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Pirschjaeger
03-27-2006, 08:44 AM
SPIEGEL ONLINE - March 27, 2006, 12:21 PM
URL: http://www.spiegel.de/international/0,1518,407764,00.html
Draftophobia

Blown Away by the Fear of Air

A lot of Germans don't like drafts. Some even seem to have an
irrational fear of moving air, believing it can cause pneumonia, flu,
colds, clogged arteries and just about every malady imaginable. Two
readers over their views of this unusual German quirk.

Coming to Germany for the World Cup this summer? If so, it is
important to know a certain phrase you will probably hear: "Es zieht!"
Years ago, I traveled through Germany with a group from my high
school. One sultry day, we opened the windows of the train we were
riding in to allow some air to circulate. Immediately, people from all
corners of the train started complaining "es zieht," then got up and
began closing the windows and letting us know how displeased they were
with our actions.
None of us could understand any German and we had no idea what was
going on until someone took the time to explain it to us. The
explanation was that if we open the windows, the air would blow
through the train. We explained that we realized this and it was for
precisely that reason that we opened the windows in the first place.
They won the battle by making sure that all the windows remained
closed in our sweltering railway car for the duration of the journey.
We remained quietly seated, drained because of the heat and confused
by what had happened.
Sometime later at the home of a friend, I was asked if I felt the
breeze from an open window. I replied that I did and to my dismay the
window was promptly closed. It was at that moment that it finally hit
me, what was enjoyable for me, was quite a serious problem for my
German friends.
Germans love fresh air and open their home and office windows quite
often, for a short time -- winter or summer -- in an exercize they
call "lüften," or "airing out," and yet they are deathly afraid of any
drafts.

For almost 20 years now I have been in Germany and every summer it is
the same. In an attempt to relieve the heat at the office, I will open
a few windows to get some air flowing. I always know what is coming,
but I still cringe when I hear it. Someone will say "Es zieht" (there
is a draft) and ask that the windows be closed. I bring my own fan to
work and year after year it is a problem to find a place to put it as
my German colleagues are absolutely convinced the blowing wind will
land them in the hospital.

Contributed by Robert Dynan in M¶rfelden-Walldorf.

One of the most bizarre quirks I experienced in my 2 years living in
Germany was what I like to call draftophobia. What is draftophobia,
you ask? I define it as an irrational fear of moving air. As an
American, I grew up with open windows in cars, buildings and houses.
If the car isn't at a standstill, heaven forbid if you happen to roll
down a window in a car full of Germans. I have endured many hot and
sweaty drives with my German friends who lacked air-conditioning. At
first, I thought, "well they are just waiting for the air-conditioner
to kick-in." Finally, we stopped at a red light and the windows went
down in unison. Ahhh, fresh air! Then the light turned green and the
windows went back up, trapping in the hot air until the next red
light. If you are unlucky enough to be stuck driving on the autobahn,
you might have to endure hours without moving air. You arrive at your
destination in sweat-soaked clothing wanting nothing more than a
two-liter bottle of water.
My German wife once explained draftophobia to me. According to leading
scholars and doctors in Germany, she said, drafts are responsible for
pneumonia, flu, colds, clogged arteries and just about every malady
imaginable. Yet the biggest paradox of all is that Germans are busy
walking and cycling throughout quaint little villages and busy urban
streets on a regular basis.

Ok guyz, is this really true? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

eskimo-again
03-27-2006, 08:47 AM
its true. the older they(we) get the more draft intolerant they(we) get.

it is borderline phobia for sure.

personally i love a draft but that makes me the exception which prooves the rule..

nice find btw http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

similar to the draftophobia is the wet hair paranoia which would make my parents force me to wear a beanie when ever it was below 15C outside and my hair was wet from the shower.
they were convinced i d get seriously sick if i didnt wear it.
needless to say the beanie came off as soon as i was out of sight and never once did i catch even the slightest hint of a cold.

probably tradition or something.

JtD
03-27-2006, 08:52 AM
Sure. But now WE invented air conditioning and made sure you cannot open windows anymore...even our football arenas are closed and we expect at least 40?C with a maximum of 16% Oxygen in the air.

But certainly noone will get a flue, other than bird flue that is.

OldMan____
03-27-2006, 08:52 AM
Lol... now that you mentioned it. I also remember a German guy always closing the windows on that the russians left open (we lived in a student house in Erlangen). At that time I tought was just a different conception of "Today is a cold day" between the germans and russians. Now everything is exaplained!!! LOL

JG53Frankyboy
03-27-2006, 08:53 AM
and btw, there is a huge difference in male and female anti-draft behaviour too http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

VW-IceFire
03-27-2006, 08:59 AM
Wow...thats an unusual one for sure. I'm a big fan of sitting at the bow of a ship or motorboat and putting my face into the wind. I think its great...also great when there is a good breeze coming down into the valley where I live. Good during the summer anyways...during the winter not as nice...I usually duck and hide from the windchill.

Interesting thing tho. I wonder how many idiosyncracies my fellow Canadians and I have http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-27-2006, 09:10 AM
Originally posted by VW-IceFire:
Interesting thing tho. I wonder how many idiosyncracies my fellow Canadians and I have http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Distance! Never stand to close to a Canadian. We got space and we like it.

Just yesterday I was visiting a buddy(Ricardo). He's half German and half Spanish. When he says goodbye to people, male or female, it involves a hug and kisses. I had warned him before.

When his arms went up and toward me I stopped him with a nice double block. I told him to go easy with the Spanish culture(as I warned him before)or I`d give him a taste of the angry Canadian moose culture. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Oldman, I'm pretty close to Erlangen. Do you remember Lichtenfels?

Another odd thing about us Canucks, when we meet someone, and right after we exchange names, we ask the other person "Where are ya from?".

This freaks a few people out but don't be alrmed; it's Canadian diplomacy. The reason we ask is because we want to talk about YOU. This usually makes people feel more comfortable. Besides that, we probably got a cousin there. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

But that draft stuff is just a little too wierd for me. Growing up by the sea in Nova Scotia(very windy), I learnt to be afraid when there was no draft. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

Abbuzze
03-27-2006, 09:13 AM
Hehe, yes it could happen. I usually drive with my window open in my car. But I know a lot of people who dislike this - If I sit at the back seats and got all the dust and flies and stuff in my face, which which not hit the driver I dislike it also, besided the fact that it became very noisy in a car at high speed. Maybe this is also a cause. A fully open window at 110 mph is no real fun for me http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

For houses, I think it is a different story. German houses are usually made of stone. The high mass of stone compared to wooden houses is able to save energy (temperature). In summer it´s usually colder inside the house due the colder walls, so open the window and letting hotter air in will rise the energy level and warm up the masonry. So closed windows keep the house cold.
In winter it´s vice versa. The walls are warmed up by the warm summer. If you let the windows open all the time you waste a lot of energy and the masonry get cold faster. Energy is very expansive in Europe. So maybe this paranoia are also resulting the different oil consumption between USA and Germany.

In high end housed in germany you even have no heating - they called "passiv houses" because they have no active heating. They are heated by the thermal energy of the human bodies ( 100 W/h from each person) and the thermal "waste" of electial devices like PC´s. In such houses it´s forbidden to open the windows - they have a mechanical ventilation. This is even hard for most germans! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passive_house

http://www.tsb.wetterau.de/engl/engl_allgem/neh-eng-n1.htm

Brain32
03-27-2006, 09:20 AM
It's not only Germans that are "afraid" of the draft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif In Croatia it's common also(multiplied by age ofcourse), we let the fresh air in, and then close everything, we even call it "luftanje" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif but no prolonged exposure to drafts...

Pirschjaeger
03-27-2006, 09:25 AM
Hi Peter,

after reading your explanation I think I see. The oddity really doesn't exsist. I think the writers of the articles wetre blowing the reality out of proportion.

One thing I did notice here is that no matter how cold it is in the mornings, the windows still get opened and often the bedding is hanging out the windows.

And yes, who in their right mind would want to be on the autobahn at 200km plus with the windows opened even slightly? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

The writers are telling fish stories me thinks. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-27-2006, 09:27 AM
Originally posted by Brain32:
It's not only Germans that are "afraid" of the draft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif In Croatia it's common also(multiplied by age ofcourse), we let the fresh air in, and then close everything, we even call it "luftanje" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif but no prolonged exposure to drafts...

I think the fear of drafts is universal. In Canada, Egypt, China, and Germany, I often frown as people claim the are going to get sick when there's a draft.

djetz
03-27-2006, 09:59 AM
The first thing I do when I walk into a room where I'm in charge is to open a window. Airflow is good. Stuffiness is evil.

But I don't think it's related to being Australian.

OldMan____
03-27-2006, 10:00 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:


Oldman, I'm pretty close to Erlangen. Do you remember Lichtenfels?



Yes, But I only passed there one day when I overslept in the train back from Nurnberg http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif . Ie been back into Brazil for some time now, but I want to get back to make my Ph.D. Probably next year.


This reminded me of something else. I remember in 2003 around Cristmas. We had a long perior of raining in Erlangen and everyone was so worried and scared with the amount of rain. "Its too strong rain and for too long time, the river level is 3 meters higher!". That day I discovered Germans are afraid of rain. Come here at Brasil during our summer to discover what real rain is about! Rain that can hurt your skin you you stay out on it.!!! And that can make the city river rise 7 meters in 2 hours!!

JtD
03-27-2006, 10:16 AM
This is probably because we lived in caves far before the first human set foot to America and we lived in houses far before modern civilization rediscovered it. We are not used to the elements anymore.

I give you another century and you will be just like us. Resistance is futile.

Pirschjaeger
03-27-2006, 10:26 AM
Oldman, did you ever notice there is no extreme weather in Franken? Never to hot, never too cold, never too windy, and never too much rain. But to the people here, I guess they are not used to the weathers we endured and got used to.

OldMan____
03-27-2006, 10:45 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Oldman, did you ever notice there is no extreme weather in Franken? Never to hot, never too cold, never too windy, and never too much rain. But to the people here, I guess they are not used to the weathers we endured and got used to.

In the first weeks there I tought God had forgotten to add wind in the scenario builder into Erlangen. No wind at all. That is a NEVER happens situation here (I live in an 40 km long Island close to Brasil coast). Here the everyday wind is a 50-70km/h wind. Florian³polis is known for the fact that you can be in a sunny day, watching a beautifull blue sky, but just above you there is a lonely cloud droping more rain that you could think is is phisicaly possible.

It is the completely oposite weather to Franken.


At least we have some of the most beutiful woman in world http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

zugfuhrer
03-27-2006, 11:07 AM
It is true and that is why they where so bad pilots and sailors.

danjama
03-27-2006, 11:21 AM
There are some strange people about. Me? I really am not a fussy person. I think i prefer the summer and heat, i love to be warm, but i am content in the cold winter and the rain we get most of the year. However, i do get annoyed when its winter, freezing outside, and people want to open the garden door or windows, i really hate that! When im indoors i want to be warm. If i wanted to be cold id go outside. But i dont mind the cold if im out and about.

Bremspropeller
03-27-2006, 11:24 AM
Well, I prefer to be hot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

ColoradoBBQ
03-27-2006, 11:24 AM
That explains why the Germans created a large submarine fleet.

BSS_Goat
03-27-2006, 11:33 AM
To put this on topic.
How did they recruit Stuka gunners?
What about motorcycles?

OldMan____
03-27-2006, 11:39 AM
See? Everything starts to make sense!


We probably can explain all the reasons to WW2 on this subject. Who wanna try?

danjama
03-27-2006, 11:48 AM
German luftwaffe broke down eventually caus they just couldnt get past the fear of a breeze breaking through that canopy. Makes sense now.

JtD
03-27-2006, 12:08 PM
Originally posted by BSS_Goat:
To put this on topic.
How did they recruit Stuka gunners?
What about motorcycles?

I'd like to point towards the high loss ratio of the Stuka. By now you should know the reason. It's just a pain to fly when you have a flue.

If you see Germans on motorbikes you will find they carry full leather suit and a closed helmet. This is to protect from drafts. As a sideffect, it also helps to protect the rider from accidents.

JuHa-
03-27-2006, 12:17 PM
Another odd thing about us Canucks, when we meet someone, and right after we exchange names, we ask the other person "Where are ya from?".

Finns have this too. And lotsa space also!

bienenbaer
03-27-2006, 12:18 PM
Yap, we are definitely a lousy bunch of sissies and weeners ... old people cannot stand (air) draft, while young most hate army draft.

Lodovik
03-27-2006, 12:27 PM
Had this been known internationaly in the 1930s' the WW2 could have been prevented by building giant fans in French and Polish borders...

And Croats too. This explains some weird experiences I've had visiting relatives there.

Bremspropeller
03-27-2006, 12:28 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/351.gif

slipBall
03-27-2006, 02:22 PM
I'm of full German ancestry, I love the wind blowing where my hair used to be. So it's safe to say, I love a draft, in fact I'm drinking one right now, a SPATEN http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

fordfan25
03-27-2006, 02:28 PM
Originally posted by ColoradoBBQ:
That explains why the Germans created a large submarine fleet. lol

mandrill7
03-27-2006, 03:36 PM
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"

Perhaps this has something to do with their fear of drafts.

slipBall
03-27-2006, 03:46 PM
Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"

Perhaps this has something to do with their fear of drafts.

It's more of a fear of being sent to the Russian front, for breaking rule's http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

MB_Avro_UK
03-27-2006, 03:53 PM
PJ...

I have sent a Paramedic and a Doctor on an emergency mission to give you some treatment... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

LStarosta
03-27-2006, 04:04 PM
HELL NO WE WONT GO!!!

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_mad.gif

F19_Orheim
03-27-2006, 04:31 PM
Originally posted by Brain32:
It's not only Germans that are "afraid" of the draft http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif In Croatia it's common also(multiplied by age ofcourse), we let the fresh air in, and then close everything, we even call it "luftanje" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif but no prolonged exposure to drafts...


cr@p.. that explains everything... after 12 years together now i know the reason for my wife's Draftophobia.... she is half German and half Croatian... go figure, it's in her genes....

huggy87
03-27-2006, 04:37 PM
I noticed they also hate to leave doors open, but that is well known. One other one that surprised me was that they didn't like me running around bare foot. The family I lived with said I would catch a cold?! Maybe I just have ugly feet.

Ominae-
03-27-2006, 05:55 PM
I've heard that one before, the whole bare feet = catching a flu, not only Germans thats for sure.

Its true that if your feet are cold, your body gets cold, but I think its more or less a wives tale.

blakduk
03-27-2006, 06:21 PM
This explains a lot of things.
I saw the movie 'Stalingrad'- lots of wind there, that's what must have saved the Russians http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif
The English channel also gets pretty windy- that stopped the LW and the Spanish Armada- (maybe they have 'draftphobia' as well) http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

HerrGraf
03-27-2006, 10:03 PM
I don't know about any German phobia with drafts, but come July and August Death Valley California is filled with nothing but German tourists.
Lowest point of land in North America and about 115 deg. F in the shade ( a very short commodity in the valley).

Boandlgramer
03-27-2006, 10:22 PM
I guess nobody here know a "F¶hnsturm" in southbavaria.
i am sure all you appointed " hard guys" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif would take a look for an wall or something like that .

back to the question.
yes its true for my mom, she is 81 years old, and "no" for me, my wife and my kids.
we like the wind http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif.

Pirsch,
Wenn hier ein Sturm oder heftiger Wind geht, gehe ich sehr gerne spazieren mit meiner Schwiegermutter zum Drachen steigen. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif


************************************************
Status Quo was ?
Achso,du meinst die englische Banausenband.

Dieter Bohlen

flakwagen
03-27-2006, 10:56 PM
There is merit to the idea that a draft can cause illness. If I forget to turn the air conditioner off before going to bed in the summer, I wake up with a nasty head cold and a sore throat. Cracking the windows in the car just a little bit is nice, but leaving them open all the way for any signifigant amount of time tends to make my nose stuff up.

There is a very pleasant town in California called Lompoc. The outdoor air feels like gentle air conditioning- it is pure Heaven compared to the humidity and intense heat of my native Southern state.

But the Lompoc indians, I am told, called the area "Valley of Death" because the constant cool breeze tended to make people sick. And even a simple head cold could lead to death in the era before basic medicine.

So is it unwise to crack a window when it is hot? Of course not. If you're hot, then crack it open. But leaving it open for a long time may result in respiratory irritation.

Galland

Abbuzze
03-28-2006, 01:42 AM
Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"


There is maybe an easy explantion for this.
It´s an unwritten rule, if childs are close don´t walk by red light. As an adult you are able to recoginze if no car is there or far away but an 8 year old child is not able to do this.
In the night or if no child are close all persons I know will walk at red light http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Monson74
03-28-2006, 01:56 AM
This explains the lack of sliding canopies on German planes - but they don't seem to be afraid of draught though http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

KIMURA
03-28-2006, 02:41 AM
But on the other hand the Germans don't use things like:

"use haldheld on stairs", "slippery when wet" plaques after cleaning up of the floor and other crazy things. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

BAG.LordDante
03-28-2006, 04:05 AM
Originally posted by Abbuzze:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"


There is maybe an easy explantion for this.
It´s an unwritten rule, if childs are close don´t walk by red light. As an adult you are able to recoginze if no car is there or far away but an 8 year old child is not able to do this.
In the night or if no child are close all persons I know will walk at red light http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Jup ! Don´t behave foolish in front of kids http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 04:39 AM
Originally posted by bienenbaer:
Yap, we are definitely a lousy bunch of sissies and weeners ... old people cannot stand (air) draft, while young most hate army draft. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 04:45 AM
Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"

Perhaps this has something to do with their fear of drafts.

Ha ha ha, red light means the draft barricade isn`t up yet. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Actually, I have the opposite experience since I've been here. I do not cross on a red light. I feel much more relaxed when following the rules. It's genetic.

But, when you refer to the younger people here, in cities, yes, they are all trying to be like what they see on MTV. They have no regard for rules and they often tend to make aschlochs of themselves. I'm far from impressed with Germany's youth.

Then again, my father (German) was old school and strict.

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 04:47 AM
Originally posted by MB_Avro_UK:
PJ...

I have sent a Paramedic and a Doctor on an emergency mission to give you some treatment... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Best Regards,
MB_Avro.

Make sure they have mittens. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

There`s a slight draft lurking today. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 04:55 AM
Originally posted by Boandlgramer:

Pirsch,
Wenn hier ein Sturm oder heftiger Wind geht, gehe ich sehr gerne spazieren mit meiner Schwiegermutter zum Drachen steigen. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif



http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Ich mag wind und regnet. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 05:00 AM
Originally posted by Abbuzze:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"


There is maybe an easy explantion for this.
It´s an unwritten rule, if childs are close don´t walk by red light. As an adult you are able to recoginze if no car is there or far away but an 8 year old child is not able to do this.
In the night or if no child are close all persons I know will walk at red light http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That makes sense and now that you mention it, at night the lights seem to have little meaning.They are rather pretty though. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I once heard a Canadian say that she thought it wasn't right that many Germans make the women sit in the back of the car when there are two couples inside. There is a good reason though. The back seat it safer in the event of an accident. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 05:01 AM
Originally posted by KIMURA:
But on the other hand the Germans don't use things like:

"use haldheld on stairs", "slippery when wet" plaques after cleaning up of the floor and other crazy things. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

Handrails are dirty.

"Wet floor" signs everywhere. I think its an industry. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Sturm_Williger
03-28-2006, 05:38 AM
There might just be something to the "it's Genetic" theory.

Despite growing up in South Africa, I hate heat. Anything over about 22 degrees makes me feel like death is imminent.

But I'm half Scottish ... and obviously I'm genetically engineered for cold weather. Having moved to Scotland, it's a pleasure not to be the only one wearing short sleeves at 10 degrees http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

But my paternal grandmother was German ... and SHE had a thing about drafts...

OldMan____
03-28-2006, 05:59 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Abbuzze:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by mandrill7:
I was in Germany for a couple of days last Fall and it immediately struck me how different they are to Canadians. (Yes, I'm a Canuck). My biggest discovery was that Germans WILL NOT cross roads against a red light (jaywalking). A half-dozen times, I happily sauntered across totally car-free streets against a red light, feeling justified in my North American economical use of time. But the bystanding Germans appeared completely shocked by my behaviour. On one occasion, a pleasant German guy I'd been talking to a couple of seconds before, called after me "Please don't do that!"


There is maybe an easy explantion for this.
It´s an unwritten rule, if childs are close don´t walk by red light. As an adult you are able to recoginze if no car is there or far away but an 8 year old child is not able to do this.
In the night or if no child are close all persons I know will walk at red light http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

That makes sense and now that you mention it, at night the lights seem to have little meaning.They are rather pretty though. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I once heard a Canadian say that she thought it wasn't right that many Germans make the women sit in the back of the car when there are two couples inside. There is a good reason though. The back seat it safer in the event of an accident. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

lol, here In Brasil the lights are shut off at midnight since no one will pay attention to them anyway. And they are reactivated at 6 a.m.

But this last observation is falacious. If you are worried about accidents you should enjoy life as much as you can before something happens, and 2 men in front 2 woman in back is not the best way of doing so.

djetz
03-28-2006, 06:15 AM
I am once again amazed.

You can work a computer, you can handle a fairly complex flight sim, yet you actually believe colds are caused by... drafts?

Colds are caused by a virus. Being hot, cold, barefoot, or anything else has nothing to do with it. You can wander naked through Siberia all night and you'll never catch a cold if you aren't exposed to the cold virus. You'll die of hypothermia, certainly, but you won't have a cold when it happens.

I haven't had a cold in years, because no matter how chilly I get, no matter how damp I get, I stay the heck away from people with colds. I don't handle things they've handled, and I keep my distance. That's all. I have not had a cold or the flu in about a decade.

So, to avoid colds, you're much better off with a window open, because breathing in other people's breath in an enclosed environment is the best way to catch a cold.

ploughman
03-28-2006, 06:35 AM
Foreign folks sure are funny.

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 08:25 AM
Originally posted by djetz:
I am once again amazed.

You can work a computer, you can handle a fairly complex flight sim, yet you actually believe colds are caused by... drafts?

Colds are caused by a virus. Being hot, cold, barefoot, or anything else has nothing to do with it. You can wander naked through Siberia all night and you'll never catch a cold if you aren't exposed to the cold virus. You'll die of hypothermia, certainly, but you won't have a cold when it happens.

I haven't had a cold in years, because no matter how chilly I get, no matter how damp I get, I stay the heck away from people with colds. I don't handle things they've handled, and I keep my distance. That's all. I have not had a cold or the flu in about a decade.

So, to avoid colds, you're much better off with a window open, because breathing in other people's breath in an enclosed environment is the best way to catch a cold.

I always say the same thing but no one seems to get it. They ask "Why then do we get colds and flus more commonly in winter?".

The answer is simple; they take time to spread from southern China to here.

But people just don't get it. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

HuninMunin
03-28-2006, 08:31 AM
Flues are caused by virus.

COLDS are caused by draft. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 08:33 AM
Originally posted by HuninMunin:
COLDS are caused by draft. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/halo.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/shady.gif

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

F19_Orheim
03-28-2006, 08:35 AM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Foreign folks sure are funny.

yes you are http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Pirschjaeger
03-28-2006, 08:41 AM
It's true Ploughman, you are a funny foreignor. We weren't going to tell you until you got older.http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

OldMan____
03-28-2006, 08:50 AM
You can get a cold because of cold air. Specially if you have some breathing problem like bronchitis and other problems of same family. An abrupt change on air temperature cause a uncontroled reaction by imunologic system on certain areas of breathing system and you get what is called a COLD.

ploughman
03-28-2006, 09:30 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
It's true Ploughman, you are a funny foreignor. We weren't going to tell you until you got older.http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif

You foreigners, you crack me up!

Funnilly enough, in my bit of foreign, open windows in the depths of winter, howling gales etc., are considered hearty and healthy. Back when folk were routinely felled by TB every other hill or exposed prominantry would have a sanatorium on it and the poor dying patients would be wheeled out onto verandas and balconies in all seasons to enjoy a stiff breeze/force 10 gale. It's not recorded how many sucumbed to hypothermia or simply lost the will to live. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Bremspropeller
03-28-2006, 09:51 AM
Also, german microvave-ovens never had notices like "don't dry your pets in here..:" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif

F19_Orheim
03-28-2006, 10:15 AM
or....


-- A scooter with the warning "This product moves when used."

-- A digital thermometer with the advice "Once used rectally, the thermometer should not be used orally."

-- An electric blender used for chopping and dicing that reminds users to " "Never remove food or other items from the blades while the product is operating."

-- And a three-inch bag of air used for packaging that read "Do not use this product as a toy, pillow, or flotation device."

djetz
03-28-2006, 10:27 AM
Originally posted by OldMan____:
You can get a cold because of cold air. Specially if you have some breathing problem like bronchitis and other problems of same family. An abrupt change on air temperature cause a uncontroled reaction by imunologic system on certain areas of breathing system and you get what is called a COLD.

Nonsense.

The only way to catch cold is to be infected by the cold virus.

Here's an article (http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20030317/ai_n10850727) that describes various medical experiments that disprove the myth you are propounding.

Here is the entry on Respiratory Viral Diseases (http://www.merck.com/mrkshared/mmanual/section13/chapter162/162b.jsp) from The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, one of the net's best resources on disease. It has a lot more scientific jargon than the first link, but it says much the same thing.

If the science is a little too hard for you, then try this page (http://www.commoncold.org/special1.htm) on the Myths of the Common Cold. It's written in a nice and simple way. I could spend the rest of the day posting more links, but hopefully by now you will get the general idea.

OldMan____
03-28-2006, 10:33 AM
Originally posted by djetz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by OldMan____:
You can get a cold because of cold air. Specially if you have some breathing problem like bronchitis and other problems of same family. An abrupt change on air temperature cause a uncontroled reaction by imunologic system on certain areas of breathing system and you get what is called a COLD.

Nonsense.

The only way to catch cold is to be infected by the cold virus.

Here's an article (http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qn4196/is_20030317/ai_n10850727) that describes various medical experiments that disprove the myth you are propounding.

Here is the entry on Respiratory Viral Diseases (http://www.merck.com/mrkshared/mmanual/section13/chapter162/162b.jsp) from The Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy, one of the net's best resources on disease. It has a lot more scientific jargon than the first link, but it says much the same thing.

If the science is a little too hard for you, then try this page (http://www.commoncold.org/special1.htm) on the Myths of the Common Cold. It's written in a nice and simple way. I could spend the rest of the day posting more links, but hopefully by now you will get the general idea. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Flu and cold are different things. a Cold is when your imunologic system get screwed and you have side effect infections in your breath system, might be from the Flu virus , from bacteria or several others. (I have cronical condition and have been hospitalized several times, I know what is is). The Flu is the disease caused by the virus, and you will develop it when exposed , does not matter if your imunologic system is OK or not. We are now facing a n asiatic FLU pandemic, not a cold pandemic because this doe snot exist!

blakduk
03-28-2006, 03:16 PM
People sure are funny http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif
The reason we tend to get more colds and flu's in winter is usually attributed to the fact that-
- in colder weather people tend to gather closer together indoors, thus aiding the spread of the virus
- in darker weather and with shorter days in winter, our immune system is less robust and our metabolism is generally slower
- historically our diets are generally less abundant with citrus fruits etc (this is less of a factor in most western nations these days)
As for the lag time of the influenza virus mutating in Asia then spreading to the rest of the world in time for the winter- this may be true of the northern hemisphere but 'flu season' still strikes in the southern hemisphere winter.
As for cold air causing colds- no it does not. However, cold air tends to dry out the mucosa of the larynx and pharynx. This will usually lead to the initial symptoms of a sore throat. It also tends to make the mucosa more susceptible to invasion by bacteria and viruses- the mucous forms a protective barrier.
This why people who sleep with airconditioners on tend to catch colds- the AC really dehumidifies the air. People who are particularly vulnerable to sore throats are often advised to use a humidifier in their bedroom to assist with this.
Our bodies reaction to an invasion by a cold virus is to kill it by increasing the temperature where the virus is thriving, the nasal cavity. It does this by increasing mucous production and raising our body temperature slightly- this raises the temperature in the nose by a few degrees and eventually kills the virus. Unfortunately it also makes us feel miserable http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif. Our bodies also swamp the area with white-blood cells that kill the virus- as some of them are killed they produce the green stuff that makes colds so much fun http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif
The flu virus is different- it generally attacks our bodies much more diffusely. Our reaction is therefore more extreme- our body temp is raised significantly and our energies are devoted to producing white-cells. The inflamation reaction occurs throughout our bodies thus we have the generalised aches and pains.
Complications can occur if sinuses get blocked, or too much mucous is produced the lungs etc. This leads to the possibility of secondary infection by bacteria- hence often doctors will prescribe antibiotics for a flu if you have copious amounts of green stuff coming out of your lungs or nose. The antibiotics wont cure the virus, but they will get rid of the secondary infection and allow your body to continue fighting the original infective agent.

As for the sanitoriums during the 'white death' epidemics of TB- the main cause of death was plurosy (infection of the lining of the lung, VERY painful). The only treatment was bed rest (before the discover of antibiotics), good food, and sunshine. The belief was the 'clean' air would help 'air out' the damaged lungs and allow them to heal. This generally helped but was no panacea. Considering the housing most people endured during these outbreaks it was certainly helpful to have them away from close contact with others. The slum housing of major cities was/is an appalling incubator for this illness.

pourshot
03-28-2006, 03:41 PM
Originally posted by JtD:

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BSS_Goat
What about motorcycles?

If you see Germans on motorbikes you will find they carry full leather suit and a closed helmet. This is to protect from drafts. As a sideffect, it also helps to protect the rider from accidents. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The closed helmet is to stop gigantic bugs or stones from denting your face in while you€re cruising along at warp speed, it€s better to use the chin vent for air circulation.

I once got hit by a bug that was so HUGE it€s bug custard covered 1/3 of my visor and I had to stop too clean it off, I have also had visors smashed by small stones.

LStarosta
03-28-2006, 05:50 PM
I regularly run outside in temperatures that range from 10 degrees fahreheit to 30 degrees fahrenheit during the winter. Astonishingly, I get sick less often during these cold months. Actually, I get sick most often when the temperature rises above freezing to anywhere from 40-50 degrees fahrenheit. Is it possible that the extreme cold kills the virus while a sudden warm-up and additional humidity caused by melting snow might provide a large-scale petri dish for these microscopic disease-causing organisms to procreate?

blakduk
03-28-2006, 07:04 PM
Originally posted by LStarosta:
I regularly run outside in temperatures that range from 10 degrees fahreheit to 30 degrees fahrenheit during the winter. Astonishingly, I get sick less often during these cold months. Actually, I get sick most often when the temperature rises above freezing to anywhere from 40-50 degrees fahrenheit. Is it possible that the extreme cold kills the virus while a sudden warm-up and additional humidity caused by melting snow might provide a large-scale petri dish for these microscopic disease-causing organisms to procreate?

It depends a lot on the environment you're in and your lifestyle. The viruses that cause the common cold (rhinoviruses) survive very well outside the body, even when it gets below freezing. A lot of viruses are quite robust but they need the opportunity to get into susceptible cells- most are stopped by barriers such as skin or mucous, others will be immediately killed by our immune system. If you get exposed to enough of the stuff it will get through these barriers and, if you haven't been exposed to that particular strain before, it will make you sick.
It could be that at times when you're running outside you are not being exposed enough to the right pathogens to cause the illness. As the snow melts people often start to move about more but still tend to remain inside a lot. When you are no longer exercising outside you may be around more infected people (eg at pubs or school). Maybe you need friends who are less diseased http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif
Another factor could be fitness- when doing light training your immunity is boosted. If you train very hard and get too tired your immune system will start to suffer. Elite athletes have to be very careful as they can get sick very easily.

LEBillfish
03-28-2006, 10:38 PM
Odd, I never heard all this though I've met many Germans. Makes me wonder if I drove them insane with my tastes.......I never wear shoes if I can help it even in the snow (except when I'll be out in it for hours hunting)....Drafts are a nature of the beast for me riding my FatBoy, or in one of the many convertables of my husbands.....In fact drafty is the way I prefer it wearing loose cutoff bibs or summer dresses "commando" style even in the winter....and lastly even on the coldest of nights I MUST have the window open and will cover up under the blankets with only my nose and mouth exposed as I must have a cold draft past them (summer is tough as I hate air conditioning).

Must be the native american in me needing all the fresh air..... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-indifferent.gif

ploughman
03-29-2006, 02:13 AM
Originally posted by pourshot:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by JtD:

<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BSS_Goat
What about motorcycles?

If you see Germans on motorbikes you will find they carry full leather suit and a closed helmet. This is to protect from drafts. As a sideffect, it also helps to protect the rider from accidents. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The closed helmet is to stop gigantic bugs or stones from denting your face in while you€re cruising along at warp speed, it€s better to use the chin vent for air circulation.

I once got hit by a bug that was so HUGE it€s bug custard covered 1/3 of my visor and I had to stop too clean it off, I have also had visors smashed by small stones. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

True that, the number of people I've heard of getting a raven to the face whilst going super-luminal...very bad business.

I was once cycling down a hill in Scotland and got a bee in the eye, apart from the instanteous agony and shock that almost landed me through a tree the impacted eye took a couple of days to recover. Kidz, wear eye protection if you're going outside as it is dangerous out there.

Petey78
04-06-2006, 11:24 PM
My ex-girlfriend is German and she used to insist that the bedroom window was left open all the time, she said it was stuffy otherwise, even when it was -4 outside. Strangely enough I hated it at first but in the end got used to it, now I keep the window open! It's an odd world when somebody is taught to be a Yorkshireman by a German!

Pete