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View Full Version : Very good info in "Corsair Experience" DVD from vets



Oilburner_TAW
03-22-2005, 05:04 PM
I've only watched the first of 4 dvd's, but here are some things I had to share (a lot of the 1st dvd is interviews with people who flew the Corsair in WW2).

- All of the pilots interviewed said they AT MOST had 1-5 hours of training in the Corsair before beginning combat operations (all of the Corsairs were sent to the war, not to training areas).

- Almost all these vets said that when getting their Corsairs they were all given this basic run through before their 1st flight:

"Here's the throttle, here's the prop control, this is how you start it, this is the gear control. Now go do some touch and go's..."

- The majority of the pilots said they didn't have personal planes, they were assigned a specific plane each day, or just took the plane they were dropped off at before taking off.

- 3 of the vets were talking about doing training in the Brewster Buffalo. They all said it was a dog but they really liked it because it was the first plane they had flown that looked like a fighter. It was standard practice to take a small kit of pliers and a screw driver because the landing gear mechanism routinely jammed and had to be disabled allowing the wheels to free fall into the locked position.

-Speaking of manual gear, another pilot talked about flying F4F's. He said the gear was so heavy that when you lowered it you just took the tension off the release, moved the release (ratchet) to the down position, and then let go of the crank and it would free-wheel (quite quickly) into the lowered position (all the while keeping your hands/etc.. out of the way because it free-wheeled incredibly fast).

Oilburner_TAW
03-22-2005, 05:04 PM
I've only watched the first of 4 dvd's, but here are some things I had to share (a lot of the 1st dvd is interviews with people who flew the Corsair in WW2).

- All of the pilots interviewed said they AT MOST had 1-5 hours of training in the Corsair before beginning combat operations (all of the Corsairs were sent to the war, not to training areas).

- Almost all these vets said that when getting their Corsairs they were all given this basic run through before their 1st flight:

"Here's the throttle, here's the prop control, this is how you start it, this is the gear control. Now go do some touch and go's..."

- The majority of the pilots said they didn't have personal planes, they were assigned a specific plane each day, or just took the plane they were dropped off at before taking off.

- 3 of the vets were talking about doing training in the Brewster Buffalo. They all said it was a dog but they really liked it because it was the first plane they had flown that looked like a fighter. It was standard practice to take a small kit of pliers and a screw driver because the landing gear mechanism routinely jammed and had to be disabled allowing the wheels to free fall into the locked position.

-Speaking of manual gear, another pilot talked about flying F4F's. He said the gear was so heavy that when you lowered it you just took the tension off the release, moved the release (ratchet) to the down position, and then let go of the crank and it would free-wheel (quite quickly) into the lowered position (all the while keeping your hands/etc.. out of the way because it free-wheeled incredibly fast).

VBF-83_Hawk
03-22-2005, 05:47 PM
For the last year of the war most pilots were getting 50 hours or so in them before combat.

VBF-83_Hawk
03-22-2005, 05:47 PM
For the last year of the war most pilots were getting 50 hours or so in them before combat.