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Pirschjaeger
11-25-2005, 01:07 AM
World War II Story by Robert F. Gallagher
"Scratch One Messerschmitt"

Synopsis and About the Author

This story takes you into the daily lives of an average GI during World War II. It begins shortly before America's entrance into the war when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The author tells about his life on the South side of Chicago living in the shadow of the steel mills. He and his friends are enjoying their senior year in high school as the hard times of the Great Depression are coming to a close.

America's entrance in the war changes everything.

After the disappointment of being rejected while trying to volunteer for the Air Force, the author is finally drafted into service. The story takes you through the induction center, the trip cross-country by train and finally his assignment to an antiaircraft battalion in a Southern California camp. Assigned to a 40mm gun crew, he is exposed to some high-ranking noncommissioned officers for training. He describes them as "having the moral fiber of snakes." An eccentric captain adds much to the color throughout the story. The rigorous training includes several extended stays in the inhospitable Mojave Desert for gunnery practice.

Following training, he is shipped across the country to an embarkation camp near New York City. Crammed aboard a converted luxury liner headed for Europe, the ship encounters a major storm on the Atlantic Ocean that lasts for three days. Landing in Scotland, he is shipped to a camp in Southwest England that leaves a lot to be desired. His outfit loads aboard an LST (Landing Ship Tank) crossing the English Channel and landing on the beach in Le Havre France. From there they join General Patton's Third Army that is battling the Germans who are being pushed back through Northern France, Luxembourg and finally Germany. When the war in Europe is over he is shipped to Antwerp, Belgium where his battalion is made into an MP unit with its share of excitement. His concern for the possibility of being shipped to the Pacific Theatre is nullified when America drops the atomic bombs forcing the Japanese to surrender and the war ends.

The story describes the highs and lows the author experiences while coping with Army regimentation. He tells about his feelings toward the officers and noncoms that direct every move that he makes. It is a story about the human qualities of a GI at the bottom of the chain of command, along with his buddies, who are civilians at heart, and their struggle with the inefficiencies, inequities, frustrations, and downright miserable living conditions that military life can generate during wartime. The personalities and quirks of each of the author's fellow crewmembers with whom he lived are described in detail. Their actions and reactions to army life becomes more interesting to the reader because most of the crew can be identified through more than 180 photographs in the book, most of them taken by the author at key sites. Suspense, humor, compassion, excitement, and disappointment are all woven into the story.

The final chapter deals with life immediately following the war with the problems of adjusting back into civilian life. It tells about how some of the author's buddies did not fare too well and returned from combat with permanent disabilities.

<span class="ev_code_GREEN">You can find the complete story at this site:</span>

http://www.gallagher.com/ww2/index.html

I like the details. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

Pirschjaeger
11-25-2005, 01:07 AM
World War II Story by Robert F. Gallagher
"Scratch One Messerschmitt"

Synopsis and About the Author

This story takes you into the daily lives of an average GI during World War II. It begins shortly before America's entrance into the war when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The author tells about his life on the South side of Chicago living in the shadow of the steel mills. He and his friends are enjoying their senior year in high school as the hard times of the Great Depression are coming to a close.

America's entrance in the war changes everything.

After the disappointment of being rejected while trying to volunteer for the Air Force, the author is finally drafted into service. The story takes you through the induction center, the trip cross-country by train and finally his assignment to an antiaircraft battalion in a Southern California camp. Assigned to a 40mm gun crew, he is exposed to some high-ranking noncommissioned officers for training. He describes them as "having the moral fiber of snakes." An eccentric captain adds much to the color throughout the story. The rigorous training includes several extended stays in the inhospitable Mojave Desert for gunnery practice.

Following training, he is shipped across the country to an embarkation camp near New York City. Crammed aboard a converted luxury liner headed for Europe, the ship encounters a major storm on the Atlantic Ocean that lasts for three days. Landing in Scotland, he is shipped to a camp in Southwest England that leaves a lot to be desired. His outfit loads aboard an LST (Landing Ship Tank) crossing the English Channel and landing on the beach in Le Havre France. From there they join General Patton's Third Army that is battling the Germans who are being pushed back through Northern France, Luxembourg and finally Germany. When the war in Europe is over he is shipped to Antwerp, Belgium where his battalion is made into an MP unit with its share of excitement. His concern for the possibility of being shipped to the Pacific Theatre is nullified when America drops the atomic bombs forcing the Japanese to surrender and the war ends.

The story describes the highs and lows the author experiences while coping with Army regimentation. He tells about his feelings toward the officers and noncoms that direct every move that he makes. It is a story about the human qualities of a GI at the bottom of the chain of command, along with his buddies, who are civilians at heart, and their struggle with the inefficiencies, inequities, frustrations, and downright miserable living conditions that military life can generate during wartime. The personalities and quirks of each of the author's fellow crewmembers with whom he lived are described in detail. Their actions and reactions to army life becomes more interesting to the reader because most of the crew can be identified through more than 180 photographs in the book, most of them taken by the author at key sites. Suspense, humor, compassion, excitement, and disappointment are all woven into the story.

The final chapter deals with life immediately following the war with the problems of adjusting back into civilian life. It tells about how some of the author's buddies did not fare too well and returned from combat with permanent disabilities.

<span class="ev_code_GREEN">You can find the complete story at this site:</span>

http://www.gallagher.com/ww2/index.html

I like the details. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Fritz

Low_Flyer_MkII
11-25-2005, 04:58 AM
Just given the site a qiuck scan - a virtual book! I'm looking forwards very much to devouring this at my leisure. Great find. Thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

redfeathers1948
11-25-2005, 11:44 AM
Wow yea now that is an early Christmas gift for me. Thanks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

danjama
11-25-2005, 01:53 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/351.gif Thanks Fritz