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deskpilot
09-23-2008, 05:03 AM
Ok, VERY basic skill, but I'm in the hurricane and just trying to be able to keep at a constant compass bearing is proving difficult. Partly because of single engine planes tendancy to keep rolling because of the torque reaction I guess. (this is even worse in the powerful tempest) Any tips for just being able to fly at a constant heading? do I need to trim ailerons? only one of thre guides here suggested aileron trim was not really necessary. By the way, I have a very basic joystick, the logitech atrtack 3 with no proper rudder or even a hat switch, so please don't assume I've anything fancy controls wise.

Jex_TE
09-23-2008, 05:36 AM
From what I've read here, and I'm by no means an expert, you need to trim the rudder and elevators for straight flight. I don't think the german planes have rudder trim though.

M_Gunz
09-23-2008, 06:13 AM
Then it's okay that he's flying a Hurricane?

Afterhours
09-23-2008, 06:30 AM
This is just a matter of practice, just like driving a car on the highway.

When you are a new driver, all you think and worry about are the basics like going straight, stopping and such, but after a short time you are driving down the highway fiddling with your radio a map and a cell phone and the car goes straight without you even thinking about it.

The same will happen with flying this sim. I usually fly axis craft that do not even have aileron trim, but I find myself subconsciously compensating for it without a thought and the aircraft goes straight as an arrow....

M_Gunz
09-23-2008, 06:37 AM
To be able to trim it you need to be able to fly it. If you have to hold the stick back to
fly level then you trim nose up and loosen on your joystick just enough to stay level until
you are flying level without holding the joystick back. Same goes for rudder and aileron.
Trim till there's no force on the stick or rudder and (also when) you are flying coordinated.
It's a good time to notice your IAS if you also know your trim setting to remember.

OMK_Hand
09-23-2008, 05:24 PM
Hi deskpilot.

In the Hurricane, as with most other types, if you reduce power to appropriate settings for cruising you'll have an easier time controlling things, burn less fuel, often travel almost as quickly as you would using higher power settings, and stay nice and cool ready for a fight.

For the Hurricane II, cruising at 2660 rpm (75%) and +7 boost (77%)
(or if you've a long way to go 1800 rpm (50% approx) +4 boost) does the trick.

Level out from your climb (2850 (90%) +9 (90%) at 121.6 knots), allow the speed to increase as much as it will, close your radiator, reduce boost then rpm to cruise settings, trim the elevator first, then the rudder, and away you go.
Nice and steady, whizzing along.
Works for me, anyhow http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

(Generally speaking. Things get a little more complicated at high altitude. Also, depending on altitude the boost % settings above may differ. Best to use the gauge in the cockpit rather than the reported throttle %)

Kettenhunde
09-23-2008, 09:25 PM
you need to trim the rudder

You do not need rudder trim to maintain level flight.

FYI all German aircraft have elevator trim as well.

Owlsphone
09-23-2008, 11:40 PM
An even easier method that is taught to real pilots is to fly outside the airplane, not in it.

Pick a point on the horizon (town, river intersection, mountain peak) straight ahead along your heading and just fly towards it.

This will keep your eyes outside the cockpit and will also help keep you alert for the enemy.

struth
09-23-2008, 11:44 PM
The ultimate VFR!

works well below any clouds.

M_Gunz
09-23-2008, 11:54 PM
Originally posted by Jex_TE:
From what I've read here, and I'm by no means an expert, you need to trim the rudder and elevators for straight flight. I don't think the german planes have rudder trim though.

109 did but the pilot couldn't change it. It's ground-settable for a certain speed. Bend the
metal a bit to change it. Fly close to that speed at the proper engine and prop settings for
level cruise at that speed and the rudder should be in trim.

The rest of the time it's one leg or the other to hold the ball centered depending on changes
in speed, prop, engine.

WTE_Galway
09-24-2008, 12:06 AM
Originally posted by M_Gunz:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Jex_TE:
From what I've read here, and I'm by no means an expert, you need to trim the rudder and elevators for straight flight. I don't think the german planes have rudder trim though.

109 did but the pilot couldn't change it. It's ground-settable for a certain speed. Bend the
metal a bit to change it. Fly close to that speed at the proper engine and prop settings for
level cruise at that speed and the rudder should be in trim.

The rest of the time it's one leg or the other to hold the ball centered depending on changes
in speed, prop, engine. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


yessum, and guess what speed I used to strafe at in 109 JABO missions http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif