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Atomic_Marten
12-11-2004, 09:40 AM
I am currently playing 1942 IJA KI43 campaign and I have noticed some weird? issues about radio in Hayabusa..

I have also read in the PF manual that early in the war some Japanese aircraft was not equipped with sophisticated radioes unlike some other air forces.

So I figured that must be the reason why I can not contact anyone while on my way to target destination and in generally communication is almost impossible (I can not ask for help while engaged with enemy fighters, cannot contact wingman etc.). The only exception from that 'rule' is when I am close to the base, and then my radio is functional (miracle?http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif) -- I can ask tower for vector to home base (ok I can see the base but still..http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif), I can ask for help etc. Why is *this* possible near base?
I hear some chatter rarely and if I'm not mistaken only in Strike escort missions when I escort Betty bombers..

And also one other thing; when I am airborne I often switch to 'enemy frequency' and guess what -- radio is working perfectly -> I can hear Australian pilots http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/10.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif (that is usefull when Cobra formation is directly ahead I know exactly the moment when they spotted me http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif etc.).

If anyone can provide some information regarding this issue that would be nice http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif.

WereSnowleopard
12-11-2004, 10:34 AM
Hand Sign Language.

CRSutton
12-11-2004, 11:10 AM
Dunno for sure except that radios were pretty much a non factor for Japanese fighter pilots. Many early war models did not have them and even though later planes were designed with radios, the equipment was so unreliable and hampered by shortages of spare parts that many pilots had the radios removed to save weight. The lack of reliable radio communications was a serious tactical liability. Against, even slightly inferior fighters the lack of radio communication put the Japanese at a tactical disadvantage in any phase of an air battle but the intial meeting part.

Allied radios suffered as well in the tropics but better quality, service and parts availability at least ensured that most Allied fighters had working radios in combat.

It was like sending them to war with wooden rifles.

Maasi
12-11-2004, 11:52 AM
Somebody told that they didināĀ“t have parachutes either in early war. Nice odds, no radios no parachutes...

J30Vader
12-11-2004, 01:58 PM
They did have them. Most pilots didn't use them as they restricted movement in an already small cockpit.

The fact that bailing out over enemy territory leading to capture was a factor as well. But as they fought more and more over their own territory, they used parachutes.

Maasi
12-11-2004, 06:48 PM
I bet that no parachute put some extra effort to ones flying skills too http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/59.gif

Maj_Death
12-11-2004, 06:58 PM
Radio silence is an option in the FMB for each individual waypoint. 1C appearently set the missions so that you fly radio silent for all waypoints except landing. Why they did this I do not know. If the plane didn't have a radio it didn't have a radio. I don't think the japs teleported radios to their planes whenever they neared a base afterall. But I could be wrong http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/35.gif. I'd list this "feature" as a bug in the campaign engine, you should not have access to the radio at any waypoint in some planes and time periods.

Atomic_Marten
12-11-2004, 07:25 PM
Yes, this must be some kind of bug.

And thus we have some errors; the biggest is that this 'radio silence' is not functional when you are close to base (this happens every time), so this must be because the last waypoint is not 'radio silenced'.

Of other bugs, I can regularly hear chatter of Australian pilots (and take advantage of that BTW http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif), that should be impossible also.

But since the 'lack of radioes' was obviously simulated in game as 'radio silence' thru some waypoints, this issue appears.

Whether it is possible to remove chatter completely (disable hearing enemy freq. as well as own completely), I do not know..

Stiglr
12-11-2004, 08:17 PM
In researching Japanese fighters as early as Claude and Nate, BOTH had radios. Nate had a radio, an amp and, a separate box to transmit on the other side of the cockpit. Sally had a big ol' bank of radio gear on the starboard side of the cockpit.

So they were equipped. Quality, of course, might be an issue, and the weight of early "wireless" equipment got them chucked out of many American designs. So, with the Japanese obsession with tight turning, light planes, they may have been the first to go.

Tully__
12-11-2004, 11:07 PM
I've read that they radios were often removed from Japanese aircraft to save weight. As Stig points out, many WW2 radio sets had the transmitter & receiver as seperate units, so maybe you've still got your receiver on board....

As for communication within sight of home base, most airfields used visual signals (flags, lights, flares & smoke) for traffic control instead of or as a back up to radio, perhaps having comms come back at the last waypoint is intended to simulate this http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Atomic_Marten
12-12-2004, 04:34 AM
Guys thanks for your answers. Things about this issue has become more clear now. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Well, if I can't use radio as a transmitter in my campaign, I can use it as a message receiver therefore I can still hear friendly and enemy(http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/icon_twisted.gif) chatter, so it is not so bad after all...

ElAurens
12-12-2004, 06:30 AM
Inspection of many downed Japanese aircraft found them to have American radio sets that were purchased before the war started. But, as been pointed out earlier, many went up without them.

Very similar to Russian aircraft early in the war.

Saburo_0
12-13-2004, 07:03 AM
Many Japanese radios had limited range, so you have to be close to base to contact them.

flight leaders frequently were the only ones to have both a receiver & a transmitter. If you are leading a 3 aircraft formation your wingmen can hear you but not reply. Try giving them the loosen formation command for ex. They will increase seperation but can't transmit a reply.
It's a very nice touch IMHO, great attention to detail.

Atomic_Marten
12-13-2004, 01:28 PM
Saburo thx. I will try that out. I often got to command second part(3 a/c's) of main 6a/c formation.(I may choose the weapon loadouts, and also level of fuel for my group).

Saburo_0
12-14-2004, 12:03 AM
Well there aren't a whole lot of loadout options for the Ki-43s but that Cover Me ^#%@@%^! command comes in handy! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Happy flying!

Ps I always roll the canopy back for landings---you look way cooler that way. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

Ruy Horta
12-14-2004, 08:34 AM
Like the Russians there was often a receiver, but no transmitter. Only the formation leader would transmit.

The main aim for the IJN when designing the Zero was a good fighter with extremely long range, all other issues were secondary. Radio equipment, together with armor etc, would add to the weight, which would curb range.

As for parachutes, well they did have parachutes, very nice looking onces actually and extremely funky looking dingies as well. But with bailing almost meaning the same as capture (against Bushido) or a slow death (who wants that), most prefered the quick death of crashing with the a/c.

OTOH there are plenty of instances where IJN aircrew are rescued after bailing, ditching or forced landings if the circumstances allowed.

Ruy Horta
12-14-2004, 08:34 AM
Like the Russians there was often a receiver, but no transmitter. Only the formation leader would transmit.

The main aim for the IJN when designing the Zero was a good fighter with extremely long range, all other issues were secondary. Radio equipment, together with armor etc, would add to the weight, which would curb range.

As for parachutes, well they did have parachutes, very nice looking ones actually and extremely funky looking dingies as well. But with bailing almost meaning the same as capture (against Bushido) or a slow death (who wants that), most prefered the quick death of crashing with the a/c.

OTOH there are plenty of instances where IJN aircrew are rescued after bailing, ditching or forced landings if the circumstances allowed.