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Waldo.Pepper
09-22-2005, 10:06 AM
Stuka Pilot Frenzel procedure.

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"I believe the least stressful, most effective way to clear the ears is the Frenzel procedure. This technique was utilized by German Stuka bomber pilots during WWII. At the time, the Stuka bomber attacks were the most precise form of bombing. The pilots would put their plane into a steep dive aimed directly towards the target. Just before crashing into the ground, the aircraft would release the bomb and pull out of the dive. The bomb would follow the launch trajectory and fall into the target. Because this was before the time of computer-aided hydraulics in aircraft, it was necessary for the pilot to use both hands on the control stick to physically pull out of the dive. Since the plane was undergoing rapid pressure changes, and both hands were required to be on the control stick, it was imperative that a hands-free, rapid, effective and safe method of clearing ears was used. The technique they used was developed in 1938 by a German physician named Herman Frenzel.

The Frenzel technique is done by placing the tongue on the roof of the mouth, as far forward as possible. While the tongue is held in place, the back of the tongue is gently moved upward. (Imagine driving the tongue through the back of your head. Obviously, you cannot do this, but striving to do so will move the tongue such that a gentle puff of air moves up the Eustachian tube to increase the pressure in the middle ear). Often a "click" sound is heard internally as the tongue is moved. This action does NOT constrict the Eustachian tubes, does NOT over-pressurize the middle or inner ear, and leaves the hands free. It is the safest, most effective way for divers to equalize the pressure in he middle ear. It does, however, take a bit pf practice to master. But, once mastered, it provides safe, effective and hands-free clearing. It is, in my opinion, the method of choice for divers to solve equalization problems."

From:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpt/ears.htm

Waldo.Pepper
09-22-2005, 10:06 AM
Stuka Pilot Frenzel procedure.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif


"I believe the least stressful, most effective way to clear the ears is the Frenzel procedure. This technique was utilized by German Stuka bomber pilots during WWII. At the time, the Stuka bomber attacks were the most precise form of bombing. The pilots would put their plane into a steep dive aimed directly towards the target. Just before crashing into the ground, the aircraft would release the bomb and pull out of the dive. The bomb would follow the launch trajectory and fall into the target. Because this was before the time of computer-aided hydraulics in aircraft, it was necessary for the pilot to use both hands on the control stick to physically pull out of the dive. Since the plane was undergoing rapid pressure changes, and both hands were required to be on the control stick, it was imperative that a hands-free, rapid, effective and safe method of clearing ears was used. The technique they used was developed in 1938 by a German physician named Herman Frenzel.

The Frenzel technique is done by placing the tongue on the roof of the mouth, as far forward as possible. While the tongue is held in place, the back of the tongue is gently moved upward. (Imagine driving the tongue through the back of your head. Obviously, you cannot do this, but striving to do so will move the tongue such that a gentle puff of air moves up the Eustachian tube to increase the pressure in the middle ear). Often a "click" sound is heard internally as the tongue is moved. This action does NOT constrict the Eustachian tubes, does NOT over-pressurize the middle or inner ear, and leaves the hands free. It is the safest, most effective way for divers to equalize the pressure in he middle ear. It does, however, take a bit pf practice to master. But, once mastered, it provides safe, effective and hands-free clearing. It is, in my opinion, the method of choice for divers to solve equalization problems."

From:

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpt/ears.htm

Paul_K
09-22-2005, 11:13 AM
Might be useful to know when I next fly in an unpressurized aircraft. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

p1ngu666
09-22-2005, 11:54 AM
u can do it by swallowing aswell?http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

EPP_Gibbs
09-22-2005, 12:31 PM
I've never had any ear/air pressure problems when diving in IL-2. The pressure in my living room seems to stay much the same whatever altitude I'm at.

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WB_Outlaw
09-22-2005, 05:39 PM
Even though Houston will now probably get the "easy" side of hurricane Rita, I may have to use this technique if a tornado attacks. I hear they have a wicked pressure drop.

BTW, if anyone wants to experience driving 12 miles in 8 hours (ending up back at home) with 7 cats (some rescued from Katrina) spread between 2 cars, grab a flight into Houston right now and then rent a car and try to drive out.

-Outlaw.

FritzGryphon
09-22-2005, 05:46 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I've never had any ear/air pressure problems when diving in IL-2. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You mean you don't have the Thrustmaster ear pumps? You can't do full real without them.

jamesdietz
09-23-2005, 11:36 AM
I find Yodling helps too!

EPP_Gibbs
09-23-2005, 01:54 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FritzGryphon:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">I've never had any ear/air pressure problems when diving in IL-2. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You mean you don't have the Thrustmaster ear pumps? You can't do full real without them. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Haven't tried them..Going to try a pair of Saitek rubber sink plungers and get my wife to stand behind me and work them when in a dive.

AOD_DieHard_X
09-23-2005, 05:18 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/34.gif
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by EPP_Gibbs:
I've never had any ear/air pressure problems when diving in IL-2. The pressure in my living room seems to stay much the same whatever altitude I'm at.

http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Platypus_1.JaVA
09-24-2005, 01:55 AM
Normal gaping works with me too. Just open up you shovel real wide works also.

Professor_06
09-24-2005, 03:29 AM
Does anyone know what happened to the Pacific Fighters forum? Where did it go?

triggerhappyfin
09-26-2005, 07:08 AM
Would´nt work for me.... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

I´d bite my tongue off...when wife comes into the room hitting me with the fryin pan in back of my head when finding me flying again... http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_redface.gif


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Cold_Gambler
09-26-2005, 11:21 AM
I fly with a lolly-pop in my mouth with a TIR reflective dot on the tip, controls the view and relieves air pressure at the same time...