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woofiedog
01-22-2005, 02:48 AM
Here are a few Photo's of Japanese Aircraft during and after the Attack.


http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32908.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32460.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g10000/g19931.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g10000/g13040.jpg

Interior of the cockpit of a "Zero" which crashed into Building 52 at Fort Kamehameha, Oahu, during the 7 December 1941 raid on Pearl Harbor. The pilot, who was killed, was NAP1/c Takeshi Hirano. Plane's tail code was "AI-154".
Note the U.S. manufactured Fairchild Radio Compass in the upper center (Compass Model RC-4, Serial # 484). It was tuned in on 760 KC.


http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g20000/g22158.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32441.jpg

Tail of a "Zero" which crash landed on Niihau Island, Territory of Hawaii, on 7 December 1941, following the raid on Pearl Harbor. The plane's tail code was "BII-120". It came from the carrier Hiryu and landed on Niihau after running low on fuel.
Some of the rudder's fabric covering has been cut off by souvenir hunters.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g20000/g22162.jpg

woofiedog
01-22-2005, 02:48 AM
Here are a few Photo's of Japanese Aircraft during and after the Attack.


http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32908.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32460.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g10000/g19931.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g10000/g13040.jpg

Interior of the cockpit of a "Zero" which crashed into Building 52 at Fort Kamehameha, Oahu, during the 7 December 1941 raid on Pearl Harbor. The pilot, who was killed, was NAP1/c Takeshi Hirano. Plane's tail code was "AI-154".
Note the U.S. manufactured Fairchild Radio Compass in the upper center (Compass Model RC-4, Serial # 484). It was tuned in on 760 KC.


http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g20000/g22158.jpg

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g30000/g32441.jpg

Tail of a "Zero" which crash landed on Niihau Island, Territory of Hawaii, on 7 December 1941, following the raid on Pearl Harbor. The plane's tail code was "BII-120". It came from the carrier Hiryu and landed on Niihau after running low on fuel.
Some of the rudder's fabric covering has been cut off by souvenir hunters.

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/g20000/g22162.jpg

joeap
01-22-2005, 04:01 AM
Really nice pics. I wonder what intelligence info the US was able to glean from these wrecks.

woofiedog
01-22-2005, 08:10 AM
http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-surprised.gif One of the facts was that the Japanese was using American equipment for their Aircraft...
Note the U.S. manufactured Fairchild Radio Compass in the upper center (Compass Model RC-4, Serial # 484). It was tuned in on 760 KC.

MO_JOJO
01-24-2005, 11:38 PM
Where were the 1st shots of WWII fired (involving the US)? Pearl Harbor? Close...at Kaneohe NAS (now MCAS Kaneohe). Here is a good link for more info. The first IJN casualty in action against the US came in this battle, as well. If you ever get a chance to visit the base, there is a plaque honoring the pilot, near the officer's pool
at the base of Pu'u Hawaii Loa, or "Kansas Tower" (KT).

http://www.flightjournal.com/fj/articles/lost_p-36/sterling1.asp

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/MO_JOJO/2_incoming_zeroes.jpg

2 Incoming zeroes (At Kaneohe or Bellows?)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/MO_JOJO/kaneohe.jpg

Aerial photo of raid in progress at Kaneohe.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v233/MO_JOJO/1208localnews_b.jpg

Hawaiian woman returning the helmet of Lt. Iida to his relative, 58 years after his bungled kamikaze attempt at Kaneohe NAS. The LT. was the first known Japanese casualty of the Pacific War.

civildog
01-25-2005, 10:15 PM
The Japanese were very good at adapting other countries' parts into thier weapons systems.

The Japanese battlecruisers and cruisers that destroyed the Russian fleet at Tsushima Straits had guns by Krupp, engines from England, and steel for the armor from the U.S.! They had previously sent envoys all over the world to examine the different ways of building heavy warships and adopted those parts each country was best at making and encorporating it into their designs.