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csthopper
08-24-2007, 07:12 PM
Interesting place which has the transcripts of cockpit conversation prior to an airline crash. Not all are fatal, and you can see how cool & calm some of these pilots are in dire situations.

Sorry if this has been posted before, New here, but did a search for the link before a post ;-)

http://www.planecrashinfo.com/lastwords.htm

csthopper
08-24-2007, 07:12 PM
Interesting place which has the transcripts of cockpit conversation prior to an airline crash. Not all are fatal, and you can see how cool & calm some of these pilots are in dire situations.

Sorry if this has been posted before, New here, but did a search for the link before a post ;-)

http://www.planecrashinfo.com/lastwords.htm

DKoor
08-24-2007, 07:20 PM
Very bad things......

csthopper
08-24-2007, 07:42 PM
Ya all the times i've restarted after crashing in IL2, this puts that into perspective http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

RAF74_Raptor
08-26-2007, 03:27 AM
Some of those are Just terrible

huggy87
08-26-2007, 10:10 AM
I got my 737 type rating recently and during the class we watched a video of the 737 crash in colorado. It was due to a rudder hard over at low altitude; there was no way the pilots could have figured out how to correct. It was sickening to watch as you knew the crew could do nothing but ride it in with all the pax behind them. Very sobering.

JG52Uther
08-26-2007, 10:34 AM
Amazing how professional they seem,trying to sort the problem all the way down.

JZG_Yunus
08-26-2007, 10:37 AM
those pilots could not have done anything,
and it wasn't the 1st 737 that experienced that hard rudder over.

faulty servo's that act wack when they are at sub-zero temperatures. ( high Alt ,and cold area's like colorado )

the problem is fixed now though, new servo's aren't affeted by temperature

rnzoli
08-27-2007, 06:09 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JG52Uther:
Amazing how professional they seem,trying to sort the problem all the way down. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Not all of them, I am afraid. There are situations when an unprofessional crew screws up big time, and it really shows on the CVRs.

But overall, it is indeed amazing, what a good crew is trying to accomplish to save the aircraft or reduce the impact. Unfortunately this isn't reflected in the 'last words' entirely.

For example, Alaskan Airlines captain tried to reduce descent rate by flying that big plane INVERTED. And he did take care trying to reduce impact, only seconds before hitting the water:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">
16:20:54 CAPT: Speedbrakes.
16:20:55 F/O: Got it.
16:20:56 F/O: Ah here we go.
</div></BLOCKQUOTE>

rnzoli
08-27-2007, 06:15 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by huggy87:
I got my 737 type rating recently and during the class we watched a video of the 737 crash in colorado. It was due to a rudder hard over at low altitude; there was no way the pilots could have figured out how to correct. It was sickening to watch as you knew the crew could do nothing but ride it in with all the pax behind them. Very sobering. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
I saw an NTSB animation from this incident, both from outside view, and also inside. The inside view was truly sickening, because you could imagine the forces and screaming before impact, it was more "first person" than the external view.

And the most saddening is that these incidents affected quite good crews - but even good crew cannot escape their destiny.

BTW, why did you watch the video? When following up that investigation, I heard that the new servos will be retrofited on the 737s throughout several years, so maybe there are old rudder servos still in operation on some 737s even today. However, 737 training was supposed to be improved to allow pilot detect and properly act in case rudder hardover/reversal occurs. Was that the reason, why you had to watch the video about this incident?

huggy87
08-27-2007, 08:26 AM
We probably saw the same video. The one I saw was an American Airlines production; this incident was one of many and it did not go into great detail on 737 specifics. From what I recall the problem has been fixed on 737s.

The bigger take away from the video was that we pilots are trusting too much to automation, and we need to train more to these what if scenarios. With the rudder hard over, they made the point that a crew with more altitude can stuff the stick and may fly away, albeit barely controllable. Having said that, I never practiced this in my training.