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p-11.cAce
06-11-2010, 12:11 PM
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ROXunreal
06-11-2010, 01:58 PM
Classic http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

JtD
06-12-2010, 06:24 AM
Thanks for sharing!

Choctaw111
06-12-2010, 07:33 AM
Great movie and very informative.
Thanks for sharing.

Treetop64
06-12-2010, 09:03 AM
My fave WWII Warbird. Thank you!

AllorNothing117
06-18-2010, 01:27 PM
Must have watched that vid and many like it a million times! What a plane <3

rfxcasey
06-28-2010, 06:53 AM
This video brought up some interesting points and I am wondering how they work in game. Like reducing the mixture on a failed engine to reduce the chance of fire.

Also they mentioned feathering the throttle. I always thought that meant to reduce RPMs to just above idle but I googled it and it sounds like it means that the prop pitch is set so the leading an trailing edges of the prop blade are close to parallel with the airflow direction over the plane. Didn't think you could set the angle that steep but what do I know. I'd love to see the mechanics implemented in blade pitch. Always wondered but never bothered to research it.

Great video, I was flying a p-38 in the Ubizoo server the other day after not touching one for a long time. After watching this I am definitely going to practice my Lightening skills. I only wish I had a dual throttle setup so I could pull some wicked turns and hammerheads by using differential power. I haven't found a way to easily control engines individually yet as I only have a single throttle setup.

The other thing that caught my ear was he started calling manifold pressure "mercury". I never heard of that before, anyone know where it derives from?

p-11.cAce
06-28-2010, 07:58 AM
The other thing that caught my ear was he started calling manifold pressure "mercury". I never heard of that before, anyone know where it derives from?

Barometric pressure was measured by a U shaped tube with mercury on one side in a graduated scale. By applying a vacuum on one side of the U the mercury is "lifted" x-number of inches. The more vacuum applied the higher the mercury rises in the tube - i.e. inches of mercury.

M_Gunz
06-28-2010, 09:28 AM
Originally posted by p-11.cAce:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">The other thing that caught my ear was he started calling manifold pressure "mercury". I never heard of that before, anyone know where it derives from?

Barometric pressure was measured by a U shaped tube with mercury on one side in a graduated scale. By applying a vacuum on one side of the U the mercury is "lifted" x-number of inches. The more vacuum applied the higher the mercury rises in the tube - i.e. inches of mercury. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Close but not how a fluid barometer works. You fill a tube with one closed end with your working fluid and turn it bottom up
while holding a finger over the open end. You put the open end into a reservoir of the working fluid. The vacuum is created when
you take your finger off the open end and the fluid pulls down against the closed end. The working fluid pulls its own vacuum and
outside air pressure pushes against that, supporting a column of fluid in the inverted tube. Go where air pressure is higher or
lower (like up) and the height from the top surface of the reservoir fluid to the top of the supported column changes.

The vacuum is made by the pull of the liquid away from the closed end of the tube at the top. It's always the same vacuum
unless you've let some air in or have a short tube with no vacuum at the top.

The Wiki has some pictures. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barometer)

Torricelli invented the liquid barometer in 1643 without having or needing a vacuum pump.

On a standard day at sea level, air pressure can support just under a 30 inch column of mercury. The vacuum does not change.