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XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 05:48 PM
every body has saw in historical documentary on WW2 those gun movies where you can see a fw190 being shoot and with landing gear down because of hydrolical system damaged on plane.

it will add a lot to the game if you firing at a plane and saw his landing gear going down because of loss of hydrolical pressure.

don t know if my english is understable but anyway he write it lol.

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XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 05:48 PM
every body has saw in historical documentary on WW2 those gun movies where you can see a fw190 being shoot and with landing gear down because of hydrolical system damaged on plane.

it will add a lot to the game if you firing at a plane and saw his landing gear going down because of loss of hydrolical pressure.

don t know if my english is understable but anyway he write it lol.

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NN_EnigmuS.
Normandie Niemen virtuel.
http://www.normandieniemen.firstream.net/

XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 06:15 PM
That would look cool to see it drop a leg when damaged, you are correct damage to the Hydraulic system lets the undercarriage free fall under its own weight. not sure if they carry uplocks as some planes like the Seneca don't, they rely on pressure forming an hydraulic lock to maintain the gear raised, so if you lose pressure the gear will freefall.



Incidentlly if your interested and to show how basic things can get, the Whitley bomber had the Bomb Bay doors held shut by elastic bungee cords, so when they dropped the bombs they would fall onto the bomb door, the weight would open the door the bomb would fall out and the rubber bungee would slam them shut again... Gulp!

XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 06:45 PM
The hydraulic system is not modelled in Il-2 FB.

Look at the flaps, you can freely extend and retract them. Some of them run on pneumatics, some of them on electrix, some of them on hydraulics. Something is needed to power any of those systems, namely, a running engine.

BTW, in the case of hanging undercarriages under the FW, there is something just shot-away. All the undercarriage doors are locked and ONLY if the latches are shot-away or something is seriously bent, the legs will stick out.

You also don't need (too much) hydraulic power to extende the landing gear. It falls by gravity itself. Altough you need to open some hydraulic valves probably, just so there won't be any vacum in the system.

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2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye
shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be
measured to you again.

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XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 07:05 PM
For what its worth, in the Beta08, I was in a P40 fighting against I16's (rookie). After falling in behind one, and shooting for a very long time (some 5 seconds of solid hits, estimated), the landing gear Did drop, we were over 1000m altitude (over 2000 if I remember correctly), I immediately stopped firing and attempted to watch him, he descended at a pretty fast rate (much to fast for landing) and crashed into the ground. I believe this to be the effect you are refering to, though I have not seen it again.

XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 10:10 PM
really happy that you undestand me on that post lol.

its a fact that yAk 3 have great land gear problem too causing some "drop of legs" whitout any damage on plane and it will be a very cool immersive things in combat to see the landing gear down when taking damage.

i ve seen it on WW2 documentary so much time lol so that it must be quite a common thing don t know the exact plane subject to that but it will be a great add.

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XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 10:45 PM
Just saw this the other day.


I was in a 190 firing at a mustang. After a couple of bursts into it, the gear dropped,the plane went down, and exploded.


Very Cool indeed.


widgeon

XyZspineZyX
08-21-2003, 11:58 PM
Platypus_1.JaVA wrote:

BTW, in the case of hanging undercarriages under the
FW, there is something just shot-away. All the
undercarriage doors are locked and ONLY if the
latches are shot-away or something is seriously
bent, the legs will stick out.

The up Locks are on the legs, and the doors are attached to the legs, you dont lock undercarriage doors also you would not need to open any valves, simply shoot a hydraulic line out and it will free fall asuming the lock is also out of action.

Some Aircraft these days use an independant electrohydraulic pack that does away with uplocks totally and uses microswitches, assuming the gear is up the switch is made and the hyd pump motor stops running, get a drop in pressure in a line so the gear starts to sag, the microswitch breaks the pump starts, pressure is restored and the gear moves up till the switch makes, then a hyraulic lock prevents it moving till pressure drops and it all starts again.

not all systems are neccesarily engine driven flaps etc are often pneumatic and have a reservoir that will supply air even after the engine is stopped, a Spit is a case in question, and dont forget the wheel brakes were also often air driven /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

XyZspineZyX
08-22-2003, 04:00 PM
Taylortony wrote:
- Platypus_1.JaVA wrote:
-
- BTW, in the case of hanging undercarriages under the
-
-
- FW, there is something just shot-away. All the
-
- undercarriage doors are locked and ONLY if the
-
- latches are shot-away or something is seriously
-
- bent, the legs will stick out.
-
-
- The up Locks are on the legs, and the doors are
- attached to the legs, you dont lock undercarriage
- doors also you would not need to open any valves,
- simply shoot a hydraulic line out and it will free
- fall asuming the lock is also out of action.

True but, that's some kind of locking too.
-
- Some Aircraft these days use an independant
- electrohydraulic pack that does away with uplocks
- totally and uses microswitches, assuming the gear is
- up the switch is made and the hyd pump motor stops
- running, get a drop in pressure in a line so the
- gear starts to sag, the microswitch breaks the pump
- starts, pressure is restored and the gear moves up
- till the switch makes, then a hyraulic lock prevents
- it moving till pressure drops and it all starts
- again.

We where talking WWII fighters, not modern airliners /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif
-
-
- not all systems are neccesarily engine driven flaps
- etc are often pneumatic and have a reservoir that
- will supply air even after the engine is stopped, a
- Spit is a case in question, and dont forget the
- wheel brakes were also often air driven

Okay, you've got a better knowledge then I do on WWII aircraft mechanisms but, I was an aircraft technician for a short period so, I know a little myself. I worked with Boeing 737's and a few minor aircraft.

1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye
shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be
measured to you again.

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XyZspineZyX
08-22-2003, 06:10 PM
Platypus_1.JaVA wrote

Okay, you've got a better knowledge then I do on
WWII aircraft mechanisms but, I was an aircraft
technician for a short period so, I know a little
myself. I worked with Boeing 737's and a few minor
aircraft.

Is was only using a modern analagy to show that some planes have different systems, hydraulics during the war were really just at their beginings of the technology brake wise etc, the Spit has for a better word Drum brakes but the pads are pushed into contact by a bag which is inflated. worked ok till they got hot.

I wasnt meaning to sound smart or anything like that, i was just giving you some engineering information which i thought may enhance your knowledge of them, sorry if it sounded the otherway, i just thought you might like to know /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif sorry...

whats a Minor Aircraft by the way?
I've worked on in the past and present Airliners, Jet fighters, Helicopters, executive jets, Light stuff oh and the Odd Spitfire /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

XyZspineZyX
08-22-2003, 06:44 PM
Taylortony wrote:
-
- Is was only using a modern analagy to show that
- some planes have different systems, hydraulics
- during the war were really just at their beginings
- of the technology brake wise etc, the Spit has for a
- better word Drum brakes but the pads are pushed into
- contact by a bag which is inflated. worked ok till
- they got hot.

I really didn't know that Hydraulice didn't play a major role in WWII aicraft. Driving flaps on air, seems a bit odd. Air can be compressed and can so prevent the flaps from deploying.

Oh well, I guess they found a way, it worked troughout the war /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif
-
-
- I wasnt meaning to sound smart or anything like
- that, i was just giving you some engineering
- information which i thought may enhance your
- knowledge of them, sorry if it sounded the otherway,
- i just thought you might like to know /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif sorry...

Nah... That's okay /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif
-
- whats a Minor Aircraft by the way?

Oh well, I meant that in an other way. I mainly worked on Boeing 737 (about 90% of the time) The other 10%, I worked on Cessna's, Pipers, Robinson helicopters, Pits Special, SU-29, Fokker S-11(I have photographic evidence of that /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif ) and other small aircraft.

The Fokker S-11 was really an honour to work on. It was a basic trainer for the Dutch air force altough, it went to some other countries as well. It was the first airplane built by Fokker, after WWII. For a 'light' airplane, it is really quite big and considerably larger then the standard Cessna 172. So, that one was pretty intresting. Its registration was: PH-SLO

I really enjoyed getting my hands dirty with that aircraft /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif


1 Judge not, that ye be not judged.
2 For with what judgment ye judge, ye
shall be judged: and with what
measure ye mete, it shall be
measured to you again.

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