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View Full Version : Excerpt from audio interview of VMF-113 Corsair pilot



flakwagen
08-23-2005, 07:49 AM
I conducted a voice interview with my grandfather during my summer vacation. After listening to it I have to say that I am a lousy interviewer. I wound up with a few interesting segments anyway. This clip is about his one and only encounter with Japanese fighters.

It is 1.9 megabytes:

http://home.ec.rr.com/galland/fbskins/ponape_dogfight_1944.mp3
http://home.ec.rr.com/galland/fbskins/gfather02.jpg

Low_Flyer_MkII
08-23-2005, 10:49 AM
Like many vets, he seems modest about his acheivements - interesting stuff about the B-25's guns slowing them down.

Thanks for sharing.

vocatx
08-23-2005, 07:58 PM
Interesting story. There are a lot of these stories that are being lost every day. I wish they could all be saved for posterity. I wouldn't mind hearing more if you want to post them.

About the guns on the B-25s: I think the one he is talking about is the 75mm gun. I read a book one time where a pilot talked about firing it in the air. He said it felt as if the airplane stopped every time it was fired.

VFS-214_Hawk
08-23-2005, 08:07 PM
What did he shoot down....A6Ms?

I also am very interested in hearing more.

email me?

flakwagen
08-24-2005, 08:37 AM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:
Like many vets, he seems modest about his acheivements - interesting stuff about the B-25's guns slowing them down.

Thanks for sharing.

Yes, I think the flight consisted of B-25C and B-25G aircraft. I think the discussion linked here is about this particular incident but I'm not 100% sure. I haven't shown this to him yet:

http://www.j-aircraft.com/faq/A6M_pt5.htm

Search the page for VMF-113 and you should run into a post about a dogfight over Pontame that seems to match up very well with his account.

I will try to whip up more clips as time permits. A lot of the interview consists of personal family history and other non-military things. People tend to drift from topic to topic without regard for chronological order. I've interviewed two relatives like this and can say from experience that getting people to recite their memories in a calender-like fashion is like trying to herd cats. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif

Flak

Low_Flyer_MkII
08-24-2005, 03:37 PM
It's great when you can verify your interviews with other sources, isn't it? To put your family at the centre of historical events. And I know what you mean about herding cats!

A few years ago I was employed interviewing veterans and spent lots of time very respectfully sitting through long sessions of granchildren's photographs before steering them back to their wartime memories. As others have noted here, these people won't be around forever, and it's important that we preserve what they went through. One of the by-products of my interviewing was that I ended up giving talks in schools & colleges, illustrated by photos & memorabillia. I was interupted on more than one occaision by a cry of "but that's my Grand-dad! (or Grandmother)" by an amazed student who had no idea of what their relatives had been through. Back to their modesty again!

Keep it up, it's important to keep their flame alive.

polak5
08-24-2005, 03:45 PM
Kol deal man, ive been meaning to do the same with my grandfather and his experiences in the pacific.
oh and hey.Can u post the questions u asked him.I can hear him talking just fine but i cant make out the questions you are asking him.

regards,polak

SeaFireLIV
08-24-2005, 04:04 PM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkII:

I was interupted on more than one occaision by a cry of "but that's my Grand-dad! (or Grandmother)" by an amazed student who had no idea of what their relatives had been through. Back to their modesty again!

Keep it up, it's important to keep their flame alive.

AMEN to that, Brother.