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View Full Version : There I was cutting a lime...



roybaty
02-20-2008, 05:08 PM
...for a Gin and Tonic and a question came to me.

Why are Brits called (somewhat derogatorily) as "Limeys", off the top of my head I would think it has something to do with the White Cliffs of Dover.

berg417448
02-20-2008, 05:09 PM
http://ask.yahoo.com/20041027.html

leitmotiv
02-20-2008, 05:09 PM
Remember scurvy?

roybaty
02-20-2008, 05:10 PM
Ahhh yes http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif

I intentionally didn't look it up, sad thing is I knew this is the back of my mind, once I saw the scurvy reference http://www.v11lemans.com/forums/style_emoticons/default/homer.gif

Low_Flyer_MkIX
02-20-2008, 05:32 PM
Makes a nice change from the 'B' word. I hate the 'B' word, I really do.

ploughman
02-20-2008, 05:39 PM
Beetroot? Gets my goat RIGHT up also.

Low_Flyer_MkIX
02-20-2008, 05:44 PM
Well I do have unpleasant and until very recently suppressed unhappy memories of beetroot, but no, the 'B' word I was thinking of rhymes with 'grit'.

roybaty
02-20-2008, 05:45 PM
Well the Cliffs of Dover contain lime/chalk so I don't feel like a complete idiot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif.

LEBillfish
02-20-2008, 07:43 PM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkIX:
Well I do have unpleasant and until very recently suppressed unhappy memories of beetroot, but no, the 'B' word I was thinking of rhymes with 'grit'.

Don't feel bad low flyer, I have to keep telling everyone witch is not spelled with a B too. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

HotelBushranger
02-20-2008, 09:40 PM
Originally posted by Ploughman:
Beetroot? Gets my goat RIGHT up also.

Ey? Never heard of the beetroot term before http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Btw I love beetroot http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif Best ever filler for a burger!

MEGILE
02-21-2008, 01:56 AM
Ascorbic Acid ftw.

Pirschjaeger
02-21-2008, 02:26 AM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkIX:
Well I do have unpleasant and until very recently suppressed unhappy memories of beetroot, but no, the 'B' word I was thinking of rhymes with 'grit'.

bit? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Feathered_IV
02-21-2008, 02:50 AM
Originally posted by Low_Flyer_MkIX:
Makes a nice change from the 'B' word. I hate the 'B' word, I really do.

Bleedin?

flyingloon
02-21-2008, 07:04 AM
bast... no bug... no ooooo

Copperhead311th
02-21-2008, 08:14 AM
i always thought it was a term used only by the Brittish to describe them selvs.

i still don't kno WTH a "W@nker is or why
the word "Bloody" is profain. All i know is a kid down the road i went to grade school with, his mom was from the UK and Bloody was never to be said alowed. which i always thought as rather odd.

and where the hell in England do those ppl live that talk so poor you can't even understand them. i'm not talking about the "normal" PROPER English accent....like on tv & in movies. but the diry grungie kind.
there's a word for it but i don't rember what it is.

Low_Flyer_MkIX
02-21-2008, 08:23 AM
That would probably be 'chav', innit?

I must update the G.I. guide to Great Britain tonight, some of it still holds true...
http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/2601013236/m/2671017436

OMK_Hand
02-22-2008, 11:40 AM
The collective noun for chavs is "Bollux", as in:

"A bollux of chavs"

ImpStarDuece
02-23-2008, 12:46 AM
Originally posted by Copperhead311th:
i always thought it was a term used only by the Brittish to describe them selvs.

i still don't kno WTH a "W@nker is or why
the word "Bloody" is profain. All i know is a kid down the road i went to grade school with, his mom was from the UK and Bloody was never to be said alowed. which i always thought as rather odd.

and where the hell in England do those ppl live that talk so poor you can't even understand them. i'm not talking about the "normal" PROPER English accent....like on tv & in movies. but the diry grungie kind.
there's a word for it but i don't rember what it is.

Speaking as an Aussie:

W@nking is the act of masturbation.

A 'W@nker' is someone who either has
A) an excessively high opinion of themselves, also interchangable with 'tosser'(which also refers to masturbation) i.e "That w@nker is so full of himself" or "He's ok, but sometimes he can be a bit of a tosser", or;
B) Someone of low moral character and conviction, or someone who has performed a deed of low moral character i.e "What a ******, I can't believe he/she did..."
or
C) Your best mate (all Australians use insults as terms of endearment) i.e "G'Day you bl00dy w@nker, I haven't seen you in ages"

The term is generally used by males to describe males, although its not uncommon to hear the term used by women. Increasing females are falling under the auspicises of the term,particularly the "ladette", ie a tomboy who generally tries to 'out ocker' her male counterparts by drinking, swearing and generally misbehaving - or acting like a bit of a w@nker

Bl00dy as a swear word has two origins that I know of

The first is that the term is a conraction of 'By Our Lady', which was considered highly blasphemous in English.

The second is that it is a reference to the spilling of the blood of Jesus on the cross, again blasphemy in the eyes of the Church at the time. Shakespear quite often used the swearwords "S'blood" ( a contraction of "God's Blood") and "S'wounds" (a contraction of "God's Wounds) in his plays. Even contracted as they were, these terms considered so outrageous that at many performances of his plays the director and/or actors chose not to say the word, usually substituting something a little more gentle. Like saying 'frick' instead of 'f_ck'.

Oh, and the accent your referring to is known as 'Cockney'

Messaschnitzel
02-23-2008, 01:58 AM
A co-worker told me a funny incident involving an Australian exchange student staying with his family. He said that they were sitting around the supper table, when his daughter leaned back after the meal and said, "Whew! I'm stuffed!" The Australian girl couldn't believe that the girl would say such a thing in front of her parents. They then went on to explain to each other what it meant in each other's countries. A few moments later, the Aussie girl said, "Oh, could one of you knock me up in the morning?" They then explained what THAT meant in each other's countries, as well. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif I remember asking him if that was a joke, but he told me that it really happened.

Messaschnitzel
02-23-2008, 02:04 AM
Bl00dy as a swear word has two origins that I know of

The first is that the term is a conraction of 'By Our Lady', which was considered highly blasphemous in English.

The second is that it is a reference to the spilling of the blood of Jesus on the cross, again blasphemy in the eyes of the Church at the time. Shakespear quite often used the swearwords "S'blood" ( a contraction of "God's Blood") and "S'wounds" (a contraction of "God's Wounds) in his plays. Even contracted as they were, these terms considered so outrageous that at many performances of his plays the director and/or actors chose not to say the word, usually substituting something a little more gentle. Like saying 'frick' instead of 'f_ck'.

Oh, and the accent your referring to is known as 'Cockney'[/QUOTE]

Also, the word "s'truth" is a contraction of the word "God's truth", and "Zounds", a variation to S'wounds", for "God's wounds".

DuxCorvan
02-23-2008, 03:11 AM
Piratical scum... http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-mad.gif

Low_Flyer_MkIX
02-23-2008, 06:35 AM
http://www.outpost221.com/images/pugwash/cpug.gif http://www.outpost221.com/images/pugwash/mmate.gif http://www.outpost221.com/images/pugwash/willy.gif http://www.outpost221.com/images/pugwash/barnab.gif

"Hullaballo hulay hulah hullaballoo hulay" http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-tongue.gif