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Choctaw111
10-30-2008, 11:23 AM
You will greatly enjoy this film sent to me by a very good Navy friend...

http://www.greatdanepromilitary.com/SR-71/index.htm

P.FunkAdelic
10-30-2008, 11:37 AM
That is one awesome aircraft. Love that bit about the air traffic controller.

Stingray333
10-30-2008, 11:51 AM
awesome, thanks for the link. Wow, I cannot comprehend how fast flying at 2000+ mph must be like

Schwarz.13
10-30-2008, 06:52 PM
Thanks for the (ever-so-slightly quaint) link about a pretty MENTAL aircraft!

But I think we should let Jeremy have the last word on his teenage fantasy (skip to 14:32):

Jeremy Clarkson SR-71 (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-6689729805171588113&q=source:016895515009933979068&hl=en)

M_Gunz
10-30-2008, 08:16 PM
It's shame that they were retired. You don't have to fly them all the time if you want to cut costs.
What do we actually have that can do the same job let alone for less?

Kettenhunde
10-31-2008, 12:24 AM
You don't have to fly them all the time if you want to cut costs.


Hi M_Gunz,

That is not really true. Most people who have not owned an airplane do not realize this fact. Airplanes have fixed expenses you incur whether the aircraft flies or sits rotting away. These expense tend to go up the longer the aircraft sits and can involve expensive restorations if allowed to sit for long enough. Many components are shelf life limited.

The rate of hourly expenses vary with the amount the aircraft is flown. The more you fly, the more your hourly expenses are reduced.


Assuming 100 hours per year, that is $95 per hour! Or $64 per hour if you fly it 200 hours a year. Hence, the more you fly the less expensive per hour it becomes.


http://www.jetcareers.com/content/view/29/51/

That second 100 hour block only cost you 3300 USD compared to the first 100 hour block at 9500 USD.

So you either want to fly an airplane as much as possible or get rid of it completely.

All the best,

Crumpp

Rachis
10-31-2008, 01:08 AM
I have always been an admirer of the BlackBird.

I have been told that the term "SkunkWorks" as indicated by the little skunk on some of the plane's tails, was started by workers at the building site of the SR-71 because the assembly building was down-wind from a farm or something in CA that smelled really bad. So, hence the name.


I once had the oportunity to spend about thirty minutes all alone with an SR 71 while at Edwards AFB. I have video of that. It is an amazing piece of work, that BlackBird.


Thanks for posting this Chocktaw.

What a remarkable plane.

PhantomKira
10-31-2008, 09:28 AM
That was one awsome aircraft, for sure.

The story I've heard behind the Skunk Works name is that origionally, the top secret design bereau was next to a chemical factory. Due to the stink of the chemicals, one of the guys answered a phone one day with "Skonk Works", the name of a popular cartoon or some such, at the time. He was disiplined, then re-enstated, when the name stuck, as Skunk Works.

Bo_Nidle
10-31-2008, 03:01 PM
Amazing aircraft! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

I saw the Blackbird several times at airshows during the late 80's. When I was stationed at RAF Honnington in 85-86 I used to se it coming home to RAF Mildenhall quite often as the USAF used to come in directly over our base, especially on Sundays. It was unusually quiet when coming into land.

There is a static example in the American Air Museum at Duxford.

MB_Avro_UK
10-31-2008, 03:14 PM
Thanks for posting http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

It was mentioned that the aircraft outran over 4,000 missiles fired at them http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

I assume that they weren't all fired on the same day...

JSG72
10-31-2008, 03:48 PM
Oh so! '60s Maaan!

M_Gunz
10-31-2008, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by Kettenhunde:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> You don't have to fly them all the time if you want to cut costs.


Hi M_Gunz,

That is not really true. Most people who have not owned an airplane do not realize this fact. Airplanes have fixed expenses you incur whether the aircraft flies or sits rotting away. These expense tend to go up the longer the aircraft sits and can involve expensive restorations if allowed to sit for long enough. Many components are shelf life limited.

The rate of hourly expenses vary with the amount the aircraft is flown. The more you fly, the more your hourly expenses are reduced.


Assuming 100 hours per year, that is $95 per hour! Or $64 per hour if you fly it 200 hours a year. Hence, the more you fly the less expensive per hour it becomes.


http://www.jetcareers.com/content/view/29/51/

That second 100 hour block only cost you 3300 USD compared to the first 100 hour block at 9500 USD.

So you either want to fly an airplane as much as possible or get rid of it completely.

All the best,

Crumpp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

It still costs more total. The break even point depends on what the use is and what it costs
to replace the vehicle or equivalent in function. In the case of the SR-71 that includes
retraining crew or training whole new crew. If there's a NEED to have constant special unique
type surveillance flights then they should fly more otherwise fly less. I just contend that
there are special unique profiles that that plane filled that justify the few time costs.

It's like owning a big pickup truck that you use enough times a year to justify having as
opposed to renting one that many times per year.
Sure if you drive it every day then the cost per mile is less. However it's far cheaper to
have a small car for every day use and save the truck for what the small car is not suitable.

M_Gunz
10-31-2008, 08:50 PM
Originally posted by PhantomKira:
That was one awsome aircraft, for sure.

The story I've heard behind the Skunk Works name is that origionally, the top secret design bereau was next to a chemical factory. Due to the stink of the chemicals, one of the guys answered a phone one day with "Skonk Works", the name of a popular cartoon or some such, at the time. He was disiplined, then re-enstated, when the name stuck, as Skunk Works.

L'il Abner?

Skunked is an old game and race term for when one player finishes before the other is halfway,
the loser is 'skunked'.

Kettenhunde
10-31-2008, 09:15 PM
In the case of the SR-71 that includes
retraining crew or training whole new crew.

There is much more to it than that. The SR-71 has a plethora of unique maintenance requirements. These requirements make it even more uneconomical to have sitting around becoming a hangerqueen. It would be unfit to fly and extremely expensive to bring back to airworthiness.


It's like owning a big pickup truck that you use enough times a year to justify having as
opposed to renting one that many times per year.
Sure if you drive it every day then the cost per mile is less. However it's far cheaper to
have a small car for every day use and save the truck for what the small car is not suitable.


You would be correct IF we were not talking about airplanes! Airplanes have shelf life limited components that must be replaced. For example, My aircrafts constant speed propeller has to be overhauled every 5 years or 2000 hours of operation. The cheap end is a few thousand dollars at the prop shop. Hoses are shelf life limited too. Replacing hoses on a "cheap" airplane is close to a thousand dollars.

Imagine the cost of overhauling the SR-71 engines or replacing all the hoses on the airplane? Tons of money would be spent having the aircraft do nothing but collect dust. Of couse at least you would be putting those specialized SR-71 A&P's to work instead of just paying them to hang around.

In the case of the SR-71, it is cheaper to get rid of it and invest the savings in the replacements operation.


I just contend that
there are special unique profiles that that plane filled that justify the few time costs.


I highly doubt the SR-71 would have been retired if it meant a loss of capability.

All the best,

Crumpp

DuxCorvan
11-01-2008, 04:52 AM
Anyway you look at it, the SR-71 represented a peak of aircraft high-performance technology that will be hard to meet again, for money reasons.

I'm afraid we will never see a Mach 3 plane in the skies again.

gdfo
11-01-2008, 05:14 AM
Well there is, supposedly, a replacement for the SR-71. I think the publicly known code name is 'Aurora'.

Keep in mind that the 'Blackbird' technology is 35-40 years old. Most of us are just not going to be 'in the know' as far as what can really be done now.
Due to inflation, of course any aircraft will be more expensive to produce but there is also the question of need. Do we need another 'spy plane?

I think that 'Aurora' is flying and not many will be produced. It is probably faster and also stealthy let alone much more technically advanced than 'Blackbird'. If it is flying I am sure that the general pubic will not know details for quite some time.

Phil_C
11-01-2008, 09:42 AM
That is definately my favorite airplane of all time-- ive seen three different versions in person- the A-12, the SR-71 and a YF-12... the only one i havent is the 2 seat trainer SR-71C.

When i was a kid i always wanted to fly one. No replacement, no matter how advanced, will ever have the same aura as the sled does.

Choctaw111
11-01-2008, 12:23 PM
Originally posted by gdfo:
Well there is, supposedly, a replacement for the SR-71. I think the publicly known code name is 'Aurora'.

Keep in mind that the 'Blackbird' technology is 35-40 years old. Most of us are just not going to be 'in the know' as far as what can really be done now.
Due to inflation, of course any aircraft will be more expensive to produce but there is also the question of need. Do we need another 'spy plane?

I think that 'Aurora' is flying and not many will be produced. It is probably faster and also stealthy let alone much more technically advanced than 'Blackbird'. If it is flying I am sure that the general pubic will not know details for quite some time.

Several years ago I have heard of this "Aurora" and asked a good friend with top secret clearance in the Air Force about it. He said he couldn't talk about it, but what he did say were that strange anomalies in the atmosphere and some earth tremors were attributed by "something" that he couldn't discuss http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif
We talked about this 10 years ago or more.

Schwarz.13
11-01-2008, 01:19 PM
Originally posted by Choctaw111:
Several years ago I have heard of this "Aurora" and asked a good friend with top secret clearance in the Air Force about it. He said he couldn't talk about it, but what he did say were that strange anomalies in the atmosphere and some earth tremors were attributed by "something" that he couldn't discuss http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif
We talked about this 10 years ago or more.

http://img.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05_01/xfileslapR2904_468x318.jpg

"This Choctaw knows something about Aurora!"

b2spirita
11-02-2008, 09:12 AM
I love this plane, even got to touch it at duxford. It looked strange with its skin wrinkled,needed because of the thermal expansion it experiences at its flight speed. Apparently it would leak fuel while taxing to take off for the same reason.

WhiteKnight77
11-02-2008, 01:41 PM
Here are a couple of pics I took many years ago.

http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/habuthumb.jpg (http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/habu.jpg)

http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/hhthumb.jpg (http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/hh.jpg)

Choctaw111
11-02-2008, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by WhiteKnight77:
Here are a couple of pics I took many years ago.

http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/habuthumb.jpg (http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/habu.jpg)

http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/hhthumb.jpg (http://www.whiteknight77.net/images/hh.jpg)

Good stuff. How many years ago was that? Couldn't get any closer? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

WhiteKnight77
11-03-2008, 12:00 AM
I probably took them in 83. The closest I got to the SR-71 is the pic in the hanger. Highway 58 runs behind the hanger on Okinawa and riding in a duece and a half with no top allowed me to get what I did. I have some other pics of the Habu being towed to a maintence spot at the end of the taxiway, but if I had been caught taking the pics, I would have lost the film if not otherwise in trouble.

I had a tendency to break the rules now and then. Ya just had to be cool about it.

I loved seeing it take off just after dusk as it passed over my base 5 miles south of Kadena. You could barely make out it's silhouette, it's rotating beacon and 2 blue-white cones of fire from it's exhaust.