
03-04-2008, 06:06 PM
Originally posted by DD_GreyKnight:
I use esight from these guy(s)...

http://www.cachya.com

Well worth the $15 and no need for LEDs or batteries.

I have been using Cachya for quite a while. Performance is even better than Free-track and setup is easier.

mbfRoy
03-04-2008, 06:45 PM
Originally posted by M_Gunz:
What frequencies do TV remotes transmit?
close to red light, since it's the (cheap) IR led that transmits the stuff

Maddawg666
03-05-2008, 10:09 PM
M_Gunz,
Wavelength of TV remotes is around 0.8 microns. Just above red on the wavelength chart.
Mad

M_Gunz
03-05-2008, 11:22 PM
Oh well, scratch another tale I was told.

I do see you can illuminate at those wavelengths and there are CCD's with different filters
for from UV to the near-IR. Cheap active IR is available but it won't tell me where I'm
leaking heat.

alexa74
03-07-2008, 03:46 AM
Originally posted by nikelamp:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DD_GreyKnight:
I use esight from these guy(s)...

http://www.cachya.com

Well worth the $15 and no need for LEDs or batteries.


I have been using Cachya for quite a while. Performance is even better than Free-track and setup is easier. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
You're my hero man.This is so so clever solution.

TgD Thunderbolt56
03-07-2008, 07:43 AM
The dude just wants to know if anyone has an older version laying around they'd sell him. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/touche.gif

Can anyone answer THAT question?