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View Full Version : Rand Miller video interview (a few spoilers)



darkcity2005
04-22-2005, 10:25 PM
anyone see this?

http://www.gamespot.com/pc/adventure/mystvendo***es/media.html

darkcity2005
04-22-2005, 10:25 PM
anyone see this?

http://www.gamespot.com/pc/adventure/mystvendo***es/media.html

thewebb
04-23-2005, 10:05 AM
cool. it does kinda disapoint me in a couple of ways though. firstly because he implied the puzzles would be easier and second because he said you would interact with yeesha and some now guy but no word of ghen - and i always wanted to see his return since i finished riven. i thought he would be when i heard it would bring together past stortlines.

mszv
04-23-2005, 10:18 AM
Hi,
I enjoyed both the preview on gamespot, and the interview with Rand Miller.

The preview is in this link. It's a good write-up.
http://www.gamespot.com/pc/adventure/mystvendo***es/preview_6122764.html

I think they are tapping into the essence of the appeal of the Myst series games, for many people, including me. I don't play the Myst series games for the puzzles, never have.

Mowog
05-06-2005, 08:24 AM
I understand Rand's comments, and I appreciate them. There was a certain elegance in the earlier titles that I think was lost to an extent as the technology improved, bringing with it lusher and more extravagant environments and effects, at the expense of a purer gaming experience. I eventually quit Myst IV, and I seriously doubt I'll ever attempt to finish it. I realize that the game isn't flawed as such, since a lot of you have completed it just fine. But I simply hit the wall; and any attempts at making progress were thwarted by really dense puzzle design, the clumsy interface, complex environments like the Haven jungle that are difficult to navigate using nodes, the water puzzle that seemed solved in certain views but not in others... and so on. I felt a frustration with Myst IV that I'd never felt with any of the previous adventures.

I'd love to see Myst V return to the same simple, elegant genius that characterized the earlier titles, without getting so wrapped up in the bells and whistles. You can only do so much with a mouse and keyboard, so let's not stretch the limits too far and damage the experience. Concentrate on solutions requiring logic and intuition, and make the eventual solution one that's not dependent on the player's mastering the mechanical interface.

Thietris
05-06-2005, 12:42 PM
I concur with your comments 100%, Mowog.

Wolf52371
05-12-2005, 03:13 PM
I'm and explorer myself and i really like the return to less mind numbing puzzles.

monsieurdavid
05-12-2005, 08:39 PM
When you get to the point where you say, f(orget) it, I'm just going to open the walkthrough so I can get this over with (guilty as charged), it doesn't speak well of the game (Revelation). Enough said.

As I understand Rand's remarks in this video interview, the outcome of the new game will depend on which of the two characters you encounter you listen to. (Sound familiar?) I thought this was what was supposed to happen with Revelation, but I'm not talking about just ending up in a trap book, or getting zapped so you have to go through the "inconvenience" of starting over. Rather, I'm talking about a completely different ending, with maybe a different last third of the game, a separate narrative to lead you to a seriously different conclusion -- essentially two games in one. Too much to ask for?

Syked4
05-13-2005, 11:22 PM
monsieurdavid
This would be great. Simply saving at the end when an obvious is choice presented dosen't quit cut it does it. Being drawn into the choice, without realy knowing when it happend is so much more real. Lets hope.

Mowog
05-17-2005, 08:56 AM
Alternative story lines can be huge fun. When our son was younger, he and I really enjoyed the "Spy Fox" games from Humongous Entertainment. These games each featured two or three different story tracks that weren't choice-driven so much as random; and the fun part was that I didn't notice that at first, so that the first time we re-played an adventure, we were surprised when the plot took off in a different direction. I appreciated that they had designed in some replayability, something that's good to have in kids' software. Rather than just "beating" the game and forgetting it, our son returned to each Spy Fox game a few times.

Sheesh, now he's stuck on Halo 2. Think I'll go home and play Spy Fox. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif