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BSS_Sniper
12-22-2008, 04:34 PM
Since I've been layed off from the airline, I've been working at my old job as a jump pilot flying for a skydiving place. Today I had an exciting day. I literally wasn't sure I'd live through it. On our jump run, one of our skydiver's reserve parachute prematurely deployed. the chute and lines ended up nearly ripping off my right elevator and jamming my rudder. It took full up trim and almost all of my strength to keep the nose up. I was on frequency with Tampa ATC and told them I needed to leave the freq to talk to my ground. I advised them that one of my jumpers hit the tail and I had a severe nose down attitude. They told me to change freqs and that they'd give me any help that they could.
I wear a parachute and considered bailing out and also considered going to a nearby airport that had fire/rescue. I ended up making an approach to my grass field. As I slowed for my approach, the nose down tendency worsened. However, as I lowered the flaps, it helped a little. I had to land at 20 knots faster than normal. Thankfully the crosswind that had been there all day was gone and I had wind straight down the runway. I landed just fine, hands shaking after I got out of the plane. Everyone, including the skydiver made it down fine. Just thought I'd share the experience.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSTp4mbtMQo

BSS_Sniper
12-22-2008, 04:34 PM
Since I've been layed off from the airline, I've been working at my old job as a jump pilot flying for a skydiving place. Today I had an exciting day. I literally wasn't sure I'd live through it. On our jump run, one of our skydiver's reserve parachute prematurely deployed. the chute and lines ended up nearly ripping off my right elevator and jamming my rudder. It took full up trim and almost all of my strength to keep the nose up. I was on frequency with Tampa ATC and told them I needed to leave the freq to talk to my ground. I advised them that one of my jumpers hit the tail and I had a severe nose down attitude. They told me to change freqs and that they'd give me any help that they could.
I wear a parachute and considered bailing out and also considered going to a nearby airport that had fire/rescue. I ended up making an approach to my grass field. As I slowed for my approach, the nose down tendency worsened. However, as I lowered the flaps, it helped a little. I had to land at 20 knots faster than normal. Thankfully the crosswind that had been there all day was gone and I had wind straight down the runway. I landed just fine, hands shaking after I got out of the plane. Everyone, including the skydiver made it down fine. Just thought I'd share the experience.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSTp4mbtMQo

Kettenhunde
12-22-2008, 05:12 PM
I did not see the video but it sounds like the pucker factor was off the scale.

Glad to know you made it, good job on saving the plane, and great job on saving yourself.

BSS_Sniper
12-22-2008, 05:18 PM
Thanks, there was certainly a pucker factor.

M_Gunz
12-22-2008, 06:24 PM
Coulda bailed, saved the plane, does your jock strap have suspenders?

LEBillfish
12-22-2008, 06:30 PM
Sooooo.....All that flying of IL2 & having your elevators shot off saved your life!....I knew I could be a fighter ace after flying this sim!
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........then again...Maybe not http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif Corngrats on the safe landing.

K2

Viper2005_
12-22-2008, 06:32 PM
Sounds nasty. Presumably all the unaffected skydivers got out whilst you were still at altitude? What happened to the guy who'd wrapped his reserve round the tail?

I couldn't view the video because youtube says it's private.

I've seen some videos of similar incidents in the past; it seems to me that if you mix sky-divers with side doors for long enough, this sort of incident is inevitable.

I hope you didn't have to buy your beer tonight!

WTE_Galway
12-22-2008, 06:36 PM
Was it a faulty ADD firing off .. a Cyprus or somesuch ???

or did they somehow snag and pull the emergency cord themselves ???

Zeus-cat
12-22-2008, 06:50 PM
Glad everything worked out. Sounds like you a re a very good pilot.

BSS_Sniper
12-22-2008, 08:23 PM
Sorry about the video being private. I fixed it.

It wasn't a faulty ADD. The ball on the end of the cable that attaches to the reserve handle actually got caught in the door. As he exited and got into position to jump with our tandem, it pulled the reserve. He had a few large holes in his canopy, no broken lines. He had a stand up landing.

BSS_Sniper
12-22-2008, 08:25 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LEBillfish:
Sooooo.....All that flying of IL2 & having your elevators shot off saved your life!....I knew I could be a fighter ace after flying this sim!
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........then again...Maybe not http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif Corngrats on the safe landing.

K2 </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

To be perfectly honest, after I tested my controls at altitude, IL2 and the many times I landed all shot up did cross my mind. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

RPMcMurphy
12-22-2008, 08:39 PM
Amazing, it looks like the right-side elevator being bent upward caused the difficulty in keeping the nose up in that it may have forced the left elevator down by working like a giant macabre twisted-up trim tab.

BSS_Sniper
12-23-2008, 08:47 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by RPMcMurphy:
Amazing, it looks like the right-side elevator being bent upward caused the difficulty in keeping the nose up in that it may have forced the left elevator down by working like a giant macabre twisted-up trim tab. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thats pretty much the what happened.

rnzoli
12-23-2008, 01:13 PM
Wow. When you made the approach, did you have a "plan B" as well, in case it is impossible to control the aircraft at low speeds?

Trying to imagine the situation, I would have been keeping my hands on the throttle, ready to accelerate and climb to safe bail out altitude.

BSS_Sniper
12-23-2008, 03:39 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by rnzoli:
Wow. When you made the approach, did you have a "plan B" as well, in case it is impossible to control the aircraft at low speeds?

Trying to imagine the situation, I would have been keeping my hands on the throttle, ready to accelerate and climb to safe bail out altitude. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Plan B was to go to a larger field that had fire/rescue

Plan C was to climb and bail

mortoma
12-23-2008, 10:06 PM
I would not want to fly anything in Florida with all the traffic they have. Even flying in Indiana I had three close calls over a three year period. One of those was under control from Grissom Approach Control. I had a tendency to not fly under any control at all, not even flight following, because I got dropped a lot being VFR. In the midwest, controllers treat VFR flights like a red haired step child. And I never had any interest in IFR flying, not after taking a few instrument lessons anyway. IFR takes the fun out of flying unless you have a decent autopilot.

BSS_Sniper
12-23-2008, 10:10 PM
Yeah it gets busy where I fly, for the skydive company. It is right in the middle of an arrival for Tampa.

PhantomKira
12-28-2008, 11:57 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by M_Gunz:
Coulda bailed, saved the plane, does your jock strap have suspenders? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

You seem unaware of the pressures on a pilot to save the plane, sir. Believe me, one usually does everything in one's power to save yourself the hassle of having to buy an airplane off the owner. You signed for the aircraft, it's your responsibility, regardless.

I am a bit surprised that the pilot went back to his home field. Had it been me, I'd have gone to the field with ARFF capability. On the other hand, there's nothing like your home field. It's just comfortable.

Kettenhunde
12-29-2008, 05:55 AM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">You seem unaware of the pressures on a pilot to save the plane, sir. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well having made two forced landings myself, the thought of saving the airplane should not be foremost on any pilots mind.

You "save the airplane" in the context that it is necessary to be somewhat intact and controllable to reduce or eliminate further risk to human life.

A pilots thoughts are on getting to the ground without loss of the souls on board or innocents on the ground.

He does this by good ADM, cockpit management, and pilotage.

Everything on an airplane can be replaced with the exception of the occupants.

That is why we have insurance.

All the best,

Crumpp

bmoffa
12-29-2008, 07:37 AM
I just saw a similar event on TV a couple of days ago. It was on a twin engine plane and the jumper was hung on the left elevator for a minute or so. He managed to cut off and use his emergency shute. The other jumpers bailed while the first was still hung. The pilot landed the plane successfully.

Choctaw111
12-29-2008, 08:30 AM
That's amazing. That must have been quite a rush. Was the skydiver OK? Excellent work mate.

Thekid321
12-29-2008, 12:32 PM
This reminds me of a flight my dad had a couple years ago while he was taking lessons. We live in southwest wisconsin and fly out of Richland Center Airport. As some of you know, spring storms can be very sudden up here in the midwest. Well, he was just doing a normal pattern at 1000 feet AGL and there were some clouds. When he was on his downwind, he heard on the radio that a major storm was moving at about 35 mph straight towards the airport. Sure enough he looked out to the right of the 172 and there was a massive storm that according the weather station reached up to 10000 feet in some points heading right at the city. So he had to cut power drop full flaps and turn onto final about 1/4 of the normal distance and turn from downwind to final in one turn. He got down and by the time he taxied to parking there was a huge downpour with very low visibiliy.

This isn't nearly as bad as your story but I just wanted to bring it up.

Choctaw111
12-29-2008, 01:20 PM
I was going to say by the title of your thread, a bad day of flying... is better than a good day at work, but in your case the bad day of flying WAS your day at work...and that wasn't bad flying at all. Still a great job to bring her in that way.

WTE_Galway
12-29-2008, 03:15 PM
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by bmoffa:
The other jumpers bailed while the first was still hung. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Standard procedure above 500' when you have aircraft problems. Below 500' you stay in the plane for obvious reasons.

Warrington_Wolf
12-29-2008, 03:52 PM
I wouldn't call what happened a bad days flying, events beyond your control caused damage to the plane, yet you landed the damaged bird without any casualties either on board or anyone on the ground.
No casualties and an intact plane seems like a good result all round, you sir should be saluted for your handling of he situation http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif.