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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:00 PM
Hey Can anyone tell me how Deep a BUSY international Airport Runway Is?

As in like how many Metres deep, say LAX Airport's Tarmac is. Im waging my friend $10, in saying That Melbourne's Airport was 10m deep. I heard it is by my CO I think. ANyway does anyone kno how deep they normally are if they are concrete? If sum Aussie would be able to tell me how Deep melbourne is that'd be Smack Bang awesome. Cheers Guys

"China is a Big Country, Inhabited by many Chinese People"- Quoted by a FORMER French President

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:00 PM
Hey Can anyone tell me how Deep a BUSY international Airport Runway Is?

As in like how many Metres deep, say LAX Airport's Tarmac is. Im waging my friend $10, in saying That Melbourne's Airport was 10m deep. I heard it is by my CO I think. ANyway does anyone kno how deep they normally are if they are concrete? If sum Aussie would be able to tell me how Deep melbourne is that'd be Smack Bang awesome. Cheers Guys

"China is a Big Country, Inhabited by many Chinese People"- Quoted by a FORMER French President

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 05:27 PM
if it any help as a reference B-36 ramps were about 36 inches or just under a meter of concrete.

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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 05:37 PM
I've seen plenty of tarmac construction; last at O'Hare Intl' earlier this year. I'm pretty sure the standard is around 3ft, reinforced concrete. I don't know how they prep the soil underneath, but it's not with any 'structure'.

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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 06:52 PM
I can't help you with the thickness of a specific airport runway, but I believe the thickness can vary significantly depending upon regional location (depth of frostline in winter), general soil conditions, quality of local concrete (again a regional thing), and I'm sure other factors known mostly to civil engineers. Denver International Airport just completed a new runway that is four times the thickness of a typical automobile highway (whatever that is). In Memphis, their new runway is 18 inch thick unreinforced concrete, four inch thick porous asphalt drainage layer, eight inch thick cement-treated aggregate base on a six inch thick soil-cement working platform. Full underdrain design was also included.

The Canadian government has a pretty good description of runway thickness at the link below.

http://www.tc.gc.ca/CivilAviation/Aerodrome/Technical/Pavement/menu.htm

Good luck on your bet!


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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 08:07 PM
10 meters is a bit over kill, concrete isn't exactly cheap. Minimum to get the job done, not many places where any less than a meter can't get the job done. Heavy traffic automative will do with 8 inches, any more is a waste of resources.

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 08:25 PM
I worked on the taxi-way, parking apron for the L-1011 plant in Palmdale California and if my memory surves me right the runway for plant 42 was 24" and taxi-ways fron 24" to 18". Parking aprons at 36". They flew U-2s, SR-71s, and YA-12As from here too. Was kind of funny, they made the military stop high powered take offs with the SR-71s after they had broke most of the windows in Quartz Hill a couple of times.

~S~Rab09

XyZspineZyX
11-02-2003, 10:09 AM
Ok, Um how thick do u guys think it would be if It was just Cement and Water mixed together? No reinforcements?
and answer in metres please as Im a dummy with imperial Measurements

"China is a Big Country, Inhabited by many Chinese People"- Quoted by a FORMER French President

XyZspineZyX
11-02-2003, 12:12 PM
As i know it, most runways are made from 1 meter layers of reinforced concrete and have heating installations underneath (large airports only) to melt the ice and snow in wintertime. I think those pipes can go up to 5 meters deep.

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