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Abbuzze
06-27-2005, 04:00 AM
Hello gentlemen,

I do a translation from german into english, and all which allready read some of my posts know what this mean! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Ok, now my 1st problem, I have a good online dictionary, that also includes some aviation terms, but sometimes it fails.
I think this is just the first term I will have to ask here, I would be very glad to get some help!

1st Problem:

german- "Abschwung": this is the following move, you starting to roll, and after at least 90 degree you go into a dive - How do you call this in english?

2nd Problem:

german- "Hornausgleich": If you take a look at the vertical tail of the 109(early) you can see a small part of the rudder is moving to the opposite side cause it is in front of the moving axis, how do call this thing?

THANKS!!!

bird_brain
06-27-2005, 05:39 AM
Your 1st maneuver..."Abschwung"...would be "to peel off" if you rolled less than 180 degrees before diving. A 180 degree roll & dive is a "Split S"

Abbuzze
06-27-2005, 05:44 AM
Originally posted by bird_brain:
Your 1st maneuver..."Abschwung"...would be "to peel off" if you rolled less than 180 degrees before diving. A 180 degree roll & dive is a "Split S"

Ah, thanks! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
The dictionary told me swingdown, but I think this is related to economy, or other effects!

Tully__
06-27-2005, 06:02 AM
Originally posted by Abbuzze:
german- "Hornausgleich": If you take a look at the vertical tail of the 109(early) you can see a small part of the rudder is moving to the opposite side cause it is in front of the moving axis, how do call this thing?

THANKS!!!

Closest term I know of would be "Leading edge", meaning the front edge of any aerodynamic surface.

AFSG_Bulldog
06-27-2005, 06:17 AM
Well I believe I would define your first discription as a maneuver now called a "wing over". Pilots during WWII did call it "pealing off".

Your second discription sounds like a "counter balance". It is used to lighten or counter the aerodynamic loads that tend to hold a flying surface in line with the relative wind.

Von_Zero
06-27-2005, 06:29 AM
german- "Hornausgleich": If you take a look at the vertical tail of the 109(early) you can see a small part of the rudder is moving to the opposite side cause it is in front of the moving axis, how do call this thing?
'i think it is called something like "compensator", cuz it uses the forward part to compensate for the airflow pushing the other half. Thus the effort needed for moving the rudder, let's say would be something like: effort needed for moving a surface equal with the rear part minus the effort needed to move a surface equal with the forward part. Sorry for the confussion, i can't explain it better. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

bird_brain
06-27-2005, 06:37 AM
Originally posted by AFSG_Bulldog:
Wll I believe I would define your first discription as a maneuver now called a "wing over".

Google says...

Wingover
The Wing-Over is a competition maneuver in aerobatics. You pull up and at the same time bank the plane. When the bank increases past 45 degrees, the nose will start to drop while the bank keeps increasing and the plane keeps turning. Halfway through the maneuver, the plane has turned 90 degrees, the fuselage is level with the horizon and the bank is 90 degrees. The plane is above the original flight path. The nose then keeps dropping below the horizon and the plane keeps turning, while the bank is shallowed. When the bank drops below 45 degrees, the nose is pulled up towards the horizon and the plane reaches horizontal flight with wings level after 180 degrees of turn. At the completion of the maneuver, the plane is at the same altitude as on entry and flying in the opposite direction.


Wingover; left or right 180? tight turn (yaw) at the top of a 1/4 looping (up)

Abbuzze
06-27-2005, 07:07 AM
Originally posted by bird_brain:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by AFSG_Bulldog:
Wll I believe I would define your first discription as a maneuver now called a "wing over".

Google says...

Wingover
The Wing-Over is a competition maneuver in aerobatics. You pull up and at the same time bank the plane. When the bank increases past 45 degrees, the nose will start to drop while the bank keeps increasing and the plane keeps turning. Halfway through the maneuver, the plane has turned 90 degrees, the fuselage is level with the horizon and the bank is 90 degrees. The plane is above the original flight path. The nose then keeps dropping below the horizon and the plane keeps turning, while the bank is shallowed. When the bank drops below 45 degrees, the nose is pulled up towards the horizon and the plane reaches horizontal flight with wings level after 180 degrees of turn. At the completion of the maneuver, the plane is at the same altitude as on entry and flying in the opposite direction.


Wingover; left or right 180? tight turn (yaw) at the top of a 1/4 looping (up) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The move I mean was the one a Stuke flys when it go into a dive, often to see in movies.

For the part at the tail, I think (also found) counterbalance seems to be correct.

Next bigger part http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
I will also need someone as a corrector, who is english teacher or native english speaker.
The best would be with german as a foreign language... but even another foreign language would make the job easier for him/her, cause it´s easier to understand what is meant if a bigger failure appears.
Hmm it would also help if he like the 109 cause it would make the job less boring! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Heliopause
06-27-2005, 07:39 AM
Ja = yes
Nein = no

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

diomedes33
06-27-2005, 11:06 AM
Originally posted by Abbuzze:
2nd Problem:

german- "Hornausgleich": If you take a look at the vertical tail of the 109(early) you can see a small part of the rudder is moving to the opposite side cause it is in front of the moving axis, how do call this thing?


I think you're talking about a horn mass balance. It helps to stop the control surfaces from fluttering.

This site (http://www.pilotfriend.com/flight_training/aerodynamics/primary_controls.htm) has some pictures and descriptions, scroll about halfway down.