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Lurch1962
07-19-2007, 09:02 PM
Another thread chronicling a recent rudder pedal convert's trials and tribulations in adapting to his new controller prompted me to write this...

Among all rudder pedals that I know of, the action is patterned more-or-less after the real thing, but here are some of the problems encountered among the more commonly available variety:

1) Narrow foot placement (feels like using the Suzanne Somers thigh excersiser).
2) Tend to "walk" over the floor if not anchored.
3) Difficulty in sensing the neutral, or center position.
4) Can be hard to precisely deflect due to the long distance between knees and feet. In other words, a scissoring action which has much of the pivoting occurring at the knees makes it hard to precisely place the feet. This is more of a problem for those of us who sit in an upright position--reclined seats allow more of a pumping action of the legs, which is a tad better.


Here's what I did to alleviate all of the above. Instead of making a pedal which has the usual fore-aft "sliding" motion, I made one which:
1) pivots vertically (no sliding over the floor),
2) has a fairly wide foot placement of 1.5 feet, and
3) is gear-reduced by a 3:1 ratio, so that the +/- 30 degree potentiometer is still using its full range of motion, but over a much more comfortable +/- 10 degree pivoting action.

The heart of the device is a ball bearing arbour and 3/4-inch steel shaft. The foot board is 3/4-inch plywood with cutouts for my feet. The larger gear is an anti-backlash type made of two spring-loaded phenolic disks. Centering is effected by two opposing, stout springs which provide a very crisp and definite action, but which does not cause a "bump" when crossing center when both feet are resting comfortably.

In use, my heels rest on raised foam supports, and I simply press downward with one or the other ball of the foot. Rudder action is *very* precise because both feet are always fixed in place, as opposed to the indefinite "floating" of the feet with the usual arrangement. This is augmented by the strength of the calf muscles, combined with the short ankle-to-ball of foot distance. I adapted to this method of rudder control in a very short time, in part because the pushing down action to slew the nose is more intuitive than pushing forward.

I should upload a picture of this (and my monitor support which puts the screen at face level and ~1 foot away), when I can get get hold of a digital camera.

--Lurch--

Lurch1962
07-19-2007, 09:02 PM
Another thread chronicling a recent rudder pedal convert's trials and tribulations in adapting to his new controller prompted me to write this...

Among all rudder pedals that I know of, the action is patterned more-or-less after the real thing, but here are some of the problems encountered among the more commonly available variety:

1) Narrow foot placement (feels like using the Suzanne Somers thigh excersiser).
2) Tend to "walk" over the floor if not anchored.
3) Difficulty in sensing the neutral, or center position.
4) Can be hard to precisely deflect due to the long distance between knees and feet. In other words, a scissoring action which has much of the pivoting occurring at the knees makes it hard to precisely place the feet. This is more of a problem for those of us who sit in an upright position--reclined seats allow more of a pumping action of the legs, which is a tad better.


Here's what I did to alleviate all of the above. Instead of making a pedal which has the usual fore-aft "sliding" motion, I made one which:
1) pivots vertically (no sliding over the floor),
2) has a fairly wide foot placement of 1.5 feet, and
3) is gear-reduced by a 3:1 ratio, so that the +/- 30 degree potentiometer is still using its full range of motion, but over a much more comfortable +/- 10 degree pivoting action.

The heart of the device is a ball bearing arbour and 3/4-inch steel shaft. The foot board is 3/4-inch plywood with cutouts for my feet. The larger gear is an anti-backlash type made of two spring-loaded phenolic disks. Centering is effected by two opposing, stout springs which provide a very crisp and definite action, but which does not cause a "bump" when crossing center when both feet are resting comfortably.

In use, my heels rest on raised foam supports, and I simply press downward with one or the other ball of the foot. Rudder action is *very* precise because both feet are always fixed in place, as opposed to the indefinite "floating" of the feet with the usual arrangement. This is augmented by the strength of the calf muscles, combined with the short ankle-to-ball of foot distance. I adapted to this method of rudder control in a very short time, in part because the pushing down action to slew the nose is more intuitive than pushing forward.

I should upload a picture of this (and my monitor support which puts the screen at face level and ~1 foot away), when I can get get hold of a digital camera.

--Lurch--

TSmoke
07-19-2007, 09:13 PM
Now those would be very interesting to see.

Impossible to find pedals here, and the wife screams every time I order anything on-line. So glad I'm gonna be wearing hearing aids, at least then I have a legit excuse LOL.

FoolTrottel
07-19-2007, 11:43 PM
Yes, we want to see pictures of it!
(Or a drawing http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif)

Capt.LoneRanger
07-20-2007, 12:02 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by FoolTrottel:
Yes, we want to see pictures of it!
(Or a drawing http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/agreepost.gif

slo_1_2_3
07-20-2007, 01:21 AM
Remember mine?

rnzoli
07-20-2007, 03:55 AM
Yes, slo_1_2_3, I remember yours!!!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif
Do you have a picture still somewhere available?
Do you still use it?

In any case, I think your pedals were a great encouragement to community members. I mean everybody said "There's no way I can't do something that at least looks better". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

IMO your courage and determination to get one pedal going was remarkable, I saluted to your efforts to get it going.

rnzoli
07-20-2007, 03:57 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">1) pivots vertically (no sliding over the floor), </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
Well, I guess there goes the toe-braking possibility then? http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

spacefrogs
07-20-2007, 04:29 AM
Just because my wife is also screaming when I order something online and due to short of money and luck of time to build my own pedals I´m using another method that maybe helpful to some. I use the pedals of a Logitech Driving Force driving wheel. It´s not the perfect solution but since I got it, costs nothing and it´s still better that twisting the joystick.

slo_1_2_3
07-21-2007, 01:38 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by rnzoli:
Yes, slo_1_2_3, I remember yours!!!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/heart.gif
Do you have a picture still somewhere available?
Do you still use it?

In any case, I think your pedals were a great encouragement to community members. I mean everybody said "There's no way I can't do something that at least looks better". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif

IMO your courage and determination to get one pedal going was remarkable, I saluted to your efforts to get it going. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

these are the first ones I made ,
sexy as a dead cat ,no?
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c110/slo123/p3.jpg
and here the "upgraded ones"
I can't use them anymore the joystick pooped out

http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c110/slo123/ped1.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c110/slo123/ped.jpg