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jazman777
11-16-2004, 09:12 PM
It's seems pretty clear to me that of all the groups in IL2, the US Army Air Force is by far the most flamboyant in decorating aircraft. Just so you don't think, "it's those Americans" I think the USN is by far the dullest. Just look at the custom skins at il2skins.com.

Zyzbot
11-16-2004, 09:34 PM
Yes...some could be just a bit flamboyant!

http://www.fiddlersgreen.net/AC/aircraft/Consolidated-B-24/b24_info/image-3a.jpg

A.K.Davis
11-16-2004, 10:56 PM
IJAAF wins hands down for aesthetics.

VFA-195 Snacky
11-16-2004, 11:22 PM
K.I.S.S.

Keep It Simple Stupid

Capt._Tenneal
11-16-2004, 11:29 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by A.K.Davis:
IJAAF wins hands down for aesthetics. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Aesthetics can be a personal opinion, but I agree that the Japanese had some of the, ahem, more colorful camo schemes of WW II. Especially the ones I can describe as sort of a dazzle pattern, and the " little squiggly stuff " pattern. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

Phil_C
11-16-2004, 11:42 PM
I dunno if the formation ships ever flew a combat mission.. but if they didnt im kinda glad they didnt cause man what a target they would be http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

stansdds
11-17-2004, 03:42 AM
Formation ships did not fly in combat, they were already veterans and were war weary, but had sufficient life left in them to serve such purposes.

As far as I know, the USN policy allowed no art work on USN aircraft and this was pretty well enforced. The Marines were a little more lax about this policy and the Army did not seem to care unless the aircraft were stationed where they could be easily viewed by civilians around an airbase.

Capt._Tenneal
11-17-2004, 07:58 AM
Were the USA the only major combatant (or even nation) to regularly christen individual aircraft with names in WW II ?

Inadaze
11-17-2004, 08:03 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Capt._Tenneal:
Were the USA the only major combatant (or even nation) to regularly christen individual aircraft with names in WW II ? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

The RAF named aircraft as well. I dunno about the Fleet Air Arm though.

S! Inadaze

A.K.Davis
11-17-2004, 08:08 AM
IJAAF named aircraft to a degree, although not in the American way of drawing inspirations from sweethearts and popular culture. Much more symbolic. Like the Luftwaffe, personal emblems were used at times.

The skin we have in game for the Ki-61-Hei (actually a historical skin from a Ki-61-Tei) says "sword" on the engine cowling, for example.

Chuck_Older
11-17-2004, 10:28 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Capt._Tenneal:
Were the USA the only major combatant (or even nation) to regularly christen individual aircraft with names in WW II ? <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well, it wasn't as common as the movies make it out to be. It wasn't a rare sight by any means, but not every aircraft had such markings of course, and lamost no pilot seems to have referred to his aircraft or an aircraft he shared with another pilot, byt the name on the plane. Mostly, as mentioned, it was the Army that got away with that. USN and USMC had less of a 'personal' aircraft, although some a/c did have some degree of embellishment beyond a squadron insignia.

The RAF had 'presentation aircraft', such as The Hendon Pegasus, but the pilot's didn't name the plane. The US did this too, and the presentation name usually stayed with the a/c. In the RAF, there were strict rules about defacing the property of the King, so: no painted jackets, no personalised aircraft was the norm.

Soviet aircraft had a degree of embellishment, but it seems to have tended towards slogans like "death to Fascists!" and "For Stalin!", which, I think, was a heck of a good idea to put on your aircraft in the Soviet Union, it might save your hide some day. "Stalin Smells Bad!" would have been on the nose of a plane piloted by a person with a very short career (and life)

German aircraft carried artwork more along the lines of heraldric symbols. I can't think of any that bore a name, but there must have been some.

Italian aircraft seem to have carried little embellishment

Zyzbot
11-17-2004, 10:40 AM
I have a book "Markings and Camouflage Systems of Luftwaffe Aircraft in WWII Vol.III".

It show photos of a small number of Luftwaffe aircraft with individual names...usually painted just under the cockpit.
One photo is of a Bf-109G-5 flown by Barkhorn. It has the name "Christi" on it. Another is a photo of a FW-190 from JG2 with the name "Pippimann!" painted under the cockpit.

A.K.Davis
11-17-2004, 03:13 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Zyzbot:
I have a book "Markings and Camouflage Systems of Luftwaffe Aircraft in WWII Vol.III".

It show photos of a small number of Luftwaffe aircraft with individual names...usually painted just under the cockpit.
One photo is of a Bf-109G-5 flown by Barkhorn. It has the name "Christi" on it. Another is a photo of a FW-190 from JG2 with the name "Pippimann!" painted under the cockpit. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Wasn't there a Dora that had the name "Gerti" on the side? Will look at home.

Also, kill markings on Japanese markings were for the aircraft, not the pilot. There was some personalization, especially with high-morale, high-publicity units like the 244th Sentai, but emphasis remained on a collective spirit. In fact, some have speculated that the clover leaf sometimes depicted on a Ki-61 flown by 244th Sentai CO Kobayashi as his personal emblem may have been the work of a bored Allied occupier, since the "lucky clover" had no significance in Japanese culture.