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LeadSpitter_
09-22-2005, 03:53 PM
http://biomicro.sdstate.edu/pederses/asmbat.html

Undoubtedly the most sophisticated winged missile ever used in warfare prior to 1967, this self-homing anti-ship missile and the first to have an Army/Navy missile designation. Its genesis lay in Dragon, begun in January 1941 by RCA who used their TV expertise to devise a TV-guided aerial torpedo for use against surface ships, with airframe by NBS (National Bureau of Standards). By late 1942, when the airframe had flown, the U-boat menace caused a change in direction. Dragon became Pelican and the payload a depth charge steered by semi-active radar homing, the radar being in the launch aircraft. By mid 1943 the U-boats had been defeated, and Pelican was again reorientated as an anti-ship misssile, enlarged to carry a 2,000 lb (907 kg) general purpose bomb and RHB radar homing.

In 1944 the fourth and final fresh start resulted in Bat like a bat it sent out pulses and listened to the reflections. Using the sarne NBS airframe Bat carried a Western Electric pulsed radar in the nose and homed on the reflections from the target ship. Like Gorgon it had four small windmill-driven generators, and the autopilot servos drove the tailplane ( with fixed fins ) arid wing elevons. In the centre was a 1,000 lb (454 kg) GP bomb. Bat was developed at the Navy Bureau of Ordnance in close collaboration with MIT whose Hugh L. Dryden won the Presidential Certificate of Merit for it. The PB4Y-2 Privateer carried two Bats on outer-wing racks, and from May 1945 off Borneo took in increasing toll of Japanese ships, including a destroyer sunk at the extreme range of 20 miles (32 kin) - range being a function of release altitude. With modified radar several Bats successfully homed on bridges in Burma and other Japanese-held areas.


Length: 11 ft, 11 in (3.63 m)
Span: 10 ft, 0 in (3.05 m)
Launch Weight: 1,880 lb (852.7 kg)
Warhead: 1,000 lb (454 kg) HE
Range: Depends on launch altitude with 20 miles (32 km) being maximum
Flying Speed: 300 mph (483 km/h)
Guidance: self homing using on board radar
Radar: Western Electric pulsed radar

LeadSpitter_
09-22-2005, 03:53 PM
http://biomicro.sdstate.edu/pederses/asmbat.html

Undoubtedly the most sophisticated winged missile ever used in warfare prior to 1967, this self-homing anti-ship missile and the first to have an Army/Navy missile designation. Its genesis lay in Dragon, begun in January 1941 by RCA who used their TV expertise to devise a TV-guided aerial torpedo for use against surface ships, with airframe by NBS (National Bureau of Standards). By late 1942, when the airframe had flown, the U-boat menace caused a change in direction. Dragon became Pelican and the payload a depth charge steered by semi-active radar homing, the radar being in the launch aircraft. By mid 1943 the U-boats had been defeated, and Pelican was again reorientated as an anti-ship misssile, enlarged to carry a 2,000 lb (907 kg) general purpose bomb and RHB radar homing.

In 1944 the fourth and final fresh start resulted in Bat like a bat it sent out pulses and listened to the reflections. Using the sarne NBS airframe Bat carried a Western Electric pulsed radar in the nose and homed on the reflections from the target ship. Like Gorgon it had four small windmill-driven generators, and the autopilot servos drove the tailplane ( with fixed fins ) arid wing elevons. In the centre was a 1,000 lb (454 kg) GP bomb. Bat was developed at the Navy Bureau of Ordnance in close collaboration with MIT whose Hugh L. Dryden won the Presidential Certificate of Merit for it. The PB4Y-2 Privateer carried two Bats on outer-wing racks, and from May 1945 off Borneo took in increasing toll of Japanese ships, including a destroyer sunk at the extreme range of 20 miles (32 kin) - range being a function of release altitude. With modified radar several Bats successfully homed on bridges in Burma and other Japanese-held areas.


Length: 11 ft, 11 in (3.63 m)
Span: 10 ft, 0 in (3.05 m)
Launch Weight: 1,880 lb (852.7 kg)
Warhead: 1,000 lb (454 kg) HE
Range: Depends on launch altitude with 20 miles (32 km) being maximum
Flying Speed: 300 mph (483 km/h)
Guidance: self homing using on board radar
Radar: Western Electric pulsed radar

jarink
09-22-2005, 05:41 PM
Pic of the Bat:
http://www.air-and-space.com/20020625%20China%20Lake/DCP00476%20Bat%20Missile%20l.jpg

However, I like the other "bat bomb" project better.

From Defense Tech:
"The idea behind World War II's Project X-Ray was that a bomb-like canister filled with bats would be dropped from high altitude over the target area," says Murdoc Online. "The bats would be in a sort of hibernation, but as the bomb fell (slowed by a parachute) they would warm up and awaken."

At the appropriate altitude, the bomb would open and over one thousand bats, each carrying a tiny time-delay napalm incendiary device, would flutter away and roost in various nooks and crannies, many of them in extremely flammable wooden Japanese buildings.

The napalm devices would go off more or less simultaneously, and thousands of little fires would start at the same time. Many of them would grow into large fires, and the ability of the Japanese firefighters to contain them would quickly be overwhelmed..."


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

ElAurens
09-22-2005, 05:45 PM
Thanks Lead.

Very interesting stuff.

Kocur_
09-22-2005, 06:18 PM
Bat was tremedous achievement, way ahead of its time!

If by "used in warfare prior to 1967" you mean combat use, you are right (sinking of Israeli destroyer Eliath). If you mean service in general, that would be like 1952 when soviet KS-1 missile went into production.

Platypus_1.JaVA
09-23-2005, 10:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by jarink:

However, I like the other "bat bomb" project better.

From Defense Tech:
"The idea behind World War II's Project X-Ray was that a bomb-like canister filled with bats would be dropped from high altitude over the target area," says Murdoc Online. "The bats would be in a sort of hibernation, but as the bomb fell (slowed by a parachute) they would warm up and awaken."

At the appropriate altitude, the bomb would open and over one thousand bats, each carrying a tiny time-delay napalm incendiary device, would flutter away and roost in various nooks and crannies, many of them in extremely flammable wooden Japanese buildings.

The napalm devices would go off more or less simultaneously, and thousands of little fires would start at the same time. Many of them would grow into large fires, and the ability of the Japanese firefighters to contain them would quickly be overwhelmed..."


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Indeed a much cooler project but, they quit epirimenting when the bats burned down a hangar.