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jessen2005
10-17-2005, 02:56 PM
I have been reading many of your notes with great interest, and got the idea to send some think different.
I, an "older model" born 1930, the war was part of my life for 5 years, forgot to tell you, live and lived in Copenhagen Denmark, actually from 42 to 45 next door to the German Marine Staff for operations in the North See and inner Danish waters.
In 1948 I got the chance to visit Bremen, Germany.
On my summer holliday, by help from freinds of my parents, I got a trip on a ship, believe it or not, on a real Liberty Ship. First call Kiel, then though the Nord-ostseekanal to Bremen.
In Bremen the ship moored just a few 100 m from the Deschimag Shipyard, the place where more than 75 type IX and a number of type VII boats was build.
The yard was flatten by RAF and US Air Force, cranes was in the harbour, buildings was ruins and wrecks in the water, but the yard layout was clearly visible. See http://www.457thbombergroup.org/strike/bbs035.jpg.
I also had a chance to come close to and see one of the U-Boat Bunkers, the Valenti Bunker at Bremen-Farge. For details see http://www.lostplaces.de/valentin/
Bremen, standing on a beer case close to Deschimag Yard you could see the town centre app. 2.5 km away, the town was one pile of bricks, here and there smoking chimneypots sticking out of the bricks.
Just imagine, what a place for a U-boat crew to come home to, after months in the North Atlantic.
Many years later come to know a shipbuilding engineer from L├╝becker Flender-Werke, building VIIC/41, but that's an other story.
Yours.

Kaleun1961
10-17-2005, 02:59 PM
Many of the front soldiers returned to bombed out homes and dead family. What a kicker that must have been, as well!

It says something about the virtues of the Germans and Japanese that they were able to rebuild complex and vigorous economies from flattened ruins.

The_Silent_O
10-17-2005, 03:09 PM
Originally posted by Kaleun1961:
Many of the front soldiers returned to bombed out homes and dead family. What a kicker that must have been, as well!

It says something about the virtues of the Germans and Japanese that they were able to rebuild complex and vigorous economies from flattened ruins.

...with much assistance and trading with the victorious allied nations. Marshall Plan and General MacArthur's guidance in Japan. Sadly we turned a blind eye to prosecuting all the war crimes...But compared to communism I think we did pretty good!

Kaleun1961
10-17-2005, 03:16 PM
Yes, all that goes as well. I did have that in mind as I wrote, but I thought not to put that in lest I seem begrudging in some way. Stalin declined to be helped by the West, and history records how shabbily life in the East was after the war.

I recall reading somewhere that during the Korean War, the US was short of steel, so they released Krupp from jail to get the German steel production up and help out the war effort.

The Marshall Plan was a brilliant piece of work by George Catlett [there's a unique name.] He did not wish to see resentment fester and bring about a third war. Too bad this thinking wasn't applied after WW1.

jessen2005
10-17-2005, 03:47 PM
Originally posted by Kaleun1961:
Yes, all that goes as well. I did have that in mind as I wrote, but I thought not to put that in lest I seem begrudging in some way. Stalin declined to be helped by the West, and history records how shabbily life in the East was after the war.

I recall reading somewhere that during the Korean War, the US was short of steel, so they released Krupp from jail to get the German steel production up and help out the war effort.

The Marshall Plan was a brilliant piece of work by George Catlett [there's a unique name.] He did not wish to see resentment fester and bring about a third war. Too bad this thinking wasn't applied after WW1.
How are you right regarding the Marshall Plan.