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View Full Version : Life and Career of Colonel John R. Boyd.



woofiedog
05-12-2007, 10:42 PM
Quote... Colonel John Boyd should be considered one of the most important military theorists of the United States. Though his ideas permeate through disparate disciplines such as business and the military art, only a few now know his name.

Story Link: http://www.d-n-i.net/fcs/boyd_thesis.htm

http://www.sci.fi/~fta/Boyd-1s.jpg

<span class="ev_code_YELLOW">40 Second Boyd

The 40-second Boyd name epitomized his capabilities in air-to-air combat. While stationed at Nellis Air Force Base in Las Vegas, Boyd had a standing bet that he could maneuver from a position of disadvantage (the adversary to his rear or 'six' in a firing position) to a position of advantage (Boyd on the opponent's tail in a position to fire) in less than 40 seconds. If the adversary could hold Boyd off for more than 40 seconds, the instructor would pay them 40 dollars. This was no easy task on Boyd's part, as Nellis was and is the home of the fighter pilot and the Fighter Weapons School, the Air Force's School of advanced fighter combat training. A friend of Boyd's recalls an anecdote that furthered his legendary status.

Sprad Spradling recalls one incident in particular from among the numerous challenges that Boyd would get to his forty-second or forty dollar bet. A certain Marine Corps Captain, Hal Vincent, came up from China Lake on a clear channel while flying a mission near Nellis and challenged Boyd to an aerial duel. Boyd was up and answered.

Vincent said, "I hear you've got some standing bet about being able to slam someone on your six in forty seconds or less."

Boyd said that was true.

"Well I don't have time or fuel on today's mission but let's make a date and see how good you are." They did. Vincent in his F-8U Crusader met Boyd in an F-100 at the appointed time and place. Boyd allowed Vincent to get on his tail and try to stick with him. It was over in less than ten seconds. Boyd was on Vincent's tail. They repeated the game three times with the same results each time.
</span>

Also... : http://www.ascho.wpafb.af.mil/korea/chap5.htm

BillyTheKid_22
05-12-2007, 11:21 PM
http://www.arlingtoncemetery.net/jrboyd-gravesite-photo-august-2006.jpg



http://www.aviation-history.com/north-american/rb_so.jpg

Badsight-
05-12-2007, 11:41 PM
so either Hal Vincent completely sucked at ACM , or the F-8U Crusader was a total dog compared to the F100

10 seconds he's on your six after you started on his - that pilot should have been dismissed -P

Badsight-
05-12-2007, 11:46 PM
but in all seriousness , Boyds work in energy tactics was impressive , from his early graphs comparing the Saber to the Mig - the guy saw things as they really were in the air

woofiedog
05-13-2007, 12:37 AM
Seems that Hal Vincent USMC also wrote an article called Moonlighting for the Marine Corps
Gazette.
Quote... This article examines some of the techniques that are used in night CAS.

Link story of USMC (Ret.), MGEN Hal Vincent: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3834/is_200404/ai_n9356320

woofiedog
05-13-2007, 01:02 AM
Quote... so either Hal Vincent completely sucked at ACM , or the F-8U Crusader was a total dog compared to the F100

I would have to believe that Boyd was one of those Very Exceptional flier's.
The war record of the F-8 Crusader is a story of it's own. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

BillyTheKid_22
05-13-2007, 01:22 AM
Originally posted by woofiedog:
Quote... so either Hal Vincent completely sucked at ACM , or the F-8U Crusader was a total dog compared to the F100

I would have to believe that Boyd was one of those Very Exceptional flier's.
The war record of the F-8 Crusader is a story of it's own. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif



http://www.aviation-art.net/bonnie%20dick%20f8%20launch.jpg



http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif F-8 Crusader!!



http://www.letrappeur.com/chien_444.gif

Blutarski2004
05-13-2007, 07:12 AM
Boyd's "40-second challenge" technique was described in Coram's biography of him. Perhaps the most remarkable aspect of his long string of successes was that he achieved it flying an F100, which was not exactly the most agile of a/c.

How he did it is interesting. There was actually a reason why Boyd put the challenger start on his tail.

Boyd was always an experimenter and liked to push his a/c into maneuvers and attitudes officially discouraged by the flight manuals, just to see what would happen. He discovered that the F-100 retained extremely good stall and handling characteristics at unusually high angles of attack and employed this unusual feature of the F100 in his dogfight challenges. By suddenly and radically pitching up, Boyd would scrub off huge amounts of speed, cause an overshoot, and then put the nose down and hit after-burner. I believed he called it his "barn-door maneuver". No other US fighter a/c of the period could emulate the maneuver. And no other US fighter pilot of that time ever mastered it.

XyZspineZyX
05-13-2007, 07:36 AM
Boyd's biography si a fascinating book, highly recommended.

I recall that he also started his turns in the Hun with the rudder, a technique regarded as completely wrong by the USAF