PDA

View Full Version : PC monitor Responce Rate



JastaV
08-03-2007, 02:25 PM
I'm looking for a new LCD Widescren PC monitor.

One of the tech aspect to be considered for gaming is Responce Rate.

At present I'm using a 19" LG Flatron L1960TG with an excellent Responce Rate: 2MS.

Most LCD Widescren Monitor superior to 22"" have an inferior Responce Rate: at best 5MS.

Do you think it will be sufficient for best gaming performance?????

Thanks for suggestions

JastaV

Lurch1962
08-03-2007, 04:54 PM
I say the following without knowing what defines a monitor's response time. Is it when a pixel fades to black, or is it when the pixel intensity falls to, say, half its full intensity?

If the response rate is much less than the game's frame rate, I think the point is somewhat moot. An FPS vale of 100 frames/sec is an interval of 10ms, and 50 frames/sec is 20ms. To me, the difference between 2ms and 5ms is possibly splitting hairs.

But I'm prepared to stand corrected! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

--Lurch--

Sun_Ra
08-03-2007, 07:12 PM
Response rate and contrast ratio are some specs to look into. I just bought a 22" widescreen samsung 226BW that has 2ms response, can't remember how it's measeured, maybe grey to grey and 3000:1 contrast ratio plus dvi hdcp compliance. Check it out. 2ms is about as fast as it gets now.
LCD's run around 60 Hz refresh rate, so in my case, the way I have things set the Frames Per Second maxes out 60 fps but it's smooth and doesn't seem to drop to far.

-HH- Beebop
08-03-2007, 08:13 PM
Response times are like power output. You need to know how it was measured.
Power supplies may be rated at say 1000W but what you really want to know is the RMS (root/mean/square) or continous output. If that 1000W supply is "Peak" output that only means it can put out that much power for a very short time. If it's 1000W RMS that means it puts out 1000W continuously.
Now to monitor response time. Many manufacturers use grey>grey>grey to measure, that is, a light shade of grey to a darker shade of grey back to a lighter shade of grey. That can happen very quickly so a 2ms response time would be realistic. But you want to know how fast the pixel can change color. You need to know the white>black>white (full on/full off/full on) time. Right now IIRC, the best for white>black>white is around 5-8ms. If the pixels can change that fast you won't see any blurring of the image. Blurring is most noticeable in flight and racing sims where the background goes by quickly and the foreground remains relatively static. FPS and other games it's not so noticeable as often the background is in the distance so only the immediate foreground changes which means fewer pixels need to change.
So, you should ask the salesperson (who probably won't know) or go to the manufacturers website and find out what method they used to measure the monitors response time.

My 2 kopecks worth.

JastaV
08-04-2007, 03:00 AM
Originally posted by -HH- Beebop:
Response times are like power output. You need to know how it was measured.
Power supplies may be rated at say 1000W but what you really want to know is the RMS (root/mean/square) or continous output. If that 1000W supply is "Peak" output that only means it can put out that much power for a very short time. If it's 1000W RMS that means it puts out 1000W continuously.
Now to monitor response time. Many manufacturers use grey>grey>grey to measure, that is, a light shade of grey to a darker shade of grey back to a lighter shade of grey. That can happen very quickly so a 2ms response time would be realistic. But you want to know how fast the pixel can change color. You need to know the white>black>white (full on/full off/full on) time. Right now IIRC, the best for white>black>white is around 5-8ms. If the pixels can change that fast you won't see any blurring of the image. Blurring is most noticeable in flight and racing sims where the background goes by quickly and the foreground remains relatively static. FPS and other games it's not so noticeable as often the background is in the distance so only the immediate foreground changes which means fewer pixels need to change.
So, you should ask the salesperson (who probably won't know) or go to the manufacturers website and find out what method they used to measure the monitors response time.

My 2 kopecks worth.

Thanks for this realy competent explanation.

JAstaV

JastaV
08-04-2007, 03:07 AM
Originally posted by -HH- Beebop:
Response times are like power output. You need to know how it was measured.
Power supplies may be rated at say 1000W but what you really want to know is the RMS (root/mean/square) or continous output. If that 1000W supply is "Peak" output that only means it can put out that much power for a very short time. If it's 1000W RMS that means it puts out 1000W continuously.
Now to monitor response time. Many manufacturers use grey>grey>grey to measure, that is, a light shade of grey to a darker shade of grey back to a lighter shade of grey. That can happen very quickly so a 2ms response time would be realistic. But you want to know how fast the pixel can change color. You need to know the white>black>white (full on/full off/full on) time. Right now IIRC, the best for white>black>white is around 5-8ms. If the pixels can change that fast you won't see any blurring of the image. Blurring is most noticeable in flight and racing sims where the background goes by quickly and the foreground remains relatively static. FPS and other games it's not so noticeable as often the background is in the distance so only the immediate foreground changes which means fewer pixels need to change.
So, you should ask the salesperson (who probably won't know) or go to the manufacturers website and find out what method they used to measure the monitors response time.

My 2 kopecks worth.

Samsung site reports Response Time as BTW, that to say "Black to White", I guess.
Is that a third methor to describe test responce time or is to be regarded as the "Black to White to Black" method you reported?????

JastaV