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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:21 AM
I figure with all of the aviation enthusiasts we have on the board, some of you fly radio controlled planes. I never have, but am interested.

If you do fly models, what kind do you have? Any retailers you would suggest? Any suggestions on models for a novice?

Thanks.

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:21 AM
I figure with all of the aviation enthusiasts we have on the board, some of you fly radio controlled planes. I never have, but am interested.

If you do fly models, what kind do you have? Any retailers you would suggest? Any suggestions on models for a novice?

Thanks.

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:30 AM
Yeah, I'd like some pointers on how to start out,as well. I've got an unconstructed balsa wood Ju-87B that I was thinking about making flyable but I have no idea where to start....I'm about as "noob" as it gets when it comes to this sort of thing.

<center>47|FC <img src="http://rangerring.com/wwii/p-47.jpg"<

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 01:56 AM
A good way to educate yourself about eqipment and aircraft is to pick up an R/C enthusiast magazine and study it. You can learn about differences in engines, boxes, servos, and a/c, all the stuff you'll need to get started. I recommend starting out with a trainer model, which is much easier to fly and land than a warbird. R/C flyers usually fly in designated areas (parks), so you can show up at a site in your area and find plenty of folks who will be glad to help you get started. Some people learn on a "buddy box" setup, which is a controller hooked up to another, master controller box run by an experienced pilot. A web search will tell you all about the flyers in your area.

Horrido!

adlabs6
11-01-2003, 02:23 AM
missiveus wrote:
- A good way to educate yourself about eqipment and
- aircraft is to pick up an R/C enthusiast magazine
- and study it.

Magazines are the best education I've yet discovered. I read tons of them back when I was into R/C cars. Heck I even built my third PC from OEM parts after reading a magazine article! /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

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XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 03:07 AM
I'll bet you have the Guillow JU-87. Forget about that for now, unless you build it only for display. Not a bad idea, as extensive modifications are needed on that one.

I strongly suggest you go electric. You can fly in schoolfields, all sorts of places that will get you banned with gas. It's the noise. That is unless you live out in the country and have pasture access or something similar.

I almost had to quit because of this, it's a real problem now. Electric has saved the hobby for so many, and they fly great,power, reliability, clean, always start..its a great way to go with the state of the equipment now.

Get an electric trainer. The ones made of EPS foam will not smash to bits when you crash. Get a cheap 4 channel radio, an appropriate charger, batteries...it can add up a bit.

One way to go would be to get the New Creations R/C catalog. They are in Texas I think, have everything you could ever need, and will tell you what to get for your first set up. I'd call Kirk or whoever answers the phone down there, get a catalog sent, then call and ask questions. They won't steer you wrong.Very good rep. for that shop. Figure out your budget and get ready to place your order when you can. That is if you don't have good advice available locally.

Beware cheapie all in one prefab deals. They may or may not be worth it--a lot of prefab junk is out there that is a waste of money jsut waiting to trap beginners. You need to run every purchase by guys who know. Here's what to do:

Ask questions on this forum:

http://www.rcgroups.com/forums/index.php?topic=ezone

There are a lot of dedicated guys there. No flames, locked threads, temper tantrums etc.

email me if I can help later when you get things kind of lined up. woodren@drizzle.com

It's really fun. Good luck,

hans

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 03:24 AM
RC planes are great. Best recomendation I can think of is to find a local club and drop by. Probably a lot of guys there who can help you get started. Drop by your local hobby shop, to get directions to the field.

You will need to decide whether you go fuel or electric first.

Electric planes are clean, quiet, and can often be flown in smaller areas. They are usually smaller than fuel planes, but some can be quite large. Batteries, chargers and electric paraphenelia are quite expensive.

Fuel(glow) planes are generally larger, handle wind better, fly more like real aircraft, often sound more realistic, and usually have substantially more power than electric. Glow fuel is expensive. The larger models can use gasoline, but the servos and electronics for the larger models are expensive.

Those are generalizations, but basically true. I fly both, and enjoy them equally. Great to pop down to the local park after work and fly my tigermoth around the jungle gym and under the swings. Great also to drive out to the field and do 200 kph low-passes in my fuel powered flying wing.

I have 8 planes in my hangar now: a P-51, P-47, Zero, Waco biplane, Diamond Dust flying wing, Tigermoth, low wing sport plane, high wing trainer, and a flying pizza box. They are all a lot of fun.

Hope this helps.

Beergator

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 06:21 AM
I have been flying R/C for ~19 years, I have had lots of different things over the years, now I am flying a 1/4 scale and a .46 sized Ultimate Biplane, a 1/4 scale P-40 Warhawk, and an Ultra Sport. . .though I am looking at a Dave Patrick Edge 540T as we speak!
As far as getting started:
The first thing to do is look for an AMA sanctioned club in your area. Then ask them about instruction. Many times the club will provided you with an aircraft and instructor, using a "buddy cord" (allows two radios to control the aircraft so if things get out of hand teh instructor can easily take over). You will still want to invest in your own trainer aircraft however (I flew my trainers at the start of each flying day for 15 years of R/C, and never were they boring).

There are also r/c flight sims out there, but they are fairly costly, (199.99 including software and transmitter) provide nothing a good instructor with a buddy cord wont get you. (If you are also interested in helicopters, you might as well just buy it though!)


There are many options to look at, electric vs glow/gas, glider vs powered, ARF vs kit, etc. My oppinion is that a 4 channel high wing trainer with semi-symmetrical airfoil is the best bet for an aircraft that you will enjoy for some time, and that will be a little more representative of the more advanced aircraft you will most probably transition to. I do not think that the flat bottom airfoil is going to give you any major training benefit. A good example of such a design can be found here:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXPY56&P=0

this aircraft is also available as a almost totally built model with engine and radio installed:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXMU53**&P=0



You can also look into the ver durable (as teh name implies) Dura-Plane series if you fear crash damage!
(most crashes will not result on destruction of the aircraft, the wings are usually held on with rubber bands to minimize structural damage, and the radio and engien should also survive most minor crashes. Remember: Epoxy really does wonders! But just for good measure here is the duraplane in the .40 size:

http://www2.towerhobbies.com/cgi-bin/wti0001p?&I=LXE586&P=0

Here are a few r/c links:

http://www.towerhobbies.com

http://www.rcuniverse.com


http://www.hobby-lobby.com

And here is the TX-Squadron R/C Forum. . . feel free to ask whatever. . . it won't be OT!

http://www.txsquadron.com/forum.asp?FORUM_ID=20

S!
TX-EcoDragon
Black 1
TX Squadron XO


Member-Team Raven
http://www.waynehandley.com

(Former)Reserve Pilot Aircraft #2 of Gruppo 313
Pattuglia Acrobatica Virtuale
http://www.vhvt.com/

http://www.attitudeaviation.com/

http://www.calaggieflyers.com/



http://www.txsquadron.com/uploaded/TX-EcoDragon/ravenvert.jpg




Message Edited on 10/31/0309:26PM by TX-EcoDragon

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 07:21 AM
Gas planes are nice too, if you have the option. Noise is the limiting factor in many urban areas; lots of model flying fields have been closed,gas models banned from parks, schools, etc. . In Seattle it is out of the question. There isn't a park in the city limits where you wont get the cops called on you. If there is a club with a flying field near you, and they are taking new members. than you are in luck. Or it may be that noise is no problem where you live.In that case, try gas if it appeals to you. Thats all I flew until I had no choice but to quit or find another way. I sure didn't want to switch, but now I'm glad I did.

Personally,I really like the clean, reliable power of electrics. With gearboxes driving the props, you can get all the power you could want. Multi engine setup are really practical, as many of the gas engine power balance and reliability problems that make multi's such a challenge just don't exist with an electric.


And when you are done flying, there is no spilled fuel ,no oily mess to wipe off. It's quick, easy, nice and quiet so you can fly all sorts of places. (pontoons on a lake are really fun) Smaller, delicate kits like the Guillows JU-87 are best converted to electric, because of the lack of vibration; this lets you use a flimsier airframe without it shaking to bits. Many small guillows kits have been converted to electric, by experienced modelers.

hans

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 10:17 AM
TX-EcoDragon wrote:
- There are also r/c flight sims out there, but they
- are fairly costly, (199.99 including software and
- transmitter) provide nothing a good instructor with
- a buddy cord wont get you. (If you are also
- interested in helicopters, you might as well just
- buy it though!)

For a free R/C simulator, try FMS (Flying Model Simulator)

http://n.ethz.ch/student/mmoeller/fms/index_e.html

I'm using a Futaba transmitter plugged into the PC through sound card line-in port.

Smart Propo

http://www.sekiriki.jp/smartpropo/index.html

A small .dll file to be put in the FMS directory, which lets FMS recognize a transmitter plugged into the line-in port. The site has explanations on what cable to use.

Totally free ;P

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 02:48 PM
Its cleaning the aircraft after flying thats the funny stuff /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Im just flying trainers atm but its fun as heck, i wanna try a monowinged plane soon tho /i/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Boos16
249th
RSO

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 03:04 PM
Check out spadtothebone.com

modeler since 1941
Favorite obsession=control line speed

Truth is the first casualty of war.
Conscience is the next.

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 04:35 PM
Yep, I have a bunch of them.

I fly electrics because its fast to get in the air, less expensive, and I can fly in front of my house.

Don't start with a warbird as you will quickly end up with trash - they fly like the real thing.

Get a high wing trainer or slow biplane for your first ones...

I have a ducted fan A10, a me109, zero, mustang and a wwi Eindecker. I learned on a GWS tigermoth...

<img src=http://home.insightbb.com/%7Edspinnett/NonSpeed/SpeedToys.jpg </img>
http://hometown.aol.com/spinnetti/

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 05:17 PM
Spinnetti wrote:

- I have a ducted fan A10, a me109, zero, mustang and
- a wwi Eindecker. I learned on a GWS tigermoth...

Grand Wing Servos? What, are you from Taiwan (I am) or GWS actually exports these planes? I was really considering getting the Mustang of theirs.

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 06:47 PM
That tigermoth has a great reputation. All good, from the posts I've read. Flies slow, prefabricated, you can get the pacage deal with everything you need from some dealers.

I've seen it at the hobby shop. Foam, but pretty cute.

Possibly you could do a lot worse. Do you guys think it could be a trainer?

Hmm...now I want one.

hans
HomeboyWu wrote:
-
- Spinnetti wrote:
-
-- I have a ducted fan A10, a me109, zero, mustang and
-- a wwi Eindecker. I learned on a GWS tigermoth...
-
- Grand Wing Servos? What, are you from Taiwan (I am)
- or GWS actually exports these planes? I was really
- considering getting the Mustang of theirs.
-
-

XyZspineZyX
11-01-2003, 07:59 PM
Start with a nice trainer craft.

My favorite is the SIG Kadet SR. with a 40-size engine.

It's tricycle landing gear, not a tail dragger. You can build it for 3 channels. Throttle,Rudder, and Elevator. When you get used to flying that then get a Wing Kit for it (Replacement wing) and add the Ailerons for a nice docile 4-channel set-up.

You get a Fighter type aircraft and it will fly like a real fighter, fast as "Heck", and very touchy to fly.


Believe me when you first start out you will have your hands full just trying to keep it in the air, and in one piece.

When you get tired of it, then go for the fighter or sport type planes that go fast as lightning.

The old addage of "crawl before you walk" fits here.

Another hint : See if your local Hobby Shop is into RC Planes. It's a good bet that there is a local flying club that posts Dates on the bulletin board there that they have open fun flys, or come on down and meet a flying instructor at the field.

Also get a membership in the AMA. They provide insurance for your flying. You hit some one's car or house and you'll be glad that you have it.


Sorry for being so long winded, but I hope this helps you out.

Catch ya later...watch yer'6

XyZspineZyX
11-02-2003, 01:59 AM
Hans_Svetty wrote:
- That tigermoth has a great reputation. All good,
- from the posts I've read. Flies slow, prefabricated,
- you can get the pacage deal with everything you
- need from some dealers.
-
- I've seen it at the hobby shop. Foam, but pretty
- cute.
-
- Possibly you could do a lot worse. Do you guys think
- it could be a trainer?
-
- Hmm...now I want one.
-

IMO, its a good a trainer as is possible to find..

DO NOT fly in windy conditions however!
-
-



<img src=http://home.insightbb.com/%7Edspinnett/NonSpeed/SpeedToys.jpg </img>
http://hometown.aol.com/spinnetti/

XyZspineZyX
11-02-2003, 02:02 AM
HomeboyWu wrote:
-
- Spinnetti wrote:
-
-- I have a ducted fan A10, a me109, zero, mustang and
-- a wwi Eindecker. I learned on a GWS tigermoth...
-
- Grand Wing Servos? What, are you from Taiwan (I am)
- or GWS actually exports these planes? I was really
- considering getting the Mustang of theirs.



You would think so with as many GWS planes as I have, but no, I live in the US (Cincinatti OH area)...

GWS does export, and they are the best planes for the money.. note that they are not the best planes, but sure are the best for the $50 or so bucks they cost here....



<img src=http://home.insightbb.com/%7Edspinnett/NonSpeed/SpeedToys.jpg </img>
http://hometown.aol.com/spinnetti/

XyZspineZyX
11-02-2003, 03:48 AM
Spinnetti wrote:
-
- You would think so with as many GWS planes as I
- have, but no, I live in the US (Cincinatti OH
- area)...
-
- GWS does export, and they are the best planes for
- the money.. note that they are not the best planes,
- but sure are the best for the $50 or so bucks they
- cost here....

Quite agree! Great for beginners or park/campus fliers. A member of our club is building a GWS Zero (which I believe is the first in their WWII line). It looks to be a good performer.

Just make sure NOT to get the Mini Dragonfly...