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MikerBiker
01-09-2005, 12:53 PM
1. Most of japans pilots did not have parachutes .
2. While taking off in a Fighter plane it was common to have the canopy opened just in case of a take off crash ,that way You may be able to crawl out cause the sliding canopy was not closed and the sliding tracts damaged.
3 Did you know that a P51 was a P cause it was a Pursuit plane , a F4 was a Fighter , a B17 was a Bomber , a AT 6 was a Advanced Trainer , a BT 13 was a Basic Trainer ,and a Pt 17 was a Primary Trainer
4 And i am not sure as what PBY...SDB....and a few other of American Aircraft designations were..may you know a few more?....well any way...i wanted to pass this info on.
Crash.....of......43
Capt Glenn.
ps... Just thought of one more The main thing that gave a ZERO a great big edge over American planes was the fact that the fuel tank was located behind the engine, that made that plane very "Aerobatic" in Combat and it also if the fuel tank was hit made a very firey ending for the pilot.
(if i have made any mistakes here please tell me..Thanks)

MikerBiker
01-09-2005, 12:53 PM
1. Most of japans pilots did not have parachutes .
2. While taking off in a Fighter plane it was common to have the canopy opened just in case of a take off crash ,that way You may be able to crawl out cause the sliding canopy was not closed and the sliding tracts damaged.
3 Did you know that a P51 was a P cause it was a Pursuit plane , a F4 was a Fighter , a B17 was a Bomber , a AT 6 was a Advanced Trainer , a BT 13 was a Basic Trainer ,and a Pt 17 was a Primary Trainer
4 And i am not sure as what PBY...SDB....and a few other of American Aircraft designations were..may you know a few more?....well any way...i wanted to pass this info on.
Crash.....of......43
Capt Glenn.
ps... Just thought of one more The main thing that gave a ZERO a great big edge over American planes was the fact that the fuel tank was located behind the engine, that made that plane very "Aerobatic" in Combat and it also if the fuel tank was hit made a very firey ending for the pilot.
(if i have made any mistakes here please tell me..Thanks)

Slechtvalk
01-09-2005, 02:24 PM
Nice info, thanks http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Taylortony
01-09-2005, 04:35 PM
P = Patrol
B = Bomber
Y = Consolidated Aircraft Corp.

SDB is a Dive Bomber i Presume the S is the maker

P for pursuit was replaced by F for fighter to more reflect their role..

A as in A1 skyraider is attack CH as in Chinook is cargo helicopter AH as in Apache is attack helicopter OV as in Kiowa is observation Helicopter
C as in C130 herc is cargo
Uh as in iroquois helicopter is utility helicopter


An add on to your post current ones below

All US Army Helipcopters are named after Indian tribes Kiowa Apache Chinook Cheyenne

All Us Fighters are named after Birds Of Pray
Eagle Falcon Raptor

All British Main battle tanks are named with the letter C
Cromwell Centurian Chieftian Churchill

berg417448
01-09-2005, 04:39 PM
SBD is Scout Bomber (SB) made by Douglas (D) Since there is no number before the D it was the first Scout Bomber produced by Douglas.

For example, the SB2C Helldiver was the 2nd SB produced by Curtiss (C).

Blackdog5555
01-10-2005, 01:30 AM
F4U ...U= Chance Vought
F4F ...F= Grumman
PBY ....P=patrol B=bomber Y= ryan
TBM .......T=torpedo;B=bomber;M= General Motors

Skarphol
01-10-2005, 01:47 AM
The PBY series (Catalina in RAF service) was built by Consolidated, thus Y=Consolidated, in this case..
To make a complicated system even worse, the same letter was assigned to several manufacturers. And to make the confusion complete, an airplane built by different manufacturers had different designations, like the Corsair wich was named F4U if it was built by Vought, FG if it was built by General Motors and F2A if it was built by Brewster. Further, the Avenger was designed and built by Grumman as TBF and built under license by General Motors as TBM.

This whole system was discontinued in 1962 when the the 3-service designationsystem was introduced. All planes where given a letter (or combination of letters) that indicated their purpose, and a number wich identified the aircraft. An example is the McDonnel Phantom that was designated F4H in the navy and F-110 in the airforce was redesignated F-4.

Skarphol

ImpStarDuece
01-10-2005, 02:26 AM
Saburo Saiki states in 'Samurai' that the IJN (Imperial Japanese Navy) pilots DID have parachutes but frequently chose not to wear them. This was in keeping with the "Bushido" or warrior code that most Japanese soliders had drilled into them, not only in their training but through most of their lives.

For the Japanese armed forces the concept of surrender was something of an anethma. The idea of 'prisoner of war' almost didn't exist. Someone who would not die for their contry or emperor/ruler was beneath contempt (there are several choice Japanese terms that were used). So for a samurai of the sky, bailing out of a stricken plane simply wasn't a mental option. Something similar to the saying "come home with your shield or on it".

Saiki states that Japnese pilots WERE issued parachutes and did sometimes carry them into battle. However, despite the cultural barriers to their use, Japanese pilots felt that they were an encumberance in a cramped cockpit, made long flights difficult, added weight and were generally a nusicance. Some units were ordered by their commanding offficers to carry the paracutes but it was one of the few areas where Japanese pilots would not follow orders to the letter or even in spirit. Even if required to take paracutes up many pilots simply chose a suicide plunge in the hope of causing maximum damage and selling thier own lives as dearly as possible.

Kongo Otto
01-10-2005, 08:42 AM
A japanese Samurai Haiku says:
after the battle you should come back with the head of your enemy in your hands or without your own.

BM357_TinMan
01-10-2005, 10:47 AM
Seems to me that the Navy had the best designation system. It is too bad it was abandoned.

berg417448
01-10-2005, 11:07 AM
The Japanese navy used a similar system.

For example: A6M2

A = Carrier-borne fighter
6 = 6th in service
M = Mitsubishi
2 = 2nd variant of the design to be produced

Daiichidoku
01-10-2005, 11:18 AM
Up to, and during WWII, USAAF used P designation fo rfighters , or "pursuit"...but during the same time, they had "F" designations, flr "photo-recon" types, like the P 38 recce being F-5, P51 recce F-6, and so on

Thenb theres the B and A designations....
we all know the B 26 was the Martin Marauder, and flew at the same time as the A-26 Douglas Invader.....not long after the war, (or was it just befor ethe end? can someone clarify, plz) the "A" became "B", making the Douglas Invader a B-26

IMO the Germans and British had the best nomeclature systems

Germans=Manufacterer type, Variant, sub variant
British=Nickname (in most cases), variant (mark no.), sub-variant

Skarphol
01-10-2005, 11:36 AM
It was in 1948 that the airforce decided to abandon the A- designation. By the time the only 'A-types', Douglas A-24 Dauntless and Douglas A-26 Invader was in service, and these where redesignated F-24 and B-26 respectively. There was little chance for in-service confusion as the Martin B-26 Marauder was out of service, and there had never been an F-24 before.

When American forces first began to get involved in combat in Vietnam--at first only as advisers--B-26Bs and B-26Cs went into action in the counterinsurgency role with the Farm Gate detachment. Unfortunately, by this time the B-26s were nearing the end of their service lives and suffered from frequent wing failures, forcing them out of service. Those few that remained active were provided with a strengthening wing strap along the bottom of the wing spars to prevent catastrophic wing failures and prolong service life. The success of these modifications led the USAF to order a remanufactured version of the Invader from the On Mark Engineering Company of Van Nuys, California that would be specifically adapted to the counterinsurgency role. The designation B-26K was applied and the name Counter Invader was chosen.

The B-26K Counter Invaders were delivered to the USAF between June 1964 and April 1965. They served with the 603rd Special Operations Squadron based at Lockbourne AFB and Hurlburt AFB in the operational training role, and with the 606th Air Commando Squadron (later renamed the 609th Special Operations Squadron) from Nakhon Phanom Air Base in Thailand. During the mid-1960s, Thailand did not permit the basing of bombers on its territory, and so the aircraft were reassigned the old attack designation of A-26A, thus bringing the Invader full-circle. The A-26As flew night interdiction missions over the Ho Chi Minh trail until they were phased out of service in November of 1969, finally bringing the era of Invader combat service with the USAF to a close.

This is taken from the fascinating pages of Joe Baugher.

Skarphol