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View Full Version : Short? Tubby? Eat red meat? Have high blood pressure? Then you are good too go!



Waldo.Pepper
04-08-2009, 03:39 PM
Some salty talk in this video so it maybe NWS.

http://www.dailymotion.com/sea...pulling-7-gs_extreme (http://www.dailymotion.com/search/First+Time+Pulling+7+Gs/video/xc99q_first-time-pulling-7-gs_extreme)

Tall skinny guys have no chance. I am 6'4" tall and I weight less than what my Doctor wants! So I am a goner then. Sadly (for this purpose at least) I am not short and tubby.

Waldo.Pepper
04-08-2009, 03:39 PM
Some salty talk in this video so it maybe NWS.

http://www.dailymotion.com/sea...pulling-7-gs_extreme (http://www.dailymotion.com/search/First+Time+Pulling+7+Gs/video/xc99q_first-time-pulling-7-gs_extreme)

Tall skinny guys have no chance. I am 6'4" tall and I weight less than what my Doctor wants! So I am a goner then. Sadly (for this purpose at least) I am not short and tubby.

raaaid
04-08-2009, 04:13 PM
thtas something i thought myself, couldnt pilots stand in ww11 a special diet to have high blood pressure like lots of salt

F0_Dark_P
04-08-2009, 04:32 PM
Hehe funny video http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

wonder how i would fare.. short and skinny http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

GloDark7
04-08-2009, 05:03 PM
You seen this one?

He fights it but is away with the fairy's 3 times!

Very funny http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

F-18 video (http://digg.com/d1T86p)

TX-EcoDragon
04-08-2009, 05:31 PM
Well, I'm a vegan 6'2 aerobatic pilot whos is good for around +11G and -6G on good days (the + I can always do after a warmup, but the negative side is more variable). OK so I'm not skinny, but my bp is normal!

Though it makes for an entertaining soundbyte, and does have some merit for +G, conditioning yourself works much better overall!

You just can't escape that fact that you still need fitness to continue pulling those high Gs without undue fatigue and physiological stress. Sitting in a centrifuge, or doing one or two break turns isn't the same as dealing with repeated high G levels throughout a day like some must endure, especially in the cases of pilots who also use negative Gs. It might be a little more accurate for those jet jocks that don't push negative G's at all since in that case you now need low blood pressure in your upper body, and even so it gets really painful, and dangerous if you donít handle it carefully.

Those folks with the high blood pressure and poor cardiovascular fitness will be screaming by -2Gs. . .plus G is easy in comparison since provided you get your anti-G straining going, and can tough it out, most will do OK in +5G range, at least for a short while (and assuming they didn't jsut push negative Gs). Ideally they have some recent exposure and good fitness and muscle control to withstand repeated exposure and higher levels of +G, but negative G is an entirely different issue of pain, and dangerous consequences (i.e. the -G itself is dangerous, not just an ensuing crash - unlike + G), and getting yourself to relax is particularly hard when pushing those - Gs. An aerobatic pilot will see many multiples of negative G, and will quickly lose ĖG tolerance, but I can come back after the winter and pull much of what I could in the Fall, but pushing is back to square one for a few weeks. . .and it NEVER gets all that comfortable beyond -2.

The smartest way to incorporate the knowledge about the distance from heart to your head is to recline the seats of the aircraft rather than eating at Arbyís everyday. This makes the vertical component of the distance from the heart to the brain effectively shorter, which aids in + G tolerance, but not only that, it also reduces the effects of - G to some extent as well by offsetting the axis that the G acts relative to your body.