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budvar62
10-01-2004, 08:34 AM
Being of the Brit persuasion myself I was wondering if there were any truly bizarre British efforts to rival the Luftwaffes flights of fancy. And I came across this from the Miles Co. !!! If I knew how to put the picture on I would, but here's a link. BTW the website is very interesting - whole load of Brit-mobiles I'd never even heard of...from the Second World War.

http://www.jaapteeuwen.com/ww2aircraft/pictures/gallery/miles%20m39b.jpg.html

budvar62
10-01-2004, 08:34 AM
Being of the Brit persuasion myself I was wondering if there were any truly bizarre British efforts to rival the Luftwaffes flights of fancy. And I came across this from the Miles Co. !!! If I knew how to put the picture on I would, but here's a link. BTW the website is very interesting - whole load of Brit-mobiles I'd never even heard of...from the Second World War.

http://www.jaapteeuwen.com/ww2aircraft/pictures/gallery/miles%20m39b.jpg.html

blairgowrie
10-01-2004, 09:36 AM
Great link Budvar62. I have bookmarked it and plan to do some research this evening. Some very interesting stuff. Perhaps we can interest Oleg!

Mashie_Nibblick
10-01-2004, 10:17 AM
Great stuff, Budvar. Ta!

x6BL_Brando
10-01-2004, 10:46 AM
Thanks for the excellent link m8

I guess the title is fairly misleading in that many of the planes shown saw no combat service in World War 2, they were just on the RAF manifest at the outbreak of war. Many of the older birds that did go into action were just blown out of the skies by the more up-to-date Axis fighters - the Fairy Battle being one of the most well-known examples http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif
In fact it's mostly a fascinating catalogue of aircraft development in the inter-war years, but no less interesting for that.
I think it brings home the point of why Britain didn't make a pre-emptive strike against Germany in the late Thirties - we had no suitable air-force with which to go up against the Luftwaffe, as the Spanish Civil War had clearly demonstrated. Neville Chamberlain's policy of appeasement may well be reviled by historical pundits, but it was driven by the need to catch up with the technological advances made by Germany in the mid-to-late Thirties.

Great link, TY