PDA

View Full Version : The PFC SH3 Rolling Quiz (PFC = Post Forum Crash)



Pages : [1] 2 3 4 5 6

Realjambo
01-22-2007, 05:05 AM
Rules are sinple really, and designed so we all can learn a bit about our favourite U-Boats and Submarines and everything related to them http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

1. Questions must be U-Boat related, and (in light of SH4 coming soon) and now also Submarine related.

2. Only ONE question can be 'active' at any one time. The person who anserw the previous question correctly has to post the new question.

3. Please have a 'source' for your answer - questions can come from the internet, books, films, documentaries.

4. If a question is unanswered after 48 hours then a new question will have to be posted by the orginal question setter.

5. Any disputes will be judged and settled by Realjambo.

The first question is the one I used to start the old quiz, but do you remember the answer?

Q: What was a 'Donkey's Breakfast' on a British Merchant Vessel during WW2?

VikingGrandad
01-22-2007, 05:20 AM
RJ, I will send you a PDF of the quiz pages that I managed to get from Google cache. You may want to add it to your initial post as a reference to the old questions.

Realjambo
01-22-2007, 05:36 AM
Thanks VG, that's be great. Good to see we are all pulling together and working through this disaster! Ah, that human spirit shining through in times of adversity - warms the cockles eh? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Goose_Green
01-22-2007, 05:40 AM
I know I got the inital question right, but is the same question open for answering again? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Realjambo
01-22-2007, 09:52 AM
Yes Goose, then you can post a never before asked one.

Realjambo
01-23-2007, 11:36 PM
I'll reveal the answer 'A donkey's breakfast' was the term used for the straw bedding used by mervhant sailors to sleep on below decks.

Next question is anyone's to post!

hueywolf123
01-24-2007, 03:56 PM
'Titty Oggy' refers to what exactly? Old salts please step back and let the noobs tackle this

FongFongFong
01-24-2007, 04:03 PM
Originally posted by hueywolf123:
'Titty Oggy' refers to what exactly? Old salts please step back and let the noobs tackle this http://forum.piratesahoy.com/style_emoticons/default/24.gif

Google gave quite an interesting response for this one, but obviously not what you had in mind.

Realjambo
01-25-2007, 05:08 PM
I'm intrigued... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/crackwhip.gif

Realjambo
01-26-2007, 01:09 PM
A shameless bump!

Are we bored of the quiz? Has it run it's course?

Celeon999
01-26-2007, 01:38 PM
Ok ... to give the quiz a new kickstart :

I take the liberty to put a non u-boat related question as first one in this new thread.

Is that ok ? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

It stays of course within the naval area http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The next questions should be u-boat related again.


Who was the only non-german who was awared the Knight's Cross , even with Oak Leaves and Swords ?

I gave already a little hint...

Minoos
01-26-2007, 01:39 PM
Old salts please step back
That may be the reason?

Celeon999
01-26-2007, 01:41 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif

Do we have already a question running ?

Sorry http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

Forget my post

Realjambo
01-26-2007, 01:51 PM
Thanks guys. Hueywolf you need to reveal your answer - the stipulated 48 hours is practically up http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

geoffwessex
01-26-2007, 02:28 PM
Don't know about that spelling, but a "Tiddy-Oggy" is a Cornish pasty.

Realjambo
01-26-2007, 02:38 PM
I just found explanation of 'Titty Oggy' but couldn't possibly post it here! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Minoos
01-26-2007, 02:47 PM
if unsure ask Dr. Ruth http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Realjambo
01-27-2007, 10:52 AM
@ Hueywolf - Go, give us your answer then, I can't wait to know what it is!...

In the meantime, given the different time zones we all live in, I suggest we go with Celeon's question - It is the 'Rolling' quiz after all http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Celeon asked:

Ok ... to give the quiz a new kickstart :

I take the liberty to put a non u-boat related question as first one in this new thread.

Is that ok ? Sad Eyes

It stays of course within the naval area Smile

The next questions should be u-boat related again.


Who was the only non-german who was awared the Knight's Cross , even with Oak Leaves and Swords ?

I gave already a little hint...

geoffwessex
01-27-2007, 11:47 AM
Shot in the dark..... Mussolini?

Celeon999
01-27-2007, 11:57 AM
Originally posted by geoffwessex:
Shot in the dark..... Mussolini?

Nope. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Of course not. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

You dont get it for being unsuccessful in war and definitly not for running away from the enemy http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif


Celeon remembers the common german joke about italian tanks......three gears for forward and six for backwards http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/mockface.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Abd_von_Mumit
01-27-2007, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by Celeon999:
Celeon remembers the common german joke about italian tanks...... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Does Celeon need an invitation to share the joke to others?

Celeon999
01-27-2007, 12:08 PM
Originally posted by Abd_von_Mumit:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Celeon999:
Celeon remembers the common german joke about italian tanks...... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
Does Celeon need an invitation to share the joke to others? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Ok hmmmm..wait....what was it like....ah yes....

Why do italian tanks have three gears for driving forwards but six for driving backwards...? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Answer : When the enemy shows up......It just takes too much time to turn the tank around ... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Realjambo
01-27-2007, 12:58 PM
The Grand Library at Jambo Towers reveals it was this chap?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/150px-Gerardus_Mooyman3.jpg

Gerardus Mooyman was born in Apeldoorn, Netherlands. He grew up in a very pro-German household. His father was a small time retailer whose business suffered greatly during the great depression, resulting in his joining of the NSB in hope of a better future. Mooyman spent his youth hearing superlatives about Hitler and Nazi Germany and admiring the German victories across Europe.

His father wanted Mooyman to work in the family business but he preferred a military career, so in 1941 he volunteered to serve in the 4th SS Volunteer Panzergrenadier Brigade Netherlands, and was sent to the eastern front as an anti tank gun commander. In the battle at Lake Ladoga he destroyed 13 tanks, for this action he was the first non-German to be awarded the Knight's Cross. By the end of his service on the front he was credited with destroying 23 Soviet tanks.

As the first non-German to be awarded the Knight's Cross the Nazi propaganda widely published his story in newspapers and magazines, he was congratulated personally by Himmler and, like a showpiece, he had to show up at dozens of receptions, parties and parades. He was illustrated as an example to the Dutch youth.

Celeon999
01-27-2007, 01:15 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif


http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Celeon is staggered by Real Jambo's knowledge...


Especially when considering the fact.... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

That Celeon didnt knew that http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Thats was actually not the person i had in mind....

It looks like there was more than just one non-german who was awarded with the Knight's Cross.

The person Celeon is asking for was additionaly awarded the Oakleaves and Swords to the Knight's Cross.


But due to Real Jambo's knowledge, the honor of asking the next question goes to him http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif


Maybe someone can tell who the person is that Celeon had in mind ? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif


UPDATE : I did some closer research and found out that there were several non-german Knight's Cross holders, for example some from Romania. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

But there was only one with Oakleaves and Swords http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

It looks like the definition of my question was also unlucky formulated... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

Anyway....RJ gets the next question. An additional http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif to the one who can tell me who the !! only non-german with Knight's Cross and Oakleaves aswell as Swords was !! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I can give more hints if needed http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
01-27-2007, 02:26 PM
Thank you Celeon.

My question:

Meet Albrecht Brandi:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/Albrecht.jpg

My apologies - I've edited the last part of my question, having realsied it wasn't correct - It may help you!

I'd like to know which type of British vessel did he sink and roughly where, the destruction of which saved a convoy of fifty German ships that went on to take part <STRIKE>in an important land invasion</STRIKE> in a historic siege of an Allied held Island.

Realjambo
01-29-2007, 02:32 AM
*Bump* http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

Celeon999
01-29-2007, 03:14 AM
Was it the HMS Welshman ? A mine layer ?

She was protecting Malta and Brandi sunk her with U-617 on February 1943.

Realjambo
01-29-2007, 03:25 AM
Correct Celeon!

Well done. Over to you....

Celeon999
01-29-2007, 03:44 AM
I think there was a little flaw in the quiz as most people arent online during the weekend. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Please give me some time for my next question http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Ok first i would like to reveal the answer to my question which obviously nobody could`nt answer http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

The only non-german who recieved the Knight`s Cross <span class="ev_code_GREEN">with</span> Oakleaves and Swords was ....

Fleet Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto.

Yamamoto was given the task to plan the attack on Pearl Harbor although he was utmost opposing a war with the USA. He himself studied at the Harvard University.

He is also responsible for the quick victories in the first month of the war in the pacific.
He commanded the fleet which sunk the HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse.

Yamamoto took his first defeat in the battle of Midway.

After his death in 1943 (his plane was shot down as he was on a tour visiting japanese military bases) he was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oakleaves and Swords posthumously.

I think he would not had liked that very much. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif He was the first one who openly said that an alliance with the third Reich would lead Japan into a catastrophy.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/06/Yamamoto-Isoroku-improvedContrast.jpg/260px-Yamamoto-Isoroku-improvedContrast.jpg

Celeon999
01-29-2007, 11:31 AM
Ok here is my question :


Who can tell me the name of the Kaleun that died in an accident while on patrol ?

And what happened to him and how did it happen ?

Realjambo
01-31-2007, 01:10 PM
Shameless, brazen, unadulterated, unequivocal...BUMP! time is running out http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

EDIT: Actually, time HAS run out. Celeon, your answer please my friend....

Another EDIT: Not exactly an accident, but read this, the last two paragraphs especially... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

U-505 from History.Net (http://www.historynet.com/air_sea/amphibious_operationss/3027686.html?page=3&c=y)

Celeon999
01-31-2007, 01:40 PM
Ok here is the answer:

It was Kapitänleutnant Mützelburg. He used to sport dive from the conning tower of his boat while beeing in the "Atlantic gap".

Although Teddy Suhren warned him that this is dangerous because of the oil tanks at the side of the boats hull that are hardly visible because they are under the waterline.

Then one day it happened, Mützelburg jumped from the tower , hit one of the tanks and broke his neck.

He was brought aboard but died shortly after. The IWO had to take command of the boat.

Through that incident , Doenitz forbid every form of bathing in the sea and other unnecessary activities that might endanger the crews or officers.

Messervy
01-31-2007, 05:34 PM
Nice question it was.
I`ll surely remember this one. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Realjambo
02-01-2007, 01:17 AM
Through that incident , Doenitz forbid every form of bathing in the sea and other unnecessary activities that might endanger the crews or officers.


That rings a bell now http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Do you have a new question Celeon? if not I have a couple. Your call.

Celeon999
02-01-2007, 02:27 AM
Not at the moment so...its your turn RJ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
02-02-2007, 06:48 AM
OK,

I'd like to know how much a VIIC cost to build in Reichmarks of the time.

Clue: It's, er, quite a lot! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Rudeltaktik1963
02-02-2007, 07:31 AM
Best I can come up with is the targets costs for mid 1930s give 6 million rm. I suspect costs to build a type c in 1939 onwards would be quite a lot more, so I'll guess at 10 million rm.

Realjambo
02-02-2007, 07:46 AM
Less than that Rudeltaktik, but good effort!

Minoos
02-02-2007, 08:30 AM
I'll place my bid:
2.5 million Reichsmark

VikingGrandad
02-02-2007, 10:13 AM
I think Minoos is right: 2.5 million Reichsmark is the cost I've found for a Type VII, but I don't know whether this is for a VIIC or VIIB.

Realjambo
02-02-2007, 12:56 PM
The excellent book "Convoy" by Martin Middlebrook (ISBN 0-304--36578-5)states on page 61:

"The average cost of a Type VIIC was 3 million Reichmarks - £300,000 or $1.2 million"

So I'll accept Minoos and VG's answer of 2.5 million, seeing as the book states the cost as an average.

Over to you two, whoever posts first! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

VikingGrandad
02-04-2007, 03:39 AM
Minoos handed me the honour of asking the next question, so here goes:

After the introduction of airborne radar, Coastal Command still had a problem with its ASW aircraft being spotted by U-boats during the day, thus giving the U-boats time to dive before they could be attacked. How did Coastal Command solve this problem?

Realjambo
02-07-2007, 04:53 AM
I'm stumped but I just know as soon as you tell us I'll know it!

VG it's time to reveal your answer.......

Goose_Green
02-07-2007, 05:24 AM
Attacking from the direction of the sun?

VikingGrandad
02-07-2007, 06:11 AM
Goose is thinking along the right lines (i.e. something practical rather than technology-based).

The answer is that Coastal Command painted the aircraft the same grey colour as the Atlantic sea/sky. It's hard to see why they didn't do this in the first place... They had the capability to develop airborne radar that could detect the small profile of a surfaced U-boat (which the BdU ruled out as impossible), but their aircraft weren't adequately camouflaged!

My source is Andrew Williams' "Battle of the Atlantic" documentary.

I'll post my new question when I get home this evening http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

geoffwessex
02-07-2007, 09:54 AM
I'd love to know more about how those Sunderlands operated - surely they didn't dive quite so steeply as they do in SH3. That's a big aircraft to pull out of such a steep dive more than once or twice! I can understand them patrolling high in the sky (relatively) to allow their radar to get better coverage, but I'd have thought they'd get low and then make an attack run. Anybody know?

Kaleun1961
02-07-2007, 11:45 AM
They'd come in low, in order to drop their depth charges or bombs with accuracy and also to bring their guns to bear. Being a large, lumbering aircraft they could not employ dive bomber tactics. Try imagining a B-17 acting as a dive bomber; same thing with the Sunderland.

geoffwessex
02-07-2007, 01:39 PM
Thanks, Kaleun - confirms my thoughts. Quite imaginative about aircraft tactics, those original SH3 devs!

Right VG - excellent question, let's have another, please!

VikingGrandad
02-07-2007, 06:40 PM
I hope someone gets this one:

What security measure did BdU take to help ensure that a U-boat commander's patrol orders were protected from enemy capture? (I'm referring to the orders which the commander left shore with, not those transmitted to the U-boat whilst at sea)

Realjambo
02-08-2007, 05:17 AM
I think the orders were printed on water soluble paper? Easily disolved and destroyed in the event of being captured or abandoning ship.

VikingGrandad
02-08-2007, 06:08 AM
You are close RJ http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Minoos
02-08-2007, 06:58 AM
Could be water soluble ink?

Realjambo
02-08-2007, 12:41 PM
Is it a combination of all these recent guesses?

In that it was ink and paper that was dissolvable when it came inot contact with air after sa, an hour?

Or is that just a bit too James Bond? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

VikingGrandad
02-08-2007, 01:54 PM
Minoos - you are correct. Another simple solution to a very important problem.

RJ, like I said, you were almost there http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

My source, as before, is Andrew Williams' "Battle of the Atlantic" documentary. The programme includes an interview with an ex-BdU staff officer, who had the tedious responsibility of drying the water-soluble ink on the patrol orders, by hanging dozens of pages on washing lines in a small room at Doenitz' 'Sardine Tin' (remember my earlier question?)

It's your turn to pose a question Minoos! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Minoos
02-08-2007, 02:19 PM
I have to thank RJ for giving me the hint which reminded me of U-571 movie. It has some information about the ink used for the documents...

- New question -

Which u-boat had an emblem which was the actual logo of an existing car manufacturer during WW2? This u-boat had a specific mission affecting India's history.


Edit: This is how a car logo could look like on a u-boat... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
http://img397.imageshack.us/img397/259/driverci2.jpg

Minoos
02-10-2007, 10:04 AM
I'll give a hint...
That boat had 2 Indian passengers during a transport mission..

VikingGrandad
02-10-2007, 10:12 AM
Thanks for the clue Minoos, I was struggling to find anything!

I'm fairly sure the emblem is the griffin badge of Vauxhall Motors, but can't find any U-boat associations for this symbol in uboat.net's emblem index...

Minoos
02-10-2007, 10:16 AM
Sorry if I brought some confusion with the picture...
I is not related to the question and the emblem is from Bedford car company.

Zuzaman
02-10-2007, 11:15 AM
U-180.

Bearing the emblem same as of the Mercedes. It was used primarily in spying and transporting operation.
As far as I know they even trasnported an Indian leader on it to a Japanese submarine.

Minoos
02-10-2007, 11:52 AM
Zuzaman has the right answer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

The Mercedes logo exists since 1937 (http://gawlowski.com/matt/cars/car_logos.html) ( u-180 logo (http://www.uboataces.com/ref-insignia14.shtml) ).


A brief information about u-180 can be fount at http://uboat.net/ops/monsun2.htm .


SOURCE (http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/ETO/Ultra/SRH-008/SRH008-14.html) 3. The exchange of Subhas Chandra Bose.

The first Indian Ocean cruise not undertaken primarily for offensive purposes involved the transportation of Subhas Chandra Bose, former president of the All-India Congress and an agitator of pro-Japanese persuasion, from Germany to Japan so as to enable him to enter India at the heels of the victorious Japanese army. Bose was embarked on the U-180 (Musenberg) and left Germany on 9 February 1943. During the cruise information on Indian activities was passed to Bose by means of special "Nelke" messages. These messages provided the first clue to the existence and then the identity of the passenger. They were also of great value in analyzing the workings of the Free India Movement and in identifying the participants.

Undismayed by the presence of such "distinguished" supercargo, Musenberg attempted offensive action during the outbound cruise, managing to sink one ship.

Bose was transferred to a Japanese submarine at a rendezvous in the Indian Ocean late in April. In addition, German torpedoes and mail were exchanged for Japanese inventions, apparatus, gold, quinine, and Japanese naval technical personnel. After unproductive patrolling along the southeast African coast, Musenberg returned to the Bay of Biscay. In order to prove to the Japanese the comparative safety of U-boat transport operations, Musenberg and his crew were instructed to "dispel the fears already entertained by the Japanese command in regard to the Biscay cruise . . .by appropriate attitude and conduct of your whole crew . . .under no circumstances is the attention of the Japanese to be drawn to any special endangerment of the Bay of Biscay." (Shark 1304/24 June 1943) Nevertheless, the Japanese attention was forcibly called to this condition by Allied aircraft which attacked U-180 the day before it reached port, 1 July 1943. A record of this trip, kept by the Weapons Officer on the U-180, was among the documents taken from U-505, whose commander, Lange, was that Weapons Officer.

Zuzaman
02-10-2007, 12:45 PM
Which is the submarine class still used in several eastern countries and it's based on the famous Elektroboot construction?


Edit: How come I can't see this post in the topic but only seperately when browsing my recent posts? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

Realjambo
02-10-2007, 12:52 PM
Originally posted by Zuzaman:


Edit: How come I can't see this post in the topic but only seperately when browsing my recent posts? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

I had the same thing earlier, it sorts itself after a little while.

Zuzaman
02-10-2007, 12:56 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
I had the same thing earlier, it sorts itself after a little while.

Ah yes it works now okay. I'll get used to it.

VikingGrandad
02-10-2007, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by Zuzaman:
Which is the submarine class still used in several eastern countries and it's based on the famous Elektroboot construction?
Was its the Soviet 'Zulu' and 'Whiskey' submarine classes, based on captured Type XXI's the Soviets adopted after WW2?


Originally posted by Zuzaman:
Edit: How come I can't see this post in the topic but only seperately when browsing my recent posts? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif
Hmm. I've not seen this happen before in a thread created after the forum crash.

Zuzaman
02-10-2007, 01:03 PM
VikingGrandad, you are very close. But the class I'm asking about is still actively used in some countries' navy and as traning facilities in others'.

Zuzaman
02-12-2007, 09:23 AM
So no one knows the answer?

The class has the same male name as a character has in a famous drama.

VikingGrandad
02-12-2007, 10:15 AM
One more try: is it the Chinese 'Romeo' class (derived from the Whiskey and Zulu classes) currently operated by N.Korea, Bulgaria and Egypt, and formerly by Russia, Syria and Algeria?

Zuzaman
02-12-2007, 10:33 AM
That's it! I've read it's a Soviet design, but yes we thought about the same class nevertheless:


The Romeo class ('Project 633) is a class of Soviet diesel-electric submarine, built in 1950s. The origin of the Romeo class can be traced to the WW2 German Type XXI U-boat. At the end of World War II, the Soviets obtained several German Type XXI U-boats, from which they were able to obtain certain key technologies. These technologies assisted in the design of the Zulu- and Whiskey-class. Further improvements on the design lead to the Romeo class.

By today's standards, the Romeo class submarine is considered obsolete, but still have some value as training and surveillance vessels.

VikingGrandad
02-12-2007, 10:45 AM
Great http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Here's the info I found:


Several navies operate or have operated Romeo class submarines:

* Russia and the Soviet Union had several Romeo class vessels in service. These vessels are no longer used as combat vessels in the Russian navy, although some may remain in service as immobile training facilities.
* North Korea operates several Romeo class submarines, that were both locally assembled with Chinese supplied parts and directly imported from China, and the 4 Chinese imported units are based on the western coast.
* Bulgaria operates one Romeo class submarine, which is the last remaining of several boats that were exported from the former Soviet Union.
* Syria has discarded the single Romeo class submarine that it imported from the Soviet Union.
* Egypt operates four Romeo class submarines that are upgraded variants of the Chinese design.
* Algeria has discarded its Soviet Romeo class submarines.


I'll look for a new question later this evening... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

VikingGrandad
02-12-2007, 04:19 PM
Here's a question that came to mind after reading K61's 'Only Female to Win the Iron Cross?' thread:

Which WW2 U-boat, when it sank, not only the saw the loss of her entire crew and captain, but also the captain's wife? And what were the names of the unfortunate captain and his wife?

Notes:

1. The captain's wife was not an Iron Cross winner (as far as I am aware).

2. There are differing accounts as to whether the U-boat struck a mine or was attacked by aircraft.

Minoos
02-14-2007, 08:58 AM
... checked the list of all u-boats losses ( http://uboat.net/fates/index.html )
None is listed with more causalities than crew count!
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif Have to keep searching.

VikingGrandad
02-14-2007, 09:42 AM
It wouldn't be the first time that uboat.net's data is incomplete.

I can tell you that I found the details on another prominent U-boat site http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

ottoramsaig
02-14-2007, 09:55 AM
non-german who was awared the Knight's Cross

Gerardus Mooyman

VikingGrandad
02-14-2007, 10:55 AM
Originally posted by ottoramsaig:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">non-german who was awared the Knight's Cross

Gerardus Mooyman </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

ottoramsaig - whose question are you answering?!

Realjambo
02-14-2007, 02:31 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

Are you a question or two behind ottoramsaig? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

VikingGrandad
02-15-2007, 03:22 PM
BUMP!

Realjambo
02-15-2007, 03:30 PM
Good call there VG - I think what with the SH4 Deluxe Edition news breaking, some threads are going to take a temporary dip!

Now, where were we on the quiz....

VikingGrandad
02-15-2007, 04:07 PM
A clue:

The incident happened in Kiel Bay during 1945.

Kaleun1961
02-15-2007, 07:06 PM
I believe time is up for this one to be revealed?

Realjambo
02-16-2007, 12:37 AM
I believe time is up for this one to be revealed?


Indeed it is. A good question, I'm intrigued to read the answer! VG if you would oblige....

VikingGrandad
02-16-2007, 03:19 AM
The answer is U-923 commanded by OLt.z.S Heino Frömmer-Carus (also known as Heinz Frömmer). He took his wife on board for a cruise in Kiel Bay and the boat was subsequently attacked and sunk by aircraft on 9th February 1945, all hands lost. His wife's name was Margrit. It was her 21st birthday the day before the incident. The captain was 24.

My source... I had read about the incident recently, but can't remember where. Fortunately, there is some information on ubootwaffe.net: U-923 Crew list (http://ubootwaffe.net/crews/crews.cgi?uquery=1;boatnum=923)

Given the stage of the war when this happened and the risk of taking civilians on board a U-boat, was Frömmer perhaps trying to smuggle his wife out of the country?

Minoos
02-16-2007, 03:30 AM
The tragic details that would explain why his wife was on board!


topic (http://ubootwaffe.net/forum/viewtopic.php?p=1071&sid=e5d75f04c388abfda57d5a031a5ca94a)

Just got a e-mail from Horst with the list of U-923. sunk 08.02.1945 in kiel bay.
When they raised U-923 in Jan 1953 they found the body of Margrit Frömmer-Carus wife of commander OLt.z.S. Heino Frömmer-Carus.
As she was born 08.02.1924, maybe he gave her a 21st birthday present.the trip of a life time.
Sad to say it was not a nice present.

VikingGrandad
02-16-2007, 03:51 AM
Thanks for the extra info Minoos.

I don't have another question ready yet (and won't have time to find one until tonight), so if anyone else has a question they'd like to ask, fire away.

Realjambo
02-16-2007, 04:44 PM
Open to any fellow Kaleun who has a question to post. I have one but I'll give it 12 hours from noe to allow anyone else a go.

Realjambo
02-17-2007, 08:32 AM
OK, Seeing as SHIV is topical, I thought I'd pose a question linked to that....

Who (His name) ordered the attack on Truk by the US?

NeoDeo1955
02-18-2007, 12:52 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
OK, Seeing as SHIV is topical, I thought I'd pose a question linked to that....

Who (His name) ordered the attack on Truk by the US?

Spruance.

Realjambo
02-18-2007, 01:11 AM
Spruance


Correct - Care to elaborate a little?

Realjambo
02-18-2007, 10:12 AM
NeoDeo, Do you have a new question to set? If not just shout and someone else will http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-18-2007, 10:46 AM
What USN ship sank 5 IJN subs in 8 days?

NeoDeo1955
02-19-2007, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by NeoDeo1955:
What USN ship sank 5 IJN subs in 8 days?


No one knows?

Hint: She was a DE.

Realjambo
02-20-2007, 04:29 PM
Shameless Bump! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-20-2007, 06:26 PM
Originally posted by NeoDeo1955:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by NeoDeo1955:
What USN ship sank 5 IJN subs in 8 days?


No one knows?

Hint: She was a DE. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Ok another hint:

She is named after an officer who died on the Oklahoma on December 7th 1941.

Realjambo
02-21-2007, 11:02 AM
No takers? Neodeo1955 you'll have to reveal the answer and educate us all. Sounds like one hell of a patrol for that Destroyer! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Minoos
02-21-2007, 12:14 PM
Could it be USS ENGLAND, DE-635?

Edit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_England_(DE-635)

During the next 8 days, she was to set an impressive record in anti-submarine warfare, never matched in World War II by any other American ship, as she hunted down and sank I-16 on 19 May, RO-106 on 22 May, RO-104 on 23 May, RO-116 on 24 May, and RO-108 on 26 May. In three of these cases, the other destroyer escorts were in on the beginning of the actions, but the kill in every case was England 's alone.

NeoDeo1955
02-21-2007, 04:18 PM
Originally posted by Minoos:
Could it be USS ENGLAND, DE-635?

Edit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_England_(DE-635)
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">During the next 8 days, she was to set an impressive record in anti-submarine warfare, never matched in World War II by any other American ship, as she hunted down and sank I-16 on 19 May, RO-106 on 22 May, RO-104 on 23 May, RO-116 on 24 May, and RO-108 on 26 May. In three of these cases, the other destroyer escorts were in on the beginning of the actions, but the kill in every case was England 's alone. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Yes that is correct! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/metal.gif

and 4 days later the England got partial credit for another sub aswell.

Your turn.

Minoos
02-22-2007, 08:46 AM
Sorry for being a bit long... Let's get back to the u-boat side.

Which kaleun was finally rehabilitated during the 1990s? In 1998, the city of Kiel honored his memory with a memorial and also renamed a street near the Kiel Canal were he was executed in 1944.

VikingGrandad
02-22-2007, 08:56 AM
You must be referring to Oblt. z.S. Oskar Kusch - condemned to death by a military tribunal for alleged "Wehrkraftzersetzung" (sedition and defeatism).

I had heard of this incident before, but didn't know about the street named after Kusch until I researched the answer. I'm glad to hear his name is now officially honoured.

Realjambo
02-22-2007, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
You must be referring to Oblt. z.S. Oskar Kusch - condemned to death by a military tribunal for alleged "Wehrkraftzersetzung" (sedition and defeatism).

That was quick! I think I was getting there, but you beat me to it!

Minoos
02-22-2007, 09:14 AM
VG this is a good answer...
Source for my question:
article_rust_kusch_uboat (http://www.ijnhonline.org/volume1_number1_Apr02/article_rust_kusch_uboat.doc.htm)

VikingGrandad
02-22-2007, 04:04 PM
Thanks Minoos.

I know I've said this before, but I think the answer to this question will be easy to find:

Which was the only WW2 U-boat to be sunk twice?

Kaleun1961
02-22-2007, 04:09 PM
Ooh, good question! I don't recall seeing this one before. Sorry that I don't have the time to research this, but good luck to those who do.

NeoDeo1955
02-22-2007, 11:46 PM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
Thanks Minoos.

I know I've said this before, but I think the answer to this question will be easy to find:

Which was the only WW2 U-boat to be sunk twice?

Does it start with a U? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

VikingGrandad
02-23-2007, 01:50 AM
Yes, you're definitely thinking along the right lines NeoDeo http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-23-2007, 11:10 PM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
Yes, you're definitely thinking along the right lines NeoDeo http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

U-31

Type VII A

Sunk in March of 1940 by the RAF. Raised and repaired the same month.

Lost for good NW of Ireland by depth charges from HMS Antelope in November of 1940.

The first time she sank all 58 of her crew died.

The second time 2 died and 44 survivedU-31

U-31 made the first convoy attack of WWII on the 16 of September 1939 when she sunk the steamer Aviemore.

VikingGrandad
02-24-2007, 05:47 AM
Yep, it was U-31.

After 10 enemy ships sunk, and the deployment of a mine which hit and damaged HMS Nelson, U-31 was bombed and sunk for the first time by an RAF Blenheim during dive trials in Wilhelmshaven harbour. All 48 crew were lost plus 10 shipyard workers who were also aboard.

Because the wreck lay in shallow waters, U-31 was able to be raised, and the dead bodies recovered and buried. The boat was repaired and was returned to service at the end of July 1940.

U-31 completed its first patrol with her new captain, Wilfred Prellberg, in September 1940, sinking 2 ships. During this patrol, U-31 was apparently attacked by an unknown enemy submarine, whose 2 torpedoes narrowly missed their target.

On her next and final patrol, she was again almost struck by enemy torpedoes - this time it was a British submarine in the waters near Lorient, 20 October 1940. 9 days later, U-31 sank the abandoned, drifting wreck of the 'Matina' - a banana boat that U-25 had torpedoed and shelled 3 days earlier. The crew of the 'Matina' had escaped into lifeboats, but none were ever seen again.

My reference says that U-31 was sunk for the second time NW of Iceland*, on the 2 November 1940 by HMS Antelope and a flying boat (presumably a Sunderland?). The 44 survivors were put into Allied captivity, 2 of whom died later in a failed attempt to escape.

My sources are 'U-boat im Focus' magazine, uboat.net and warsailors.com.

* 'U-boat im Focus' states Iceland, whereas uboat.bet and numerous other website state Ireland. Probably a typing error in the magazine http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif


We await your next question NeoDeo http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-24-2007, 09:20 AM
In the Movie "Operation Petticoat", a Pink submarine sinks a Japanese truck.

Truth, however, is stranger than fiction.

What US submarine did in a Japanese train?

Realjambo
02-25-2007, 04:52 AM
Operation Petticoat

Is this where a Torpedo ran up a beach and hit a train? Or am I remembering the actual film? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

EDIT: I think I've found it. Uss Barb?

The story is here. (http://www.homeofheroes.com/profiles/profiles_fluckey.html)

Realjambo
02-26-2007, 10:45 AM
Was I correct NeoDeo1955? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-26-2007, 01:47 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Was I correct NeoDeo1955? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Sorry. I went to a Wedding on Saturday and lets just say I over did it a wee bit.

Yes Realjambo It was the Barb.

Jury duty will be comming up soon so I think I will buy Thunder Below to have a good sub book to read while I am sitting around in the Jury pool room.

VikingGrandad
02-26-2007, 03:37 PM
@NeoDeo - I'm sure jury duty will give you an ideal opportunity to research more quiz questions for us http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

@RJ - we await your next question!

Realjambo
02-26-2007, 03:57 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/partyhat.gif I got it right!

But my comment about the scene where a torp runs up the beach and hits a train in that film remains - I'm still not sure.

Anyway, staying with the Barb for the next question. Meet it's Skipper - Eugene Bennett Fluckey:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/fluckeyussbarb.jpg

The Barb, under his command achieved something that was, at the time, unique - using just one salvo of Torpedoes.

Tell me what those Torpedoes did that was unique.

And there you were all thinking it was going to be a question about wether Irons were issued aboard USS subs - just look at his trousers - straight out the packet! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

NeoDeo1955
02-26-2007, 04:50 PM
It was a truck on the beach.

and the line from Grant was:

"WE SUNK A TRUCK!" http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

The torpedoes ran under the target and ran up on the beach to hit the truck. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Realjambo
02-28-2007, 01:29 AM
It was a truck on the beach.

and the line from Grant was:

"WE SUNK A TRUCK!" Big Grin

The torpedoes ran under the target and ran up on the beach to hit the truck. Big Grin


Ah! Yes! Thanks for that NeoDeo!

Anyone need a clue for the current question?

Realjambo
03-01-2007, 01:11 PM
*Bump!*

Minoos
03-01-2007, 01:30 PM
Mamkwan harbor raid?

http://hometown.aol.com/zeusprice/images/award%20letter.jpg

Realjambo
03-01-2007, 11:58 PM
The Barb, under his command achieved something that was, at the time, unique - using just one salvo of Torpedoes.

Tell me what those Torpedoes did that was unique.

Time to reveal the answer. This is taken from ClayBlair Jnrs' 'Combat Patrol' ISBN 0-553-12279-7 (I think - it's the only reference number I can find on or in the book)

September 17th 1944: "In one famous salvo - Nobody had ever done it before - Fluckey had sunk two ships, Unyo, 20,000t Carrier, and Azusa, 11,000t, the Tanker"

Minoos, I'll hand the baton to you, so to speak, seeing as you had a crack at the answer. I can't find any reference to your answer and what I have, but they may be the same or similar events just described differently.

Minoos
03-02-2007, 08:47 AM
If anyone has a question ready, please feel free to post.

geoffwessex
03-02-2007, 08:48 AM
Just an extra bit on the BARB - she did five ATLANTIC patrols (Oct 42 to July 43) before transferring to the Pacific, carrying out six patrols there, before a refit. Fitted with rocket launchers in 1945, for her last (12th) patrol she bombarded towns in Japan, and a railway. Given to Italy in 1954, eventually scrapped in 1972.

Some boat!

NeoDeo1955
03-02-2007, 01:43 PM
Originally posted by Minoos:
If anyone has a question ready, please feel free to post.

The First Battl of Savo Island led to a major disaster for Allied forces. Three American Cruisers and one Australian Cruiser had been sunk by the IJN in night action. The IJN lost no ships.

Some of the sting of this defeat was taken off however, from an American Submarine that attacked and sank one of the IJN Cruisers on their way back home.

What Sub was it.

Realjambo
03-04-2007, 02:35 PM
Might just be the weekend break, no takers so far - can you give us a clue NeoDeo?

geoffwessex
03-04-2007, 07:15 PM
How about S44?

ottoramsaig
03-05-2007, 08:32 AM
Originally posted by NeoDeo1955:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Minoos:
If anyone has a question ready, please feel free to post.

The First Battl of Savo Island led to a major disaster for Allied forces. Three American Cruisers and one Australian Cruiser had been sunk by the IJN in night action. The IJN lost no ships.

Some of the sting of this defeat was taken off however, from an American Submarine that attacked and sank one of the IJN Cruisers on their way back home.

What Sub was it. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>USS S-44 (SS-155)

NeoDeo1955
03-06-2007, 12:54 AM
Yes it was the S-44.

She sunk the Kako as she was returning to port from the First Battle of Savo.

Realjambo
03-07-2007, 03:37 AM
Good stuff. With an eye on the posting dates - Who has a new question? Let's keep the rolling quiz, er, rolling! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

mariuszj1939
03-07-2007, 04:02 AM
Some Polish submarines operated in Mediterrean Sea.
Tell name of two who used "Jelly Roger" flags during enter the ally ports ?

Realjambo
03-07-2007, 04:50 AM
Tell name of two who used "Jelly Roger" flags during enter the ally ports ?

Was it ORP's Dizik and Sokol?

I think this was the type of flag they had:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/dizikflagjpeg.jpg

KEY:
white stripes - sunk enemy merchant ships
red stripes - sunk enemy warships
red stars - gunfire combats
crossed sabres - boardings
dog - operation "Husky" (invasion on Sicily 1943)
greting - forced net barrier

mariuszj1939
03-07-2007, 04:57 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Tell name of two who used "Jelly Roger" flags during enter the ally ports ?

Was it ORP's Dizik and Sokol?

I think this was the type of flag they had:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/dizikflagjpeg.jpg

KEY:
white stripes - sunk enemy merchant ships
red stripes - sunk enemy warships
red stars - gunfire combats
crossed sabres - boardings
dog - operation "Husky" (invasion on Sicily 1943)
greting - forced net barrier </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Excellent RJ http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
12 points goes to UK http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
03-07-2007, 05:34 AM
Thanks Mariuszj!

Next question. Back to U-Boats. Many had an insignia painted on the conning tower, in fact, U-boats that didn't were considered odd.

What was the relevance of the 5 Olympic Rings on U-20 and U-23's conning towers?

I've googled for a photo but with no luck I'm afraid.

mariuszj1939
03-07-2007, 05:39 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Thanks Mariuszj!

Next question. Back to U-Boats. Many had an insignia painted on the conning tower, in fact, U-boats that didn't were considered odd.

What was the relevance of the 5 Olympic Rings on U-20 and U-23's conning towers?

I've googled for a photo but with no luck I'm afraid.

The Olympic Rings on U 20 and U 23 indicated that the commander of the boat had graduated in 1936. This was in reference to the Olympic Games held in Germany in 1936.

Realjambo
03-07-2007, 05:58 AM
Well done Mariuszj! That took just 5 minutes! I'll have to post harder questions!

Over to you http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

NeoDeo1955
03-08-2007, 03:03 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Well done Mariuszj! That took just 5 minutes! I'll have to post harder questions!

Over to you http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

No new questions? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sadeyes.gif

Realjambo
03-09-2007, 10:08 AM
Do you have one Neo Deo? Perhaps Mariuszj is busy.

Realjambo
03-10-2007, 01:07 AM
*Bump!*

NeoDeo1955
03-10-2007, 02:02 AM
What U S submarine was the only boat to be powered by the wind?

Realjambo
03-10-2007, 09:29 AM
What U S submarine was the only boat to be powered by the wind?


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif In the era of WW2 NeoDeo? That's a tough one! I assume the wind power was only a temporary measure? You have me stumped.

geoffwessex
03-10-2007, 10:00 AM
Tricky! Especially as all USN submarines have 'sails'.

NeoDeo1955
03-10-2007, 10:51 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">What U S submarine was the only boat to be powered by the wind?


http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif In the era of WW2 NeoDeo? That's a tough one! I assume the wind power was only a temporary measure? You have me stumped. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Oops!

My bad.

While the boat was a member of the fleet until 1945, the incident took place between wars.

If that is a no no, I will withdraw the question.

Sorry for any confusion.

Realjambo
03-10-2007, 10:59 AM
If that is a no no, I will withdraw the question

No carry on, I'm intrigued.

Messervy
03-10-2007, 11:13 AM
USS R-14

http://www.rddesigns.com/subs/undersail.jpg


SUBMARINE 5 DAYS DISABLED REACHES HILO

With Fuel Exhausted Diver Rigged Sails From Mattresses and Canvas.


Rigged out with jurymasts built of steel bunk rods and(missing text) sails made out of Mattre (missing text) and canvas hammocks (missing text) Submarine (missing text) arrived at Hilo yesterday afternoon out of oil but still with electrical power in her storage batteries. As a cross between a three masted windjammer and an undersea boat she made a weird appearance.

The R-14 was one of a flotilla of submarines sent out to search for the missing navy tug Conestoga, long overdue here from San Diego and virually given up for lost. In turn she herself has been on the missing list for the last five days.


Reserve Tanks Empty

On the night of May 10 in lat. 18 north, logitude 153.33 her fuel oil gave out it was found out that the reserve tanks when called on were empty. Lieut. A. D. Douglas, in command, sent out a general wireless call, which Rear Admiral Shoemaker, commandant of the Pearl Harbor Naval station, said today had been received by the R-12 and relayed to Pearl Harbor. But no answer was ever recieved by the R-14. Lieutenant Douglas today told the Star-Bulletin's correspondent at Hilo that he was unable to account forthe reserve fuel tank being empty and could not understand why his call for help had not been answered. The sub carried 10,000 gallons of fuel when she left Pearl Harbor.

Not knowing whether his call for help had been heard or not the commander of the helpless submarine rigged two jurymasts and with thtier aid and that of trhe wireless mast managed to spread enough canvas to make headway toward land. On the slow voyage to Hilo he sighted the Matson liner Enterprise and mistook her for a SHIPOP bringing succor, but no other vessels were seen.


Food Supply Low


Within five miles of Hilo the storage batteries were switched on and the R-14 rounded the breakwater and came into port on her own power. She had left only suficient rice and bully beef to last her crew of 27 men and two officers four days more.

This morning the R-12 also arrived at Hilo to give the R-14 fuel. Informed by the Star-Bulletin this morning that the R-14 was at Hilo, Rear Adimeral Shoemaker said he had been expecting news of her arrival there at any moment. No anxiety had been felt, he said, because from her reported position it was evident that she would have enough power left in her storage batteries to make Hilo. The power he supposed, had been held in reserve in case the vessel got into difficulties on a lee shore and needed it to work into safe water again. Why the reserve tank was empty he did not know.

Article courtesy of Robert Suess son of Ray Suess

NeoDeo1955
03-10-2007, 11:26 AM
Wow!

Correct.

The R-14

And you posted the picture too!

Messervy,

I turn it over to you.

Nice article and nice job.

Messervy
03-10-2007, 11:48 AM
Thanks...google rules!

This shouldn`t be too difficult.

I`m asking you to name at least one submarine which served in each navy of the three axis powers.

NeoDeo1955
03-11-2007, 11:18 AM
Holy Axis triple threat!

I don't have a clue so this is a shameles bump.

PS.

Thought I would save Real the trouble. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

VikingGrandad
03-11-2007, 12:02 PM
The only one I know of is the Italian submarine 'Comandante Capellini'. She was taken over by the Germans, following the Italian surrender and re-named UIT-24.

UIT-24 was taken over by Japan and recommissioned as I-503 or I-505 on 10 May, 1945. The boat was in Kobe at the time of the Japanese surrender. Scuttled at Kii Suido on 16 April, 1946 by the US Navy.

geoffwessex
03-11-2007, 12:13 PM
Well, there were two boats, but......

First there were five. Many Italian boats were seized by Germany when Italy surrendered: Cappellini (became UIT-24), Giuliani (UIT-23), Torelli (UIT-25), Finzi (UIT-21) and Bagnolini (UIT-22). They were to become transport boats between Europe and Japan.

Two of them were at Bordeaux - one (UIT-21) was scuttled because of too many defects, and the other (UIT-22) tried to make it around South Africa but, to cut a long story short) was sunk by British catalinas off Capetown.

Of the other three, they made it to Singapore in 1944 (still as German boats) but UIT-23 got sunk by British submarine Tally-Ho Feb 44.

Then there were two. They attempted a return trip to Germany, with raw materials, but the re-supply chain was sunk, so both boats were stranded. They were put to use by the Japanese (still as German boats with the Italian crews) in ferrying jobs around the East.

In May 45, Germany surrendered, and the Japanese took over the boats and re-named them - UIT-24 (ex-Cappellini) became I-503 and UIT-25 (ex-Torelli) became I-504.

You could aso add that they eventually had four owners, as the Americans took them over when Japan surrendered and kept them for around eit\ght months before scuttling them.

So there ya go - the short answer is....

Cappellini and Torelli.

Buongiorno, Auf wedersehen, sayonara. And 'have a nice day'.

Messervy
03-11-2007, 12:32 PM
Mhmmm....what to do now. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_confused.gif

I asked to name at least one and VG seems to beat geofwessex by 11 minutes.

I guess geoff spent them elaborating his answer. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

Congratulations to both of you.

VikingGrandad
03-11-2007, 12:41 PM
@ Geoffwessex - your answer was at least twice as good as mine, so I'm happy for you to take the honour of posing the next question http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Realjambo
03-11-2007, 01:21 PM
@ Geoffwessex - your answer was at least twice as good as mine, so I'm happy for you to take the honour of posing the next question Smile

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

geoffwessex
03-11-2007, 04:26 PM
Oh! Clearly a Forum of Gentlemen! (not forgetting the ladies).

Well, this was a quick question that wouldn't take long, so I added a couple of fairly easy supplementaries.....

Who was the Kaleun that sunk a British Submarine Depot Ship in the Eastern Mediterranean (1942), where was his boat based, and what eventually happened to him?

VikingGrandad
03-11-2007, 06:00 PM
Was it Heinz-Joachim Neuman's U-372 which sank HMS Medway off the coast of Alexandria on 20th June 1942? HMS Medway was assisting in the evacuation of troops from Alexandria, accompanied by eight destroyers, and was headed for Haifa when U-372 attacked.

U-372 was based at La Spezia at the time (29th Flotilla).

U-372 was sunk on 4 Aug, 1942 in the Mediterranean, south-west of Haifa. Neuman and his crew were captured and became POW's for the rest of the war.

geoffwessex
03-11-2007, 07:26 PM
Absolutely right, VG, of course. That would be the 'staff answer'.

Over to you....

VikingGrandad
03-12-2007, 06:23 PM
Thanks Geoff. I'll get a new question sorted for tomorrow http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

NeoDeo1955
03-13-2007, 11:22 PM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
Thanks Geoff. I'll get a new question sorted for tomorrow http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Mr. Grandad did you come up with a new question yet?

VikingGrandad
03-14-2007, 08:55 AM
Sorry, I didn't get time to research a question last night...

Here's one:

A German ship (ex-British) was mistakenly sunk by a U-boat in March 1943. What was the name of the ship and the number of the U-boat that sank it?

Messervy
03-14-2007, 11:59 AM
http://www.uboat.net/allies/ships/photos/dt/doggerbank.jpg

Doggerbank - sunk on March,3 1943

Built as British Speybank for Andrew Weir & Co, London
On 31 Jan, 1941 captured by the German auxiliary cruiser Atlantis in the Indian Ocean. A prize crew brought the ship to Bordeaux. Taken over by the Kriegsmarine, renamed Doggerbank (Schiff 53) and converted to auxiliary minelayer. Laid mines off South Africa and proceeded to Japan.

The Doggerbank was returning as blockade-runner from Japan.
At 21.53 hours on 3 Mar, 1943, U-43 torpedoed a steamer of the Dunedin Star type, but it was soon clear the she had sunk the Doggerbank, which was ahead of her sheduled arrival and was sunk in error. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Realjambo
03-14-2007, 02:39 PM
Good answer Messervy! I like the fact you took the trouble to find and post a pic too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

VikingGrandad
03-14-2007, 06:44 PM
Messervy's comprehensive answer is correct! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Doggerbank was the last ship to be sunk by U-43 (one of Wolfgang Lüth's former boats) and her last commander, Hans-Joachim Schwantke. A few months later U-43 was attacked by an Avenger aircraft which sunk the U-boat with a Fido homing torpedo. Schwantke and the entire crew were lost.

Over to you Messervy...

Messervy
03-15-2007, 03:05 AM
Thanks lads!

Ahhh....surely there is someone else who wants to post a question.
My mind at the moment is preoccupied by some other things, so this is more of a "punnishment" at the moment.

Realjambo
03-15-2007, 03:24 AM
This is USS Guardfish, of the Gato class.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/ss_uss_guardfish_ss-217.jpg

Lt. Cmdr T.B. Klakring achieved a spectacular sinking of a freighter anchored inside a harbour with this Sub, on September 4th of a particular year in WW2 contributing to Klakring earning a Navy Cross, and the title holder of a feat never beaten in WW2 in the Submarine war.

Which year and what was so special about the sinking?

mariuszj1939
03-15-2007, 06:26 AM
USS Guardfish

1942 - passenger cargo ship Tenyu Maru
/attacked Japanese port/

Is it the right answer ?

Realjambo
03-15-2007, 06:44 AM
@ Mariusj

Almost there! It was 1942, and the ship is correct. I 'm looking for what was so special about the sinking.

Perhaps I should re-phrase it slightly:
What was so special, a feat never equalled or beaten in fact, about how the USS grayling engaged the target?

mariuszj1939
03-15-2007, 07:19 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
@ Mariusj

Almost there! It was 1942, and the ship is correct. I 'm looking for what was so special about the sinking.

Perhaps I should re-phrase it slightly:
What was so special, a feat never equalled or beaten in fact, about how the USS grayling engaged the target?

I hope I know :
she left from attacked convoy on 2nd Sept and retreated into the harbor and anchored,
but very long-range shot from GUARDFISH finished her.

Realjambo
03-15-2007, 07:34 AM
but very long-range shot from GUARDFISH finished her


Your persistence paid off Mariuszj! I'll give you that.

The range of the shot was 7,500 yards! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif the longest successful shot of the war that resulted in a sinking.

Over to you.

(Source: Combat Patrol by Clay Blair Jnr ISBN 0-553-12279-7)

mariuszj1939
03-15-2007, 07:54 AM
That question is rather for marine fan (than submarine) but still interesting ...

One of Polish destoyers took part, along with the British destroyers in the pursuit of the Bismark.

Tell me :
- name of destroyer (it's easy)?
- what Captain's done before commencing fire on Bismark ? (that's interesting) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

geoffwessex
03-15-2007, 05:54 PM
Originally commissioned into the Royal Navy as HMS Nerissa, ORP PIORUN was transferred to the Polish Navy as a replacement for the destroyer ORP Grom.

She was based in Great Britain and was commanded by Commander Plawski.

On 13th-15th March 1941, she took part in the defence of Clydebank against Luftwaffe air raids, as she happened to be undergoing repairs in John Brown's shipyard. Many people remembered that she put up a terrific barrage on the first night, which may have caused the shipyard to get off comparatively lightly. A memorial to the crew of the ship was later erected in Clydebank.

In May 1941 she was escorting convoy WS-8B, along with four Royal Navy destroyers, when they were ordered to leave the convoy to take part in the pursuit of the German Battleship Bismarck. Piorun took part, along with the British destroyers, in the shadowing of and torpedo attacks on the Bismarck the night before she was sunk, and at one point they had an exchange of fire for half an hour. Cdr Plawski transmitted the message "I am a Pole" before commencing fire on the Bismarck.

mariuszj1939
03-16-2007, 01:31 AM
Originally posted by geoffwessex:
Originally commissioned into the Royal Navy as HMS Nerissa, ORP PIORUN was transferred to the Polish Navy as a replacement for the destroyer ORP Grom.

Cdr Plawski transmitted the message "I am a Pole" before commencing fire on the Bismarck.


Excellent geoffwessex ! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif
Your answer was perfert with all details http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

(I just finished book written by Commander Pławski)
http://www.kkkk.pl/ksiazki/images/okladki/duze/83-917883-1-8.jpg


Over to you !

geoffwessex
03-16-2007, 09:15 AM
Right....

Many old US warships and submarines were taken up on loan by Britain, and several of these, and other newly-built craft, were then lent to other 'free' navies, like the French, Norwegian, Polish, Dutch, Greek.

One 'loan' submarine was sunk by a 'loan' warship. Both were built in US yards around twenty years earlier.

Which submarine, which destroyer?

NeoDeo1955
03-16-2007, 12:30 PM
S-25 was laid down on 26 October 1918 by the Fore River Shipbuilding Corporation in Quincy, Massachusetts. She was launched on 29 May 1922.

S-25 was decommissioned on 4 November 1941 and simultaneously transferred to Great Britain where she was renamed HMS P551. She was then loaned to the government of Poland in exile, accepted by Lieutenant Commander B. Romanowski of the Polish Navy, and commissioned as ORP Jastrząb.

And

The first USS Thomas (DD–182) was a Wickes class destroyer in the United States Navy following World War I. She was later transferred to the Royal Navy as HMS St Albans (I-15), as a Town class destroyer. She was launched on the Fourth of July 1918

While traveling in an Allied convoy near Norway, Jastrzab strayed some 100 miles (160 km) off her proper course, and on 2 May 1942 was sunk by the destroyer HMS St. Albans (ex-USS Thomas) and the minesweeper HMS Seagull.

geoffwessex
03-16-2007, 03:10 PM
Excellent NeoDeo - only extra thing was that St Albans was, by that time, crewed by Norwegians and called "KNM" St Albans.

Old St Albans ....
http://home.cogeco.ca/~gchalcraft/stalbans.jpg

and the current St Albans is a Type23 frigate.... Video here (http://www.royal-navy.mod.uk/img/navy/ConMediaFile/videoSelect.php?id=14256)


A NeoDeo question?

NeoDeo1955
03-16-2007, 06:05 PM
What was the first U S sub to have airconditioning?

Realjambo
03-17-2007, 01:15 AM
Sorry to interupt gentlemen, but now the forums have been split, I'm looking for opinions on wether you would like a seperate Rolling Quiz in the SH4 forum to concentrate solely on the Pacific war theatre. The quiz here would then concentrate only on the Atlantic war.

I know some Kaleuns don't intend to become Skippers, so perhaps two quiz's will satisfy everyone?

Let me know your thoughts http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

NeoDeo1955
03-17-2007, 10:23 AM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
Sorry to interupt gentlemen, but now the forums have been split, I'm looking for opinions on wether you would like a seperate Rolling Quiz in the SH4 forum to concentrate solely on the Pacific war theatre. The quiz here would then concentrate only on the Atlantic war.

I know some Kaleuns don't intend to become Skippers, so perhaps two quiz's will satisfy everyone?

Let me know your thoughts http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

I very much enjoyed the U boat questions since I am a big Fleet boat fan I have gained alot from the questions. I do not think it would hurt very much to break them apart tho. After all you would just have to press a few more buttons if you wanted to read both threads. Which I intend to do. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Realjambo
03-17-2007, 04:59 PM
OK my fellow Kaleuns, in the SH4 forum I've started a 'Pacific' themed Rolling Quiz, so by default this Rolling Quiz should now only be based on the U-Boat / Atlantic theatre of war.

You are of course more than welcome to flit between the two quiz's. Let me just say I'm very pleased with the take up on the quiz and it is testament to you good people that it lives up to it's name of the 'Rolling Quiz'! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Enough distractions from me, back to the quiz. NeoDeo - a question from you sir if you will...

geoffwessex
03-17-2007, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by Realjambo:
OK my fellow Kaleuns, in the SH4 forum I've started a 'Pacific' themed Rolling Quiz, so by default this Rolling Quiz should now only be based on the U-Boat / Atlantic theatre of war.


Although, of course, there were times when those two areas overlapped....

frinstance.... the UIT23 and UIT24 that we covered on here last week, and then there's HMS/M Terrapin - damaged 19-May-45, by depth charges from Japanese escort vessels, while attacking escorted tanker west of Batavia, in the Java Sea. Terrapin escaped and returned to Fremantle, shepherded by US submarine Cavalla (http://www.cavalla.org/). Then there's the sinking of the Japanese cruiser Ashigara by HMS/M Trenchant, 1945, the XE Craft raids on Singapore, etc. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

NeoDeo1955
03-17-2007, 10:59 PM
What U Boat was the first U boat to be done in by a friendly?

NeoDeo1955
03-19-2007, 12:30 PM
Originally posted by NeoDeo1955:
What U Boat was the first U boat to be done in by a friendly?

Should I give the answer or does someone want to take a crack at it?

Realjambo
03-19-2007, 02:31 PM
Should I give the answer or does someone want to take a crack at it?

Well it's got me beat. I can find answers about Uboats probably sunk by their own torpedo's, but not a Uboat sunk by what I guess we'd call a 'blue on blue' in this day and age.

Anyone?

geoffwessex
03-19-2007, 02:40 PM
The Type IIB U-15 sank on 30 January 1940 in the North Sea at Hoofden, after being rammed in error by the German torpedo boat Iltis. 25 dead (all hands lost). Would that be it?

NeoDeo1955
03-19-2007, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by geoffwessex:
The Type IIB U-15 sank on 30 January 1940 in the North Sea at Hoofden, after being rammed in error by the German torpedo boat Iltis. 25 dead (all hands lost). Would that be it?

Correct!

Your turn.

geoffwessex
03-19-2007, 09:26 PM
OK - I'll think of something tomorrow - it's a bit late now (2330 here)

NeoDeo1955
03-20-2007, 09:59 AM
Originally posted by geoffwessex:
OK - I'll think of something tomorrow - it's a bit late now (2330 here)

Members of this forum sleep? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Do do time! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/sleepzzz.gif

geoffwessex
03-20-2007, 12:02 PM
OK - I tried earlier but the Forum was playing up.

We see many reports of 'patrols' in SH3 where the players have sunk this and that Battleship/Carrier, three Rodneys, six Fijis etc. In real life, only four 'big' warships were sunk by U-Boats: Two Aircraft Carriers and two Battleships (and three of those were very old).

So, a big question this time - something to get the books out for....

Please name all of the four U=Boats - AND their Kaleuns - that sunk those four big ships.

Realjambo
03-21-2007, 02:17 AM
Good one geoffwessex http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

*RJ scuttles off to Great Library at Jambo Towers*

Ok I think...

HMS COURAGEOUS - U29 - Schuhart, September 17th 1939

HMS ROYAL OAK - U47 - Prien, Oct 14th 1939

HMS ARK ROYAL - U81 - Guggenberger, Nov 14th 1941

HMS EAGLE - U73 - Rosenbaum, August 11th 1942

I even had portrait photo's of each Kaleun for you but Photobucket seems to be down http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

VikingGrandad
03-21-2007, 04:38 AM
What about HMS Barham? (Queen Elizabeth Class Battleship) She was sunk on the 25th November 1941 by U-331, commanded by Hans-Dietrich von Tiesenhausen.

Not quite in the same league, but still classed as capital warships:

- HMS Audacity (escort carrier) was sunk on 21st December 1941 by U-751 under Gerhard Bigalk.

- HMS Avenger (escort carrier) was sunk on 15th November 1942 by U-155 under Adolf Pienin.

geoffwessex
03-21-2007, 07:58 AM
Oh dear! That's my credibility up the swanny!
I'd forgotten about the Eagle (another ancient ship).

I'd been thinking Royal Oak, Barham, Courageous and Ark Royal. I think RJ deserves the credit though, as Eagle replaces Barham neatly.

Interesting that four out of the five were sunk in the Mediterranean. As tough as the Atlantic was for the U-Boats, the Mediterranean must have been harder, as those convoys to Malta were given such big escort forces.

I did see once that of all the U-Boats that entered the Med, none come out again.

Anyway, sorry about that. Over to RJ - unless VG wants it!

Realjambo
03-21-2007, 08:33 AM
Thanks geoffwessex - well done to VG for those additional suggestions.

My next question:

A Norwegian steamer and a British steamer were the last vessels sunk by a U-Boat torpedo in WW2, in the North Sea on 7th May 1945. The war in Europe ended less than an hour later - But which U-Boat was it and who was the Kaleun? (Bonus points for the vessels names!)

geoffwessex
03-22-2007, 02:15 PM
The ships were :

In convoy EN-91 (but possibly EN-591) from Methil, Fife, Scotland, via Loch Ewe to Oban, on the West Scottish Coast, via Pentland Firth (i.e. "around the top"). Two ships were sunk in the approaches to the Firth of Forth, near May Island.

Avondale Park, 2878 tons, (Canadian but with British crew)
http://home.cogeco.ca/~gchalcraft/park.jpg

Sneland I, 1791 tons, Norwegian

Both sunk by the TypeXXIII U-2336, commanded by KptLt. Emil Klusmeier.

These sinkings happened 3 days after Dönitz had given the U-boats the order to stop all enemy action and return to port. Klusmeier later claimed he didn't know anything about the order to surrender. (The attack took place after the German surrender documents had been signed, but before the time of their effect at midnight on the 7th). The Type XXIIIs could remain dived for long periods, but I don't believe it didn't come up at night for signals.

Realjambo
03-22-2007, 06:11 PM
Correct geoffwessex! and a bonus point for your detailed explanation and photo's too! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

We await your next question....

geoffwessex
03-22-2007, 07:00 PM
What was "Tarnmatte" ?

Realjambo
03-23-2007, 01:32 AM
....was a radar absorbing material used to coat snorkel heads to shield them from allied radar. It consisted of a compound of synthetic rubber and iron oxide and was claimed to have 90 percent effectiveness in reducing radar signature.

Realjambo
03-23-2007, 03:55 AM
I'll throw this open to anyone who has a question, as I don't have one to hand off the top of my head....

geoffwessex
03-23-2007, 06:20 AM
Yes RJ - quite right. The forerunner of Radar Absorbent Material (RAM) used on all kinds of warships and aircraft nowadays.

Similar subject, Anechoic coatings.....

The modern submarine wouldn't leave base without a new set of tiles (the glue seems to be a problem sometimes, as you see a lot missing after a boat's been at sea a long time)

Like a new bathroom...

http://home.cogeco.ca/~gchalcraft/sm/images/acoustictiles.jpg

Realjambo
03-24-2007, 05:26 PM
Open to anyone who has a question to post...

Realjambo
03-27-2007, 01:25 PM
*Bump*

Any takers? I'll post one in a few hours time if not.

Realjambo
03-28-2007, 02:43 AM
Looking at the Allied air threat to U-Boats, one aircraft in particular was nicknamed 'Mude Bienen' by U-Boat crews, meaning 'Tired Bee'

What aircraft was it?

geoffwessex
03-28-2007, 01:07 PM
I'm biting my tongue and holding back for somebody else to have a go.... and giving this a "bump"

Realjambo
03-28-2007, 01:33 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

VikingGrandad
03-28-2007, 01:37 PM
Oh... I thought I'd already posted an answer whilst I was at work... I must have forgotten to submit the post http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

The bee reference immediately made me think of the sound effect of the Sunderland in SH3 - like the down-tuned droning sound of a big bee!? Some websites I found seemed to confirm this http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Realjambo
03-28-2007, 01:45 PM
Indeed it was VG. Geoffwessex I suspect you had that answer too.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/sund2.jpg

geoffwessex
03-28-2007, 02:33 PM
Yes - the Sunderland - I have to admit I just put "Mude Bienen" into Google and it was the top result. I Googled for some pictures of it and there are some very nice ones around, and one ugly post-war one (presumably modded for the Korean War). Here....
http://home.cogeco.ca/~gchalcraft/sunderlandmod.jpg

The extra good thing about this thread is that it leads to reading up on the subjects a little more. I'm going to check on the Sunderlands and see where they operated from. I know they operated a little in Poole Harbour, but must have also been around Devon/Cornwall to get to the Biscay faster (and spend more time on patrol).

VG's go!

VikingGrandad
03-28-2007, 07:37 PM
I think this will be easy:

What unique opportunity was offered to artist Claus Bergen in WW1 and Lothar-Günther Buchheim in WW2?

Realjambo
03-30-2007, 03:09 AM
* Bump! *

VikingGrandad
03-30-2007, 03:48 PM
Originally posted by VikingGrandad:
I think this will be easy:

What unique opportunity was offered to artist Claus Bergen in WW1 and Lothar-Günther Buchheim in WW2?

No answers yet.... hmmmm... surely anyone who has read/watched 'Das Boot' could make an educated guess? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Realjambo
03-30-2007, 03:54 PM
I was holding back VG, but will punt..They sailed as 'invited observers' ?

VikingGrandad
03-30-2007, 04:08 PM
That's correct RJ... Now, I wonder if someone can provide the names of the U-boats and captains they sailed with?

BatleshipHunter
04-01-2007, 04:28 PM
I belive Bergen was aboard U-53.


I know Buchheim joined Lieutenant-Commander Heinrich Lehmann-Willenbrock and the crew of U-96 for a single patrol.


I am just going by memory, maby someone can corret me if I am wrong?

VikingGrandad
04-02-2007, 10:39 AM
Well done BattleshipHunter http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

The Buchheim details are of course correct, and Claus Bergen did indeed join the crew of U-53 (a Type U 51 Mittel-U class), and her captain, Hans Rose.

Like Buchheim, Bergen was fortunate enough to accompany one of the war's U-boat aces. Rose sank 84 ships (213,900 tons) during his command of U-53. Amongst the ships sunk during Bergen's patrol, Rose sank the 10,402 ton liner 'Ultonia' (fortunately, all but one passengers/crew survived). Bergen painted the scene of 'Ultonia' slipping stern-first beneath the waves.

Bergen's story of his trip is featured, amongst other, in the wonderful book 'U-boat Stories of the Great War', which also features many of his stunning paintings (sadly, only black and white versions).

My references: 'U-boat Stories - Narratives of German U-boat Sailors' by Karl Neureuther and Claus Bergen, uboat.net, http://www.uk-muenchen.de/english/eng_bergen.htm and http://www.theshipslist.com/ships/descriptions/ShipsT-U.html

I think the next question should be yours, BattleshipHunter (I'm sure RJ won't mind http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif)

BatleshipHunter
04-02-2007, 04:00 PM
Ok, here is my question, what is a "Mousetrap"

Realjambo
04-04-2007, 11:53 AM
*BUMP!*

geoffwessex
04-04-2007, 12:49 PM
MOUSETRAP:

Either a trap for mice, OR....

A rocket-launched Depth Charge system, fitted to USN ships.

This weapon was originally classified as a Rocket Launcher and retained its original Mark number when reclassified as an ASW projector. This weapon was intended to take the place of Hedgehog on smaller ships. An 85 lbs. (39 kg) warhead was originally fitted, but this was too heavy to man-handle in rough seas. The warhead was changed to that of the Hedgehog. Compared to Hedgehog, this weapon was rocket propelled rather than a spigot mortar, i.e., the propellant burned more slowly. Usually fitted in pairs and could not be compensated for rolling. Used by the Soviet Navy under lend lease. (www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WAMRussian_ASW.htm)

BatleshipHunter
04-04-2007, 02:17 PM
Geoff, you are right in every aspect of your post. These systems were built for smaller ships. The Mousetrap was to designed to forward fire 8 contact bombs by means of rockets, which had no recoil.

VikingGrandad
04-05-2007, 06:44 AM
We await your next question Geoff! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

geoffwessex
04-05-2007, 01:06 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/1072.gif Sorry - been a bit busy - I'll try in a few hours.

geoffwessex
04-05-2007, 08:24 PM
Right.... "Enigma"

We all know a little about the Enigma machine, because one is sitting in the wireless office of the submarines in SH3. The settings for these machines, or their rotors, was laid down in codebooks, and taken to sea with the boat. One was captured from a U-Boat.

Two part question:

1. Which U-Boat and which ship was in control of its capture?

2. What was special about the codebooks?


[Edit} Just to clarify, I mean the codebooks on ALL the U-Boats, not just the one captured.

Realjambo
04-08-2007, 10:27 AM
*BUMP!* http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

geoffwessex
04-08-2007, 11:37 AM
Just as a footnote to the Enigma question....

A follow-on bit of kit derived from the Enigma (which had been around since at least the early 1930s) was still in use in NATO navies up until 1983 (if memory serves me correctly). It was called the KL-7, and the 'system' was called 'Adonis'. See this link (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KL-7)

There were some extras available which allowed it to encode/decode teletype punched paper tape, but generally it was in use wherever there were no means of 'online' encryption (i.e. encode/decode actually during transmission/reception). Older ships and submarines (particularly the small ships), had to stick with Morse circuits (mainly for ship to shore communications) right up until the early 1970s, though online-coded teletype broadcasts from shore had become the norm. Very slow in relation to what we get from the internet, at 50 or 75 bauds = 50 or 75 bits per second - a 56kbps modem runs 1000+ times faster. You could expect that perhaps 4 short signals from shore could take 8 to 10 minutes to receive - but still much faster than a Morse broadcast, even run at high-speed, recorded and then slowed down to a readable speed. Then there's the time required for decoding Morse 'traffic'.

Realjambo
04-12-2007, 03:33 PM
Come on people! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/crackwhip.gif

Geoffwessex kindly reveal your answer, and another question should you have one. If not, it goes open to anyone with a question to pose.

VikingGrandad
04-12-2007, 04:50 PM
I think I have the answers! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

1. Which U-Boat and which ship was in control of its capture?

Lemp's U-110 was the first captured U-boat from which an Enigma machine and codebooks were recovered by the crew of the Royal Navy destroyer 'HMS Bulldog', 9th May 1941. Enigma machine rotors has been previously captured from U-33 (12th February 1940). Codebooks were recovered by the Royal Navy from U-559 (30th October 1942) and by the US Navy from U-505 (4th June 1944). I read somewhere that Kriegsmarine Enigma codebooks and/or rotors were also captured from German weather ships and supply ships.


2. What was special about the codebooks?

They were printed in red, water-soluble ink.

geoffwessex
04-12-2007, 09:51 PM
Exactly correct, VG! Over to you....

Realjambo
04-15-2007, 09:19 AM
VG, shout if you don't have a question and we'll open it up for everyone else.

VikingGrandad
04-15-2007, 01:03 PM
Sorry for the delay http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blush.gif

Here's a new question:

The Kriegsmarine High Command's written guidelines for U-boat Commanders contained many best-practice procedures. According to the guidelines, what was the Commander intended to do after an initial, successful surface torpedo attack on a convoy, at night?

Specifically:

<LI>Which direction to manoeuvre the U-boat, relative to the direction of the convoy?
<LI>Submerged or surfaced?
<LI>What speed?

geoffwessex
04-15-2007, 08:19 PM
Great question!

I think a Uboat was meant to try to attack from one side of a convoy, go deep and cross to the other side at top speed and attack again. My 'logic' here is that an escort would find it difficult and dangerous to cut through the convoy to give chase.

VikingGrandad
04-16-2007, 12:58 PM
Not a bad answer Geoff, but it's not the one I have in my source material...

The bit about attacking from the side is of course right.

The subsequent manoeuvre I'm referring to is very much in line with the "Be more aggressive" message we sometimes get from BdU in SH3 http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

VikingGrandad
04-16-2007, 12:59 PM
Hint - the submerged or surfaced aspect depends on whether the commander believes he has been sighted or not.

So what about the speed and direction?

Messervy
04-17-2007, 01:58 AM
Get into the convoy, between the lines and sail with it?

VikingGrandad
04-17-2007, 06:26 AM
Nope, not according to the manual Messervy...

Although we know some of the aces did that.

Poseidon_142
04-17-2007, 11:33 AM
Could it be that the u-boot attacked form abeam and then went ahead flank to the head of the convoy and attacked from there again on the surface

Kaleun1961
04-17-2007, 06:03 PM
I'm guessing they were told to withdraw, on the surface if possible, and do an end-around out of sight beyond the visible horizon and come in again on the same side.

Realjambo
04-19-2007, 04:50 PM
*Bump!* http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/crackwhip.gif

Kaleun1961
04-20-2007, 02:28 PM
Time for the answer.

VikingGrandad
04-20-2007, 02:53 PM
Sorry my answer is overdue...

My question referred specifically to points 237-239:

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c188/VikingG/Scan1.gif

Scanned from 'The U-boat Commander's Handbook', Kriegsmarine High Command.

As you can see, the commander was encouraged to manouevre away and ahead of the convoy for a subsequent attack. What struck me was the instruction to run at full speed submerged if pursued, because the explosions from the attack would confuse the escort's sound locating devices. This makes sense, but I'm fairly certain that this doesn't apply in SH3.

Good to see plenty of well reasoned answers. I can't decide if K61 or Poseidon's answer is closest, so I guess whoever posts a question first!

Kaleun1961
04-20-2007, 06:14 PM
Poseidon can have the honour, if he wishes. I've had plenty of kicks at the can.

VikingGrandad
04-22-2007, 02:24 PM
BUMP - Poseidon, do you have a question?

K61, maybe you would like to post one if Poseidon doesn't show up for a while?

Kaleun1961
04-22-2007, 02:49 PM
I'll get to work on a question for posting later this afternoon. If he posts first, fine, if not then I'll do it.

Kaleun1961
04-22-2007, 03:01 PM
Alright, this is not a U-boat related question, but a submarine does factor into the answer:

"What was the name of the American naval aviator who was shot down on September 2, 1944? He was rescued by a submarine and resumed his flying career, for a total of 58 combat missions and 1228 combat flight hours. What was the name of the submarine that rescued him?"

"Bonus point" if you can also name the ship from which he operated.

So, we need two things: the name of the aviator and the name of the submarine which rescued him.

Hint: He is still alive.

geoffwessex
04-22-2007, 07:59 PM
Would that be George Bush (Snr)? He was a Lt(JG) flying from USS San Jacinto in an Avenger, Sept 44, attacking some Japanese installations. Shot down, he was the only survivor of the three crewmen. He was picked up by USS Finback.

Reference (http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq10-1.htm)

Poseidon_142
04-23-2007, 09:54 AM
sorry guys was away for a bit and was ot able to look at the forums so I am sorry about that but no worries

@K61
Thanks for taking the question

Kaleun1961
04-23-2007, 12:50 PM
Originally posted by geoffwessex:
Would that be George Bush (Snr)? He was a Lt(JG) flying from USS San Jacinto in an Avenger, Sept 44, attacking some Japanese installations. Shot down, he was the only survivor of the three crewmen. He was picked up by USS Finback.

Reference (http://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq10-1.htm)

Correct! You have the next question.

geoffwessex
04-23-2007, 03:08 PM
Thanks. Here's one....

One of the oversights of SH3 is to only allow radio reception by the submarine on the surface. This was correct for transmission, but incorrect for reception, as UBoats could receive Very Low Frequency (VLF) transmissions from Germany at huge ranges (e.g. Indian Ocean, South Africa, Caribbean) down to a depth of 18 and even 20 meters.

Up until 1943, the broadcast transmitter at Nauen, near Berlin was used for VLF (and other) transmissions. From 1943, a new and more powerful transmitter - probably the most powerful transmitter in the world with an output of 800kw - started operations, near Magdeburg. What was its name?

Poseidon_142
04-24-2007, 04:12 AM
could it have been the Gartow-Höhbeck?

geoffwessex
04-24-2007, 08:26 AM
That was certainly one of the 'Norddeich' HF transmitters which also broadcast to submarines, but I'm after a VLF transmitter - and it was near Magdeburg. Good effort, though!

Poseidon_142
04-24-2007, 11:25 AM
Oh ok well I was probably close.
Can I have another go?

geoffwessex
04-24-2007, 01:45 PM
Go ahead - as uaual, first one with the correct answer gets to set the next question.

VikingGrandad
04-26-2007, 07:59 AM
I remember reading about this transmitter in either 'The Secret Diary of a U-boat' or 'Iron Coffins' (probably the former book, as it was written by an Oberfunkmeister).

I think you're referring to 'Goliath'. Here's some info I found:

The Goliath VLF wireless station was located near Magdeburg. It had to replace the Nauen VLF station (north of Berlin), as its antenna system only had 10% radiation efficiency.

It could effectively generate 1,000kW antenna power, although, for practical reasons, its radiated power had to be reduced to maximal 800kW.

Its signals could be received by submerged U-boats near Capetown and/or the Straight of Mallaca (Penang), at about 8-12m under the surface (measured from the top of the conning-tower).

geoffwessex
04-26-2007, 08:29 AM
Spot on, VG. The underwater reception was also achieved by submarines reading the British VLF transmitter at Rugby (GBR on 16kHz). And that was still the case until a couple of years ago.

Over to you.

VikingGrandad
04-28-2007, 06:57 PM
It's getting tougher to find new questions! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/typing.gif

U-22, a Type IIB, sank nine ships in her short wartime career. One of U-22's last victims was a Royal Navy warship. What was its name? What did the ship inadvertently do to make herself an easier target for U-22?

Realjambo
04-29-2007, 06:28 AM
I'm saying it was HMS Exmouth. As for what it did to 'help' U-22, I haven't found anything as yet. I'll hazard a guess that it turned broadside on to the U-Boat making it easier to target?

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v642/antsmith/dd_hms_exmouth.jpg

uboat.net: "HMS Exmouth (Capt. Richard Stoddart Benson, DSO, RN) was torpodoed on 21 January 1940 by the German submarine U-22 off Tarbett Ness in the Moray Firth. HMS Exmouth was hit at 0444 hrs, sinking with no survivors in position 58º18'N, 02º25'W, east-south-east of Wick, Scotland. The wreck lies in 40 meter of water."

geoffwessex
04-29-2007, 06:44 AM
Exmouth was off Aberdeen (AN1684) escorting a merchant ship, the Cyprian Prince, and was showing a bright stern light. U-22, (KL Karl-Heinrich Jenisch), saw the light (it was before 0500 on a January morning) and sunk her with two torpedoes, the second of which hit the destroyer's magazine.

VikingGrandad
04-29-2007, 07:21 AM
RJ & Geoffwessex - you're both correct http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif (except the bit about turning broadside - there's no mention of that from what I've read, although I think we can assume that Exmouth must have been somewhere close to a broadside position for U-22 to hit her with two torps)

I guess Geoff should ask the next question as he gave the more complete answer, if that's OK with you RJ? Or maybe whoever posts a question first?!

EDIT - forgot to add my source: http://ubootwaffe.net/research/reports.cgi?a=8

geoffwessex
04-29-2007, 07:28 AM
Interesting.... I found some further information on Exmouth's sinking. Apparently "two well-lit neutral ships" had been following the merchant, 'Cyprian Prince'.
U-22's patrol diary says that, "they saw the illuminated neutral ships heading north west. While Jenisch was looking at them, a blacked-out destroyer, followed by a similarly darkened steamship, unexpectedly moved across his line of sight between the U-boat and the illuminated ships. Had it not been for the lights of the neutral ships, he would not have spotted the darkened ships at all."

So, was the Exmouth at fault? Seems that the stern light hadn't been a factor after all.

Found it HERE (http://www.geocities.com/exmouthhms1940assoc/hmsexmouthrnb.htm)

VikingGrandad
04-29-2007, 07:45 AM
I just re-read that page I found. Exmouth was actually hit by just one torpedo - there was a secondary explosion (the magazine) resulting from the first torpedo hit.

And like you say Geoff, the destroyer spotted by U-22 because it was silhouetted against the merchant ships' lights. However, the RN would not necessarily have realized this, so they assumed it was the stern light that attracted the U-boat's attention.


While Jenisch was looking at them, a blacked-out destroyer, followed by a similarly darkened steamship, unexpectedly moved into his line of sight between the U-boat and the illuminated ships. Had it not been for the lights of the neutral ships, he would not have spotted the darkened ships at all. Caught by surprise, Jenisch accelerated to try to get into a good firing position, but was unable to get ahead of the destroyer. After a pursuit lasting almost an hour he fired one torpedo at the destroyer, and a second at the steamship. The first torpedo exploded after 2 minutes 35 seconds, when it hit Exmouth in the starboard side at the forward magazine, sparking off a tremendous secondary explosion and producing thick black smoke.

The second torpedo exploded after a run of 4 minutes 7 seconds. This shot had obviously failed "” a dud, or a miss, perhaps due to the steamship changing course after the first detonation was heard.

Jenisch tried to chase the steamer, but had to take avoiding action to prevent his U-boat ramming into the ship as it turned to run west towards the coast at a speed of at least 12.5 knots "” U-22's maximum speed. Cyprian Prince was actually doing 13 knots, and U-22 was unable to catch the ship, and had no opportunity to fire any further torpedoes at it.

It would seem that the torpedo fired at the Cyprian Prince may not have missed. The banging noise that wakened Chief Engineer Montgomery might possibly have been the torpedo hitting several times against the side of the vessel as it passed at an angle without the contact pistol firing. After the torpedo cleared the ship's side it would continue to the end of its run before sinking.


The Admiralty Board of Enquiry spent some time considering the effectiveness of Exmouth's Asdic, and found that Benson [the Exmouth's captain] had not given Wilson [the Cyprian Prince's captain] clear instructions, and that his signal "Follow me" was wholly inadequate. They also stated that Benson should not have shown a stern light, as this was inviting attack. Normal convoy practice would have been for the escort to take station on the convoy, rather than the other way around.