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View Full Version : Coolest night ever on a DF server (long)



Unknown_Target
10-02-2006, 05:48 PM
Sorry, I just had to tell this somewhere. My squad had arranged a server raid, and I joined somewhat late. By the time I got in, though, things were starting to get good http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. In the particular server that we were in (it was full real), it was late war US/UK vs. late war Germany, so we had three B-25 pilots, one Lightning pilot, one Tempest Mk. V pilot, and myself, driving my P-51D. Sorry that the writing isn't the best.

---

The field was quite crowded - planes of all sorts were moving onto the runway to take off as fast as they could. As I was sitting in my cockpit and listening to my squadmate's chatter, I noticed a lot of Tempests - which I thought was odd because I usually see more Spitfire Mk IX25lbs. on online DF servers. I ran up my engine, test fired my guns (to get the animation and sounds into my RAM), and taxiid out onto the runway. I had to watch out for other aircraft, as the parking ramp was blocked off by sandbags, forcing everyone to funnel to the end of the runway.

After entering the runway and informing the CO that I was taking off, I locked my tail wheel, lowered flaps and slammed the throttle full forward. The Mustang skittered back and forth across the runway, it's powerful engine roaring in my headset as I gently lifted it off the ground and retracted the gear, and after a few seconds, the flaps. I was now airborne, and listening for what to do next. My CO came on the comms and instructed everyone to turn on their nav lights so that we could form up.

I was just heading upwind, parallel to the runway, when the three B-25's lights flared into being about a mile away, just over the airfield. They were already in formation, and just in front of me, the CO and his P-38 began their approach. I locked in behind him and saddled up next door, trying to reign in my mount before I overshot the twin engined fighter. Unfortunately, I failed, and ended up weaving and dodging above the flight below.

By now the Tempest had caught up to us and had taken station about 500 feet to the aft of the bombers. A second Lightning had latched onto my CO and stayed glued to his tail the whole flight, however, he was neither part of the squad nor on comms. Apparantly he just had an itching for a raid http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

With the bombers navigating, we set off, climbing to about 19,000 feet. I was the highest, weaving above the procession and watching them through my digital canopy. Out in the distance I saw a black dot approaching and turned to investigate, only to break off when I learned that it was in fact just a Spitfire. We flew on for about five minutes, the comms broken only by the bomber pilots relaying data amongst themselves, or the fighter pilots calling out possible bandits. At the end of the five minutes, however, I spied a new black dot, coming in from the 12 and moving to the nine o clock. Calling it in I turned to investigate, calling the Tempest pilot in to help me out. The P-38s were laden with ground attack armarments and thus stayed on course with the bombers. The black dot drew closer and closer - the wings looked a little funny, and I called in a suspected bandit closing in to the six or seven of the bombers. The Tempest pilot, who was lower, was the first to intercept the enemy - I saw gunfire go off as the two passed each other at high speed, and two aircraft split off into opposite directions, the bandit heading towards the bombers, the Tempest pulling around hard to get back behind the target. I dove on the enemy, grabbing onto his tail and zeroing my guns - it turned out to be a 109, and it looked like the Tempest had made some pretty large holes in its port wing. I had just started to fire when my wingman (the Tempest) zoomed in from above and saddled into the guy's rear with the full brunt of his heavy-caliber cannon. However, as soon as he opened fire, the enemy aircraft veered off to the left, and my wingman lagged out for a split second, allowing him to escape. I broke off of covering him and switched to the 109, once again zeroing my six fifties and letting loose from about 150 m and closing. Immediately I was granted with bright strikes all across his fuselage and wings, and a sudden, thick black smoke bursting from his engine. A server message indicated that I had knocked out his control surfaces and I veered away, letting my wingman back into him. He tried to fire but missed, and decided to conserve the rest of his ammo as the Messchersmicht drifted into a lazy spiral. Soon after the Tempest broke off, the 109 dissappeared and I got a kill confirmation.

By now the bombers were just lining up their target for the drop - the flak was lancing up from the ground, exploding all around as the bright blue and red tracers zipped around the fragile birds. My plane was buffetted more than once by a near miss as I sped to the assistance of the bombers, my wingman close behind. The P-38s were going for ground targets - I hadn't seen anything of them since I broke off to attack the 109.
We cleared the flak zone a few seconds after the bombers, who were already lining up on a course for home. Suddenly, a new black speck appeared a little below me, and rising fast. Calling it out, I told the bombers I was breaking to attack and took my wingman down on the enemy target. As we neared, he turned up into us, heading straight at me. I knew my fifties wouldn't stand a chance against the heavy firepower of the enemy aircraft, so I dove underneath it, the belly of what I now realized was a 190 zooming by a mere ten feet above my aircraft. My wingman in the Tempest was not so lucky, however, as the 190 had switched targets from me to my tailer and had let loose with a full volley right into him, ripping him apart. Banking around, I saw that all that remained of my compatriot was several flaming chunks of debris.
Banking around in a hard turn, I saw the 190 had made his first and last mistake. Rather than pressing the attack against me, he had instead opted to target the bombers, apparantly forgetting all about me. I heard the bombers frantically calling for assistance, that an enemy was approaching. I radioed back that I had him, closing in tight and using my superior speed to draw up close to the 190 - there was a split second of confusion when the bombers thought there was two bandits instead of one, but luckily I assured them of my intentions just in time. Pulling to about 200 m/600 ft, I let loose on the 190, again seeing the satisfactory strike marks flaming into life all across his wingspread. He broke hard to the left and I followed, lining up another gunshot. I saw a piece of debris fall and held my fire - soon enough, the pilot followed a few seconds after. I got another kill score, and hurried to catch up to the bombers. Spotting a few targets, I called them out and investigated, only to find that they were a few straggling Spitfires that had tagged along or were in the area.
Banking slightly to my left, still about a mile and a half behind the bombers, I spied a plume of flame near the ground. Calling out, I asked if anyone had shot something down - I got no response. Again, I called out, and was met with no response. Suddenly, I realized what was going on - that was no downed aircraft, that was a Komet! I called out to the bombers the new threat - the Komet streaked up past them a split second after. I saw the plume streak some five hundred feet above them, gently curving in an apex...then slamming straight down on the unescorted bombers, ripping past them, guns blazing. The whole process took only a few seconds, but when the smoke cleared I almost cheered with satisfaction as I saw two black dots emerge from the Komet's plume - as far as I could tell, a bomber gunner had shot the wing off the little devil and sent him spinning to Earth!
I finally was able to catch up to the bombers by now (cavalry is always late, eh? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif), and my CO came back on the comms. He was flying low about five miles to our six o clock, and his wingman had apparantly been shot down. He didn't radio any damage, and I told him that I'd keep an eye on him.
The flight home was mostly uneventful until the last three minutes or so. Something happened with the third bomber and it stalled out to the ground - I never found out what happened with that. All I saw was him break off hard to the right, enter a flat spin, and go down without any apparanty sign of attempted recovery.

Now the real bit of fun began. There I was at 10,000 feet, about five miles to the South of the airfield, when suddenly...my engine coughs and sputters - and I remember I only set my fuel tank to 50%! That's fine for short range dogfights, but I had forgot to set it for a long range escort, and all the full-throttle combat had strangled my already tight fuel reserve! I tried to start the engine again, but no luck. It kicked in for a few seconds but sputtered out. Now I had to dead stick five miles of terrain and ten thousand feet of altitude, with a crowded runway to meet me. I immediately radioed all the people on comms that I had an emergency and had to put down right away, and I repeated the statement in the chat box. Lining up with the tarmac as best I could, I raised the nose and lowered the flaps to kill some of the excess speed. No time to look at my guages, and the server didn't have a speed bar enabled. Three miles, what looked like 3,000 feet. I was still coming in too fast - I dropped the gear and put the aircraft into a sideslip, bleeding off my speed as my aircraft was kicked around by the windmilling prop. Two miles, 1,000 feet. Perfect - but the runway I had lined up on had people taking off! Switching as quick as I could to the other one, I lined up for a perfect touchdown aaand...bingo! Wheels hit the dirt, straight and level, raise the nose, flaps up, apply brakes! I rolled off the runway to clear it and signaled the all-clear on the comms. A mission well done! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


Let me tell you - this sim can get pretty freaking immersive http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Unknown_Target
10-02-2006, 05:48 PM
Sorry, I just had to tell this somewhere. My squad had arranged a server raid, and I joined somewhat late. By the time I got in, though, things were starting to get good http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif. In the particular server that we were in (it was full real), it was late war US/UK vs. late war Germany, so we had three B-25 pilots, one Lightning pilot, one Tempest Mk. V pilot, and myself, driving my P-51D. Sorry that the writing isn't the best.

---

The field was quite crowded - planes of all sorts were moving onto the runway to take off as fast as they could. As I was sitting in my cockpit and listening to my squadmate's chatter, I noticed a lot of Tempests - which I thought was odd because I usually see more Spitfire Mk IX25lbs. on online DF servers. I ran up my engine, test fired my guns (to get the animation and sounds into my RAM), and taxiid out onto the runway. I had to watch out for other aircraft, as the parking ramp was blocked off by sandbags, forcing everyone to funnel to the end of the runway.

After entering the runway and informing the CO that I was taking off, I locked my tail wheel, lowered flaps and slammed the throttle full forward. The Mustang skittered back and forth across the runway, it's powerful engine roaring in my headset as I gently lifted it off the ground and retracted the gear, and after a few seconds, the flaps. I was now airborne, and listening for what to do next. My CO came on the comms and instructed everyone to turn on their nav lights so that we could form up.

I was just heading upwind, parallel to the runway, when the three B-25's lights flared into being about a mile away, just over the airfield. They were already in formation, and just in front of me, the CO and his P-38 began their approach. I locked in behind him and saddled up next door, trying to reign in my mount before I overshot the twin engined fighter. Unfortunately, I failed, and ended up weaving and dodging above the flight below.

By now the Tempest had caught up to us and had taken station about 500 feet to the aft of the bombers. A second Lightning had latched onto my CO and stayed glued to his tail the whole flight, however, he was neither part of the squad nor on comms. Apparantly he just had an itching for a raid http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

With the bombers navigating, we set off, climbing to about 19,000 feet. I was the highest, weaving above the procession and watching them through my digital canopy. Out in the distance I saw a black dot approaching and turned to investigate, only to break off when I learned that it was in fact just a Spitfire. We flew on for about five minutes, the comms broken only by the bomber pilots relaying data amongst themselves, or the fighter pilots calling out possible bandits. At the end of the five minutes, however, I spied a new black dot, coming in from the 12 and moving to the nine o clock. Calling it in I turned to investigate, calling the Tempest pilot in to help me out. The P-38s were laden with ground attack armarments and thus stayed on course with the bombers. The black dot drew closer and closer - the wings looked a little funny, and I called in a suspected bandit closing in to the six or seven of the bombers. The Tempest pilot, who was lower, was the first to intercept the enemy - I saw gunfire go off as the two passed each other at high speed, and two aircraft split off into opposite directions, the bandit heading towards the bombers, the Tempest pulling around hard to get back behind the target. I dove on the enemy, grabbing onto his tail and zeroing my guns - it turned out to be a 109, and it looked like the Tempest had made some pretty large holes in its port wing. I had just started to fire when my wingman (the Tempest) zoomed in from above and saddled into the guy's rear with the full brunt of his heavy-caliber cannon. However, as soon as he opened fire, the enemy aircraft veered off to the left, and my wingman lagged out for a split second, allowing him to escape. I broke off of covering him and switched to the 109, once again zeroing my six fifties and letting loose from about 150 m and closing. Immediately I was granted with bright strikes all across his fuselage and wings, and a sudden, thick black smoke bursting from his engine. A server message indicated that I had knocked out his control surfaces and I veered away, letting my wingman back into him. He tried to fire but missed, and decided to conserve the rest of his ammo as the Messchersmicht drifted into a lazy spiral. Soon after the Tempest broke off, the 109 dissappeared and I got a kill confirmation.

By now the bombers were just lining up their target for the drop - the flak was lancing up from the ground, exploding all around as the bright blue and red tracers zipped around the fragile birds. My plane was buffetted more than once by a near miss as I sped to the assistance of the bombers, my wingman close behind. The P-38s were going for ground targets - I hadn't seen anything of them since I broke off to attack the 109.
We cleared the flak zone a few seconds after the bombers, who were already lining up on a course for home. Suddenly, a new black speck appeared a little below me, and rising fast. Calling it out, I told the bombers I was breaking to attack and took my wingman down on the enemy target. As we neared, he turned up into us, heading straight at me. I knew my fifties wouldn't stand a chance against the heavy firepower of the enemy aircraft, so I dove underneath it, the belly of what I now realized was a 190 zooming by a mere ten feet above my aircraft. My wingman in the Tempest was not so lucky, however, as the 190 had switched targets from me to my tailer and had let loose with a full volley right into him, ripping him apart. Banking around, I saw that all that remained of my compatriot was several flaming chunks of debris.
Banking around in a hard turn, I saw the 190 had made his first and last mistake. Rather than pressing the attack against me, he had instead opted to target the bombers, apparantly forgetting all about me. I heard the bombers frantically calling for assistance, that an enemy was approaching. I radioed back that I had him, closing in tight and using my superior speed to draw up close to the 190 - there was a split second of confusion when the bombers thought there was two bandits instead of one, but luckily I assured them of my intentions just in time. Pulling to about 200 m/600 ft, I let loose on the 190, again seeing the satisfactory strike marks flaming into life all across his wingspread. He broke hard to the left and I followed, lining up another gunshot. I saw a piece of debris fall and held my fire - soon enough, the pilot followed a few seconds after. I got another kill score, and hurried to catch up to the bombers. Spotting a few targets, I called them out and investigated, only to find that they were a few straggling Spitfires that had tagged along or were in the area.
Banking slightly to my left, still about a mile and a half behind the bombers, I spied a plume of flame near the ground. Calling out, I asked if anyone had shot something down - I got no response. Again, I called out, and was met with no response. Suddenly, I realized what was going on - that was no downed aircraft, that was a Komet! I called out to the bombers the new threat - the Komet streaked up past them a split second after. I saw the plume streak some five hundred feet above them, gently curving in an apex...then slamming straight down on the unescorted bombers, ripping past them, guns blazing. The whole process took only a few seconds, but when the smoke cleared I almost cheered with satisfaction as I saw two black dots emerge from the Komet's plume - as far as I could tell, a bomber gunner had shot the wing off the little devil and sent him spinning to Earth!
I finally was able to catch up to the bombers by now (cavalry is always late, eh? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif), and my CO came back on the comms. He was flying low about five miles to our six o clock, and his wingman had apparantly been shot down. He didn't radio any damage, and I told him that I'd keep an eye on him.
The flight home was mostly uneventful until the last three minutes or so. Something happened with the third bomber and it stalled out to the ground - I never found out what happened with that. All I saw was him break off hard to the right, enter a flat spin, and go down without any apparanty sign of attempted recovery.

Now the real bit of fun began. There I was at 10,000 feet, about five miles to the South of the airfield, when suddenly...my engine coughs and sputters - and I remember I only set my fuel tank to 50%! That's fine for short range dogfights, but I had forgot to set it for a long range escort, and all the full-throttle combat had strangled my already tight fuel reserve! I tried to start the engine again, but no luck. It kicked in for a few seconds but sputtered out. Now I had to dead stick five miles of terrain and ten thousand feet of altitude, with a crowded runway to meet me. I immediately radioed all the people on comms that I had an emergency and had to put down right away, and I repeated the statement in the chat box. Lining up with the tarmac as best I could, I raised the nose and lowered the flaps to kill some of the excess speed. No time to look at my guages, and the server didn't have a speed bar enabled. Three miles, what looked like 3,000 feet. I was still coming in too fast - I dropped the gear and put the aircraft into a sideslip, bleeding off my speed as my aircraft was kicked around by the windmilling prop. Two miles, 1,000 feet. Perfect - but the runway I had lined up on had people taking off! Switching as quick as I could to the other one, I lined up for a perfect touchdown aaand...bingo! Wheels hit the dirt, straight and level, raise the nose, flaps up, apply brakes! I rolled off the runway to clear it and signaled the all-clear on the comms. A mission well done! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif


Let me tell you - this sim can get pretty freaking immersive http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

Woof603
10-02-2006, 06:24 PM
Now that sounds like fun. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Siwarrior
10-03-2006, 04:32 AM
Sounds like fun http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif
Great read mate http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif