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9th_Spitin
05-09-2005, 09:22 PM
Please list any WWII Pilots that you have met and any stories that go along with them.

PBNA-Boosher
05-09-2005, 09:32 PM
Lt. Gottfried Paul Johannes Dulias of III.JG53, a good friend of mine, actually. I'll post the notes I took at the seminar where I first met him later.

My grandfather: Staff Sgt. Ralph Pam- B-17 radio-man/gunner. Tours in New Guinea AND in Europe. Served from 1941-1945.

9th_Spitin
05-09-2005, 09:56 PM
I met Lt. Cmdr. Ray Hawkins, USN at the Pensicola Naval Museum. My mother in law worked with him and I met him 10 yrs ago, all I knew about him was that he was one of the early Blue Angels. If I would have done my homework I would have known that he was the Blue Angels Flight leader in 48-50 and 52-53 as well as a WWII USN Ace with 14 kills. He would tell my Mother in law that the pilots with these new jets are pansys.
Story about Hawkins bailing out at supersonic speeds. (http://www.blueangels.org/History/NANews/Articles/Oct53/Oct53.htm)

han freak solo
05-09-2005, 10:12 PM
My Grandfather. Captain David L. Dobie of the USAAF flying C-87 cargo transports in the China-Burma-India theater during WWII. The C-87 was the ungunned cargo modified B-24.

The only story I recall is that one of his group aircraft didn't make it back over the "hump". Speculation was due to fuel system failure on an engine since the lost plane had trouble with it on a prior mission. Hard to keep altitude over the mountains with one less engine. He never saw them again.

Other than that, he mentioned that his aircraft took on ground fire, but were never attacked by enemy aircraft.

Stateside after his tour, he trained pilots in the USAAF until the war ended. His favorite plane to fly was the A-26 Invader. He mentioned it was the fastest and most manuverable plane he'd been in. He didn't count trainers and he didn't get fighter experience.

He gave me and my brother some of his war medals when we were kids. I still have an Air Medal and a Distinguished Flying Cross that he gave me in the 1970s.

He's the whole reason I got interested in WWII aircraft. He even built some model planes with us grandkids way back. Of course, he built the B-24 Liberator.

After the edit:

I just remembered two other WWII era pilots I knew.

#1 I had an instructor at Texas State Technical Institute back in 1985-87 that was a USAAF P-38 pilot. He taught my navigation and weights & balances ground classes. He did mention zooming a football stadium in California with the P-38 and that the P-38 would lose some antenna when pulling high-G manuvers. I can still see his face but I can't remember his name. Tough old guy.

#2 After washing out of flight school I got into printing. My supervisor at the print shop I worked at from 1987-1994 was a Navy PBY pilot. His name is Frank Felcman. Another tough old guy.

The war ended before either of them saw action.

GreyFox5
05-09-2005, 10:37 PM
I went to my hometown Detroit Michigan to visit my folks and see the Thunder Over Michigan in 2003. I was able to get American Ace Clarence E. "Bud" Anderson to sign his book "To Fly And Fight" http://www.highironillustrations.com/rogues/bud_anderson.html

And Gunther Rall German Ace
Ace http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0971553300/103-0749953-5272610?v=glance

Chuck Yeager was also there but was so mobbed that you couldn't get near him.

Honestly these men are all good friends and have many years talking about there flying experiences. It was a great time to see these guys talk about there time in the air flying long hours in the case of Mr. Yeager and Mr. Anderson and Mr. Rall talking about how cold it was in Russia. It was great to have a chance to have a moment with these men and shake there hands. I'll never know why I'm so drawn to WWII and those pilots. If you get the chance to meet a WWII vet or any vet make sure you thank them for there service.

Esquire_1
05-10-2005, 03:58 AM
I met Johnnie Johnson at the Wanaka Airshow in 1996 (?). He was leaving the VIP tent after the show had finished with two "younger" ladies, one on each arm. I asked him to sign my souvenir book which he did so happily. I asked him " have you had a nice day?" and he just answered "I've had a few wines !!!!"
.....still going strong after all that time .....

CHeers Esq.

Bremspropeller
05-10-2005, 04:51 AM
A friend of mine's grandpa flew among JG26 (AFAIK) and II(Sturm)./JG6 - Gefr. Karl Hagemann. (not sure about the rank)

But he does rarely discuss his career.

pacettid
05-10-2005, 05:31 AM
Clarence E. "Bud" Anderson
Marion E. Carl
Chuck Yeager - looked at my wife's cleavage and told her she had "beautiful blue eyes"...lol...typical
Gunther Rall
Joe Foss
Francis "Gabby" Gabreski
Robert L. Scott - AVG
Tex Hill - AVG
Harry W. Brown - Pearl Harbor Zero shootdown
Rex Barber - Adm. Yamamoto Shootdown Mission
George Gay - Sole survivor Torpedo 8, Midway

Met them all and had dinner with them at the 1988 "Gathering of Eagles" seminar at Montgomery AFB, Alabama

TgD Thunderbolt56
05-10-2005, 05:49 AM
I met and talked with Butch Voris (First Blue) at NAS JAX last year. There was almost noone around and he was signing his book. I stood and talked with him for almost an hour and virtually noone stopped to listen or join in. I wasn't upset about it as it allowed ME to monopolize his time.

There have been many others (Gabreski, Zemke, Paul Conger, Paul Tibbets...and my Grandfather who flew B-17's and B-29's)

Here's some info on Butch Voris: http://www.acepilots.com/usn_voris.html


TB

BSS_CUDA
05-10-2005, 06:30 AM
my two arent pilots but war hero's ( in my book ) none the less. I've meet Buck Compton, and Don Malarky, from the 101st Airborne (band of brothers) they spoke at a youth event at our church. 2 of the most humble ppl I have ever meet.

WOLFMondo
05-10-2005, 06:41 AM
One of my parents neighbours, I only ever knew him as Mr Matthews was a Spitfire pilot who flew out of Hendon. My freinds Grandfather was a Squadron Leader with a DFC.

9th_Spitin
05-10-2005, 12:51 PM
Great stories, keep em coming.

trumper
05-10-2005, 01:02 PM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gifWhen i was in the air cadets i met and got Douglas Baders autograph WOW.

MarkGos
05-10-2005, 09:12 PM
My Father. Richard John Gosling - Pilot Officer in RNZAF Sqdn 75. Flew Lancasters from 1942 to wars end (36 Missions) - Celebrated his 83rd birthday just the other day

9th_Spitin
05-10-2005, 09:17 PM
Originally posted by MarkGos:
My Father. Richard John Gosling - Pilot Officer in RNZAF Sqdn 75. Flew Lancasters from 1942 to wars end (36 Missions) - Celebrated his 83rd birthday just the other day

Tell your father Happy Birthday from the 9th Flying Knights.

MrOblongo
05-10-2005, 09:43 PM
Martin Sch¶fer , Luftwaffe Pilot, flew all war in almost all planes (except single-engined fighters). He died last year and i scanned his Afrika Front Photo Album (What a treasure!!, it have photos of Kreta Assault from inside the cockpit of a Ju52!). He was Lufthansa pilot before the war and he made the trip to Athens in Ju52. Some nice things he told me...
*Flew with Rommel in a Fiesler Storch
*Carried Paratroopers to Kreta in Operation Merkur
*Flew some weird Italian Cargo planes like SM.74 (i have a pic of it!)
*Me323 from Africa to Hamburg with wounded soldiers
*He was shot down over the mediterranean sea while carrying supplies to the Afrika Korps..he just heard and explosion and woke up floating on water to be rescued by an Italian Patrol Boat.
*In the last days of War he stole a He111 and flew to Berlin to rescue his family...he was congratulated for this action by his unit commander, lol.

I have made some research and i think he was part of Kampfgeschwader z.b.V. 1. Bad i only had the chance to speak with him once...

9th_Spitin
05-11-2005, 09:26 AM
Got to be more than 13 of us that have met and talked with a WWII pilot or war Vet. I meen, we fly WWII combat sims because something about the planes and the era draw us to it. Why not tap into some of great resorces that live in our community and get some real live knowledge from WWII. I am sure these Vets would not mind the attention or mind telling some stories from the days of thier youth.

JG52Uther
05-11-2005, 10:22 AM
Hans Ekkerhard Bob at Duxford last year,nice guy http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 10:25 AM
Well, two family friends, Bill and Murray Donavan(brothers)of New Brunswick Canada used to be Lancaster pilots. I can't say much more than that as I was too young to know what to ask them. They used to take me flying in their Cessna.

I can't remember the stories Murray used to tell me but the images of what he described me are burned into my memory. Sorry I can't give more than that. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-sad.gif

Fritz Franzen

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 10:30 AM
Hey, almost forgot. The last surviving LW aces meet every year in Eberns, Germany. My friend's glider club hosts the meet and he invited me to the next one in August.

I missed last year's meet which was too bad considering Gunther Rall and Chuck Jaeger were present. I'm looking forward to this year's meet and was already planning to announce it here to get you guys to post questions for the aces.

I'll let you guys know when I am 110% sure I can make it. Start thinking of questions.

Fritz Franzen

crazyivan1970
05-11-2005, 10:41 AM
Very cool thread. Hoping to meet some pilot this year @ww2 weekend.

SKIDRO_79FS
05-11-2005, 10:55 AM
OK...here goes...

I have met about 30 former members of the 20th. Fighter Group, corresponded with another 20 and the families of around 40 more. Among those I have met in person were the late Jack Ilfrey and the late Harley Brown, the Group's last two living aces.

I have also met the late Robert Morgan, pilot of the "Memphis Belle", Paul Tibbets pilot of "Enola Gay" - first plane to drop an atomic bomb, the late Fred Olivi co-pilot of "Bock's Car" - 2nd. plane to drop an atomic bomb, Greg "Pappy" Boyington, Jim Hill and Tom Emerage of VMF-214 (The Black Sheep), several Tuskegee Airmen, a former B-24 instructor, a former B-25 gunner and several former USAAF, USN and USMC crew members.

I've spoken to Gunther Rall on the phone during one of his visits to the US, corresponded with Robert L. Scott (AVG ace), the late Marion E. Carl (USMC ace/test pilot), Scott Crossfield (X-15 test pilot), Rudolph Opitz (Me-163 test pilot), John Glenn, Leo Nadeau (George Bush's Avenger crew), Vernon Graham (USN ace), Alex Vraciu (USN ace), Karl Leeb (Luftwaffe Night Fighter Pilot), the late John Bolt and Bruce Matheson VMF-214 (The Black Sheep), Bob Barkey, Herschel "Herky" Green and Arthur Fiedler (325th.FG Checktail Clan), Bob Goebel and James Brooks (31st.FG), Archie Jackson, John Mullins, Robin Hanson, Robert Lee, Robert Vrilakis and Robert Spitler (1st. FG), Frank Birtciel (55th FG), Bobby Gibbes (One of Austrialia's leading aces) and Tony Gaze (Austrialian Ace, DFC) and John "Pirate" Nichols - the last of the gunfighters, the last USN pilot to score a guns only kill in a F-8 Crusader.

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 10:59 AM
Originally posted by SKIDRO_79FS:
OK...here goes...

I have met about 30 former members of the 20th. Fighter Group, corresponded with another 20 and the families of around 40 more. Among those I have met in person were the late Jack Ilfrey and the late Harley Brown, the Group's last two living aces.

I have also met the late Robert Morgan, pilot of the "Memphis Belle", Paul Tibbets pilot of "Enola Gay" - first plane to drop an atomic bomb, the late Fred Olivi co-pilot of "Bock's Car" - 2nd. plane to drop an atomic bomb, Greg "Pappy" Boyington, Jim Hill and Tom Emerage of VMF-214 (The Black Sheep), several Tuskegee Airmen, a former B-24 instructor, a former B-25 gunner and several former USAAF, USN and USMC crew members.

I've spoken to Gunther Rall on the phone during one of his visits to the US, corresponded with Robert L. Scott (AVG ace), the late Marion E. Carl (USMC ace/test pilot), Scott Crossfield (X-15 test pilot), Rudolph Opitz (Me-163 test pilot), John Glenn, Leo Nadeau (George Bush's Avenger crew), Vernon Graham (USN ace), Alex Vraciu (USN ace), Karl Leeb (Luftwaffe Night Fighter Pilot), the late John Bolt and Bruce Matheson VMF-214 (The Black Sheep), Bob Barkey, Herschel "Herky" Green and Arthur Fiedler (325th.FG Checktail Clan), Bob Goebel and James Brooks (31st.FG), Archie Jackson, John Mullins, Robin Hanson, Robert Lee, Robert Vrilakis and Robert Spitler (1st. FG), Frank Birtciel (55th FG), Bobby Gibbes (One of Austrialia's leading aces) and Tony Gaze (Austrialian Ace, DFC) and John "Pirate" Nichols - the last of the gunfighters, the last USN pilot to score a guns only kill in a F-8 Crusader.

Can we be friends? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Do you want my sister? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

Can I wash your car? http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-happy.gif

Fritz Franzen

SKIDRO_79FS
05-11-2005, 11:05 AM
LMAO!!!!!!!!!!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

I've just been at this a lot longer than most. I met Greg Boyington in the late 70's, for instance.

Of all those listed one of the saddest stories is probably Marion Carl, I sent him a letter in January 1998 and didn't receive a reply until May and it included an autographed 8x10 inch photo of a F4F Wildcat. He was killed in his home by a punk looking for drug money just a few weeks later. Even though he was suffering from early stage Alzheimers he still knew enough to jump in front of his wife to shield her from the gunman's blast. She survived the attack.

LuckyBoy1
05-11-2005, 11:43 AM
I've met a few and probably the most famous one was Chuck Yeager, but the circumstances under which I met him were... well, kinda embarrassing.

I met him at the Big Sur Pylon race in 1974. At the time, he was being sponsored by DuPpont Chemical and I was just a hay seed who saved a few bucks for gas to fly the tail modified P-51 we owned. I flew under my dead brother's name because I was too young to fly legally. During the race, I could stand about 10.5 G's before passing out and Chuck could go for maybe 8.5 - 9.0. As a result, him and his much more powerfull engine would pass me in the straight areas and around the pylons I would pass him again. One time as I pased him, I almost ran into him. Did I think? Oh no, I'm gonna die?! No! I thought, oh my God, my Father is going to find out I've been pylon racing and also that I killed Chuck Yeager! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

The nice thing about the Big Sur course at that time was the finish line was just after a pylon, so I won!

Unfortunately, even though I could withstand the 10.5 G's, it did make me sick and give me a concussion. I walked up to the stand to accept the trophy. Chucky boy was already up there and had accepted his second place prize. As I tried to wobble on up the steps, he looked down at me (a very tall man as I remember) and said...

Boy, how come your brains ain't running out of your ears?

I opened my mouth to reply, but barfed on him and the nice lady in the bikini to boot! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Later, after I got out of the hospital, I had a few beers with Chuck and he somehow talked DuPont into giving me one of his racing engines that had a titanuim block. To thank him and also to be fair about the race, I sent him the first place trophy and explained why.

The next year he met my Father at the Great Lakes Air show and was nice enough to pretend we had never met! Very cool guy all around especially when you consider that I puked on him!

Pirschjaeger
05-11-2005, 11:56 AM
Originally posted by LuckyBoy1:
I've met a few and probably the most famous one was Chuck Yeager, but the circumstances under which I met him were... well, kinda embarrassing.

I met him at the Big Sur Pylon race in 1974. At the time, he was being sponsored by DuPpont Chemical and I was just a hay seed who saved a few bucks for gas to fly the tail modified P-51 we owned. I flew under my dead brother's name because I was too young to fly legally. During the race, I could stand about 10.5 G's before passing out and Chuck could go for maybe 8.5 - 9.0. As a result, him and his much more powerfull engine would pass me in the straight areas and around the pylons I would pass him again. One time as I pased him, I almost ran into him. Did I think? Oh no, I'm gonna die?! No! I thought, oh my God, my Father is going to find out I've been pylon racing and also that I killed Chuck Yeager! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/blink.gif

The nice thing about the Big Sur course at that time was the finish line was just after a pylon, so I won!

Unfortunately, even though I could withstand the 10.5 G's, it did make me sick and give me a concussion. I walked up to the stand to accept the trophy. Chucky boy was already up there and had accepted his second place prize. As I tried to wobble on up the steps, he looked down at me (a very tall man as I remember) and said...

Boy, how come your brains ain't running out of your ears?

I opened my mouth to reply, but barfed on him and the nice lady in the bikini to boot! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif

Later, after I got out of the hospital, I had a few beers with Chuck and he somehow talked DuPont into giving me one of his racing engines that had a titanuim block. To thank him and also to be fair about the race, I sent him the first place trophy and explained why.

The next year he met my Father at the Great Lakes Air show and was nice enough to pretend we had never met! Very cool guy all around especially when you consider that I puked on him!

Ha ha ha, consider yourself lucky he didn't have ammo. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

Cool thread I must say. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Fritz Franzen

LuckyBoy1
05-11-2005, 11:58 AM
Yeah, with them Texicans, you never can tell! Actually, he was about the friendliest person I've ever met. Kinda hard to believe he ever shot at anyone much less shot them down or killed them.

SlickStick
05-11-2005, 12:09 PM
The only one that I know of and have spoken with over comms is =353=MonroeQ aka Lt. Col. Monroe Q. Williams. He flew a P-47 and P-51 in WWII.

You can see him in HyperLobby regularly. Great guy to speak with and I remember the first time I spoke with him online back in Jane's WWII Fighters (around 2000-2001). I thanked him for all that he had done and I spoke of the sacrafices that were made for our freedom.

He cooly replied, "We were just doing our jobs."

Class act, be sure. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

jurinko
05-11-2005, 12:14 PM
Jan Reznak, Slovak WWII fighter ace with 31+ victories in 1943 over Kuban against Soviets.

http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/pictures/1943_reznak.JPG

http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/pictures/reznak_01.JPG

http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/pictures/reznak_03.JPG

http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/pictures/reznak_06.JPG

LuckyBoy1
05-11-2005, 12:17 PM
Very cool indeed! What an honor to have that guy in your house! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

9th_Spitin
05-11-2005, 12:17 PM
NICE. What did he think of IL2?

jurinko
05-11-2005, 12:22 PM
Look here for more pics and interview we did with him. We visited him, it´s inside his house.

http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/Html/reznak.htm

LilHorse
05-11-2005, 12:22 PM
I knew a fellow named Parker DuPouy who was a member of the third squadron, the Hell's Angels, of the AVG. He was credited with 3.5 victories. After they disbanded the AVG he went to work for Republic as a test pilot and was one of the test pilots for when they were developing the P-47.

He died sometime in the early 1990s I believe. When I knew him I wasn't anywhere near as interested in WWII avaition as I am now. And I never really took advantage of the opportunity to talk with him at length about it. All I ever knew was that he was a Flying Tiger.

Everything I've learned about him since has been from books and magazine articles about the AVG or the P-47.

gunnut1986
05-11-2005, 02:59 PM
My grandfather, Ens. Frank "Pat" Sedler flew f6f Hellcats in the Navy. I have his logbook-- after his training he flew f6f-5's with VF99, VF100, and VF27. He would always tell me about the biggest challenge he had ever faced: night landing on an aircraft carrier. His logbook mentions strikes on Rota.
When the war was over, he participated in the show of "naval superiority" which I've heard was the largest formation of carrier based aircraft in history.
He loved to take pictures-- I'm very glad he did, because they are priceless. I may post a couple that I have scanned if anyone is interested. He recently passed away and every time I think about it I wish i would have asked him more about his experiences.

SlickStick
05-11-2005, 03:14 PM
Originally posted by gunnut1986:
My grandfather, Ens. Frank "Pat" Sedler flew f6f Hellcats in the Navy. I have his logbook-- after his training he flew f6f-5's with VF99, VF100, and VF27. He would always tell me about the biggest challenge he had ever faced: night landing on an aircraft carrier. His logbook mentions strikes on Rota.
When the war was over, he participated in the show of "naval superiority" which I've heard was the largest formation of carrier based aircraft in history.
He loved to take pictures-- I'm very glad he did, because they are priceless. I may post a couple that I have scanned if anyone is interested. He recently passed away and every time I think about it I wish i would have asked him more about his experiences.

Considering that your grandfather was a WWII pilot that you met, I think some pictures and a few words about them would be excellently appropriate for this thread. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

9th_Spitin
05-11-2005, 04:34 PM
If this thread stays on topic could we make it a sticky?

han freak solo
05-11-2005, 06:08 PM
Originally posted by gunnut1986:
He loved to take pictures-- I'm very glad he did, because they are priceless. I may post a couple that I have scanned if anyone is interested. He recently passed away and every time I think about it I wish i would have asked him more about his experiences.

Pics please!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif



By jurinko:

Jan Reznak, Slovak WWII fighter ace with 31+ victories in 1943 over Kuban against Soviets.

WOW!! Too, cool!! Does he think we are all just silly fools for flying sims?

huggy87
05-11-2005, 06:11 PM
Zemke: I didn't know who he was at the time. I was only 18 at the time and was receiving a scholarship from the daedalians, of which he was a member.

Chuck Yeager: Well I didn't really meet him, but rather I talked to him on the phone for about 10 minutes. He is an acquaintance of my grandmother. I naively was trying to get him to come speak at my commissioning. He was unavailable, something about a 50th anniversary of breaking the sound barrier flight. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_rolleyes.gif

Rhinebacker: A friend of my grandfathers. One of the black sheep squadron. Pappy's autobiography mentions him getting shot in the @ss.

Larry Main, my other grandfather: Flew B-24s in the Pacific.

Wilbur Tracy, my neighbor and friend: Flew B-17s out of Italy.

My Great Uncle White: Never actually met him. He died in a B-29 as a flight engineer. I do, however, have his B-29 flight manual.

My Great Uncle Norman Dwight: A tailgunner on a B-26. Shot down over Germany- the only member of his crew to survive. He was nearly stabbed with a pitchfork by a German farmer. He survived as a POW and went on to become a missionary in China.

Wallstein
05-11-2005, 06:33 PM
Originally posted by jurinko:
Look here for more pics and interview we did with him. We visited him, it´s inside his house.

<A HREF="http://www.kurita.sk/PRIVATE/Html/reznak.htm" TARGET=_blank>http://www.kurit
a.sk/PRIVATE/Html/reznak.htm</A>

I thank you very, very much!

Wallstein

J_Weaver
05-11-2005, 08:17 PM
My uncle's dad (I guess my grandfather-in-law) became a bombardier in a B-24 in the PTO after he was washed out of flight school due to eye problems.

There is a Spitfire pilot living a street behind me.

Enforcer572005
05-11-2005, 11:31 PM
I met the late R.T. Smith at Harlingen tx after the 89 CAF airshow where i took 60+ 36 exposure rolls of film. He was trying to get out of that rinky **** airport in the middle of nowhere-the only good thing about that place was the CAF and the best airshow in the world each oct.

He was trying to figure out how to turn his rental car keys to an outfit that was closed, as was I. He had a great vocabulary of colorful expletives that had to be heard to be appreciated...i truly wish I could have recorded it.We both wound up throwing our keys into the cubicle and filling out the milage thingy hanging on the wall.

I recognized him having seen him selling his book "tale of a tiger" at the field. I told him I was honored to meet a warrior like him and thanked him for helping preserve the free world and having the guts to get into the war when he didnt have to. Neat guy to talk to. He wondered if the P-40 he left on a mtn in china was still there.

My dads RC plane buddy, Bill POlley , was a P-51B/D pilot in the 8th AF. flew lots of escort, and said he tried to intimidate a german farmer out of a field of vehicles so he could straffe them, straffed them anyway, and was glad to see the guy survived and was shaking his fist at him as he flew off waggling his wings.

He also said he liked to attack a punctual german train on a regualar basis when coming back from escorts, when they allowed them to leave the bombers and shoot stuff up after they egresses. those guys were on time every day, and he loved watching the locomotives blow up. about the 3rd time he did that he said they must have had enough of him because the sides fell off a box car and it was a quad 20mm...said it looked like a swamp full of catails, never seen so many barrels. he got on the deck and hauled outa there. he also shared an FW with a guy once.

he had a commisioned painting of a 109 with no damage and the pilot bailing out. he said he jumped this guy in a fight in late 44, fired a burst, then saw that it was one of the "abbeville kids", and thought how foolish he was for annoying this guy. suddenly the canopy nearly hit him and the guy just bailed. makes sense, as that was t5he policy when luft pilots thougth they were gonna get it.when he died , his wish was to have his ashes dropped over the airport at Enterprise Alabama (Ft Rucker) where he had his flying businesss. when the erocoupe (spelling) pilot opened his canopy to drop them, they got blown back in and now he occupies every nook and cranny of that machine. my dad swears thats exactly what he had in mind.I saw that guy hover a sikorky H-34 over a cornfield next to our house in the sticks as he returned a model plane my dad had lost that he had flown around and found-an excellent use of the taxpayers funds back in 64!

also met Rall, GAlland, Krupinsky, and Stienhoff at a simposium in marietta ga in 83. I got vietnam ace steve ritche's autograph, but i just got to shake hands with the rest. I thnked them for their contribution to NATO and modern military aviation after the war, which many have forgotten about. Cliff Roberson was sitting in front of me.

met George GAy there also, and read his great book, sole survivor. you could make a cmpn outa that.

Met tom Blackburn and bought his book at an airshow. most of them are gone now. At least i got to see and meet living history.

peashooter2005
05-12-2005, 10:10 PM
Charlie Damour was one of the greatest guys I have known. Flew gliders, once on Monty's Holland expedition, and maybe other trips, we're not sure. A glider now adorns his headstone.
I worked with John Glasmacher a few years ago. He flew Buffaloes as a teenager for the Dutch in Java. One mission he was sneaking up on a zero until he checked his six and found three others sneaking up on him. He managed to get it down in a rice paddy. I showed him a picture of the Boeing 314 Clipper in a harbor as it was making its flight home the 'long way' from New Zealand. He instantly recognized the plane and the location and told me what when and where without reading the accompanying article. He spent most of the war working on the Kwai bridge and others.
I also worked with Gordon Brooks, who occupied the gunner's seat in a Marine Corp Dauntless for the last year of the war. He showed me a bunch of recon photos of his handiwork-small islands with runways cratered into moonscapes. He wanted to go to flight school but the war ended and they sent him home.
Greg Boyington signed a copy of his book for me at a Chino airshow, maybe a year before he died. Was quite happy to deal with the long line of people on a stifling afternoon.
All the vets I have met have had a depth of character I hope I never have to develope. S!

9th_Spitin
05-14-2005, 08:13 AM
Adding to the story of Lt. Cmdr. Ray Hawkins, My mother in Law told me that when he had to bail out of his F9F-6 at 30,000 ft, they thought that no way he survived the ejection at a est. 680 mph as well as only being in a light flight suit in sub freezing temps without oxygen. They went looking for his body, they looked at a farm were they saw his chute go down and were shocked to see Hawk walking out of the farmers house. He was a tough man. God rest his soul, he passed away last year. He recieved three Navy Crosses , three Distinguished Flying Crosses and four Air Medals during his tours.

tralkpha
05-14-2005, 09:33 AM
My grandfather Bill Dodd flew l-3s as a forward observer.

some of the storys he tells the most often are:

After becoming disoriented on the wrong side of the front line, some number of enemy troops
fired at the aircraft. Hugging the deck and trying to get away he spotted a tank on the
other side of a hill from the enemy soldiers.
Assuming the tank was allied, he told the observer to write a note telling the tank that there were enemy troops over the hill. Just after the observer dropped the yellow bag containg the note they realized the tank was
firing at them too. Upon returning to base he left the aircraft without examining it. After
some time his CO asked him to come sit in the plane for bit. After he was seated in the plane
his CO took a piece of string and began to connect it to several bullet holes evidently
made by a machine gun. Sitting upright as he was, the string crossed straight across directly in front of his head!

During one flight they spotted a fi-156 sitting under a tree. Since it appeared undamaged grandad flew back later bringing one of the mechanics to help him examine the storch. the only thing wrong with the aircraft was it was out of gas and it looked like some kids had been playing inside it.
They put some gas in the storch but the mechanic was not authorized to fly the l-3, so the mechanic flew the storch back!
The fi-156 stayed for several weeks, everyone flew it and the mechanics took good care of it. All was well until someone a little higher up got wind of it and it was taken away.

His unit lost only one aircraft to enemy fire. They were shot down by a lone 109 while on final to land.
The 109 circled (or looped grandad isn't specific) around to check his kill and the base aa shot him down.

George Artelt Was my Grandfather's houseboy after the war while grandad was stationed in germany and then served as his houseboy again several years later in Dayton Ohio. At first Grandad didnt have any idea his houseboy had been a 190 pilot during the war!
I don't know if he ever flew 109s, don't know how many kills (if any) he had or what unit(s) he served with. I only know he was shot down at least 3-4 times. Sadly I only met him once before he passed on http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif
He had some very old photos he allowed me to see including a picture of his father as a young man in his dress wwi uniform. None of the photos included military hardware and he mostly avoided the subject of his participation in the war.