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View Full Version : Cheap, but decent pedals



Eow_TK
09-23-2009, 04:26 PM
I dont have much money to invest, but I want to get some rudder pedals. Anyone know of some decent but cheap pedals I could buy? Thanks.

WTE_Galway
09-23-2009, 05:26 PM
I use CH PRO and they work OK.

Occasionally a flimsy wire connected to the break pedals snaps and needs resoldering or the brakes stop working ... but other than that they have been pretty reliable.

julian265
09-23-2009, 05:34 PM
Originally posted by Eow_TK:
I dont have much money to invest, but I want to get some rudder pedals. Anyone know of some decent but cheap pedals I could buy? Thanks.

How are you with a small amount of metal work and some wiring?

Eow_TK
09-23-2009, 07:11 PM
Im pretty good with stuff like that. Especially metal working.

Waldo.Pepper
09-23-2009, 08:06 PM
ebay. I bought gameport model. Still using them with a converter to usb. Cheap as Chips.

Eow_TK
09-23-2009, 09:41 PM
tried finding some at ebay for the last hour and a half, but couldnt find anything that wasnt really expensive. i would like to find used ones for maybe 20-40 dollars

Waldo.Pepper
09-23-2009, 09:45 PM
Took me 30 seconds. CH USB $45

http://cgi.ebay.com/CH-Pro-Rud..._trksid=p3286.c0.m14 (http://cgi.ebay.com/CH-Pro-Rudder-USB-Flight-Sim-Pedals-PPU995_W0QQitemZ270458759125QQcmdZViewItemQQptZPCA _Joysticks_Game_Controllers?hash=item3ef89927d5&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14)

Stiletto-
09-23-2009, 10:37 PM
6 Dollars

http://cgi.ebay.com/Microsoft-..._trksid=p3286.c0.m14 (http://cgi.ebay.com/Microsoft-Sidewinder-Precision-Racing-Wheel-Pedals-USB_W0QQitemZ380158149625QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_Def aultDomain_0?hash=item58833103f9&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14)

julian265
09-24-2009, 01:15 AM
Originally posted by Eow_TK:
Im pretty good with stuff like that. Especially metal working.

Give me a yell if you'd like to make your own. The most expensive part would be the USB interface, but that give you up to 8 axes and 32 buttons, if you'd like to expand later...

Tully__
09-24-2009, 03:40 AM
Originally posted by julian265:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Eow_TK:
Im pretty good with stuff like that. Especially metal working.

Give me a yell if you'd like to make your own. The most expensive part would be the USB interface, but that give you up to 8 axes and 32 buttons, if you'd like to expand later... </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

The most expensive part is the $15 two or three axis joystick you buy at walmart to scavenge the USB interface out of http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Eow_TK
09-24-2009, 04:19 PM
I have that old joy stick i could use for that. i have the pots from it still, but in order to use the interface thing, i would need to give up my flap control lever. but it would be worth it since thats all i use it for. ill try making my own, if anyone wants to help me through it

julian265
09-24-2009, 04:39 PM
Tully is right, if you don't mind 8 bit resolution.

Eow_TK, if you are currently using one of the axes of a spare stick's board, you can put the pedals as another input to this board.

You can keep using it for flaps, but also put use its X/Y or Z axis for your pedals.

If you're interested in hall effect angular sensing, look here:
http://www.jpfiles.com/hardware/uni_stick.pdf

But as for your pedals, mine are as simple as this:
http://www.jpfiles.com/hardware/pedals2.jpg

And the hall effect sensor is this: (but you can use a pot if you want).
http://www.jpfiles.com/hardware/pedal_sensor.jpg

If you're building pedals yourself, you can go as far as you want with them. As you can see, mine are really simple, and made from a few bolts, and aluminium C extrusion, and a few bearings. A lazy susan bearing is probably the simplest to use.

Some people use a four bar linkage design to keep the pedals parallel, and most use a spring for self-centering.

VMF-214_HaVoK
09-24-2009, 04:42 PM
CH Pro is what I use. Hardly cheap coming in at 100 bucks but I have seen good deals on Ebay. Good luck in your hunt. Learning to fly with pedals will change your game dramatically for the better IMHO.

S!

Eow_TK
09-24-2009, 04:52 PM
Ill give it a shot. How much do Hall sensors cost? are they simpler to install and use?

squareusr
09-24-2009, 05:09 PM
Easiest homebrew pedal is probably a construction based on a BU368, drawer rails, bowden wires (one "U" on the heel end, connecting push to pull and two "U"s or "S"s on the toe end, connecting to a shared pull spring) and optical range detection with a voltage divider circuit like rnzoli's design (http://web.t-online.hu/rnzoli/optical-circuit.jpg) (works like a charm for the linear movement of a rail-based pedal). The big advantage of the optical range pickup is that it measures the actual movement of the pedals and is not mediated by some mechanism which would always suffer from play.

It won't have toe brakes, but that's better mapped to an actual brake lever on the stick, like all the cool red planes had http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

edit: those hall sensors cost a few cent each and are much easier to use than pots because you only need to position them "somewhere" where the field from your magnet/magnets changes seriously when your device is moved, while pots need perfect alignment, fit and mechanical a mechanical connection to both the moving part and the fixed part that can stand a little force, with zero play. Hall effect sensors on the other hand only have to be fixed to one side and only need the structural strength to support their weight, which is totally negligible. For my stick axes i simply attached pairs of magnets to moving steel parts so that they form a "U-magnet" with the steel (using their own magnetic stickyness) while the sensor is fixed roughly over/between them, then i adjusted the position of the magnets for perfect trim. Only months later i bothered to add some glue to the magnets, so i won't kick them off their positions so easily (happened, with the entertaining side effect of an inverted elevater axis when i accidentally mixed up the sides). Compare that to a pot construction, there everything has to fit rigidly, without any chance for correction. (optical voltage divider, on the other hand... the long movement of pedals can't be sensed by hall effect sensors without mechanical mediation...)

Price-wise, LED diodes/emitters for a voltage divider are also in the same two-figure cent range of hall effect sensors, but you'd need a total of four of them for a voltage divider plus a few resistors and ideally a trim pot, while a single hall sensor will do per axis, if you don't account for a small supply of "supermagnets".

Eow_TK
09-24-2009, 05:23 PM
i already designed a simple plan that im going to try. it should be fairly quick and easy since i have all the materials