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exup25th
04-06-2005, 08:46 AM
are there any settings I have missed for the ground steering of aircraft..
Or are they just poorly set up I cannot believe that planes such as the YP80 will not steer at all on its nosewheel unless you apply power and stamp the brakes on...
Also the spitfire only when you crack the throttle open..
Alot of aircraft seem to steer badly on the ground in these ways... I realise with multiengine aircraft you can use one side engines only.. but not on single engined..

Taylortony
04-06-2005, 12:32 PM
use the rudder one way and press the B this gives you differential braking on one side only and it will spin on a dime............... this is the way it happens in real life as well, trust me i do it for a living http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

exup25th
04-06-2005, 01:53 PM
even with the shooting star? ? jeez no wonder the engines were so unreliable they would have used half its working life getting the jet to the runway http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

mortoma
04-06-2005, 04:14 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Taylortony:
use the rudder one way and press the B this gives you differential braking on one side only and it will spin on a dime............... this is the way it happens in real life as well, trust me i do it for a living http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>You must not have flown every plane out there then because some planes do ( and did in WWII ) have real, honest-to-goodness nose wheel steering. Most big jets have nose wheel steering whereby the nosewheel actually turns. This is true of many small aircraft also, both new and old. In the case of really, really big heavies, they might not use the rudder pedals at low speed to steer, but a tiller wheel ( almost like a steering wheel ) to turn the nosewheel. In most cases, differential braking can be used to augment true nosewheel steering. Or even differential thrust in the case of some aircraft.

Now, as for this sim, nosewheel steering is not modelled. The nosewheel appears to turn but it doesn't "bite" into the ground. So therefore all you have is differential braking or prop wash across the rudder. Now in the case of the jets in this sim, since they have no propwash, all you have is differential braking or thrust. This is why jets such as the Me-262 are so darned hard to steer on the ground. Now you are an expert on nosewheel steering, in RL and in the sim.

Taylortony
04-06-2005, 04:34 PM
yup i know.......... I could draw the system for you http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif btw some of the ruskie stuff has differential braking on the nose wheels like their VC10ski

F16_Petter
04-07-2005, 03:59 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><font size="-1">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by exup25th:
are there any settings I have missed for the ground steering of aircraft..
Or are they just poorly set up I cannot believe that planes such as the YP80 will not steer at all on its nosewheel unless you apply power and stamp the brakes on...
Also the spitfire only when you crack the throttle open..
Alot of aircraft seem to steer badly on the ground in these ways... I realise with multiengine aircraft you can use one side engines only.. but not on single engined.. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Still you are right.
Planes with nws in general behave really bad on ground.

Example: YP80,262, P38, P39, etc.
Its simple, just watch the outside views and compare output of actual output.

Doesnt take a rocket scientist to see that its really badly modelled.

A parking brake would imo also be nice.
(like the brake chocks but more like a parkingbrake, that would work not only on ships)

Anyway it seems they are focusing on getting the flight model correct in the AIR and not on the ground, for obvious reasons.

However 99% of all aircraft start from the ground/carrier nomatter what you belive. Thats why I think they should look into the groundhandling in the next sim.
(BOB)

AlGroover
04-07-2005, 04:16 AM
I've got throttle bound to mousewheel, wheel brakes to right mouse button (left hand) and rudder to twisty stick (right hand). This makes taxiing much easier.

exup25th
04-07-2005, 05:15 AM
its a shame cos I am trying to persuade some of our lock on guys to try IL2 merged... but they like their jets...
We have an ex USAF pilot who cut his teeth in the old jets just after the Korean War so he will have missed out on the F-80 shooting star but he loves the way the planes handle..
Im just comparing the way the jets taxi in lock on and how they do it in IL2... I know they are different games and lock on is more "focused" but I still prefer the flight in IL2...
Bugger the radar and ecm etc etc... just give me the fly by xtick and an engine and let me fly it...
just a shame about the taxi service..(sic)

zetareticulan
04-07-2005, 07:35 AM
turning down the magnetos makes gunning the motor on the deck, to bump the tail round, seem a little less stressful.