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XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 01:11 AM
Hey everyone. I know this belongs in the tech help section but unfortuantly I can't post there. Right now I'm trying sqeeze some extra performance out of my CPU. But I'm trying to figure out which would yield better results for overall speed in FB. Pumping up the front side bus, or the processor?

Here's what I'm running.
windows xp home
amd barton 2500
ati 9700 pro
512 2700 ddr

Tempature wise I think I'm pretty safe. It stays between 35 to 37 degres celius.

XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 01:11 AM
Hey everyone. I know this belongs in the tech help section but unfortuantly I can't post there. Right now I'm trying sqeeze some extra performance out of my CPU. But I'm trying to figure out which would yield better results for overall speed in FB. Pumping up the front side bus, or the processor?

Here's what I'm running.
windows xp home
amd barton 2500
ati 9700 pro
512 2700 ddr

Tempature wise I think I'm pretty safe. It stays between 35 to 37 degres celius.

ZG77_Nagual
07-10-2003, 01:15 AM
incrementally increase the front side bus - the multiplier on your cpu is probably locked - if you do a search on overclocking you'll find all kinds of stuff - you may also need to increase the core voltage. Your 9700 pro has overclocking potential too - go to www.rage3d.com (http://www.rage3d.com) and look in the tweakers and overclockers forum for how-tos on that. That site also has an overclocking utility for radeon cards called rage3dtweak.

http://pws.chartermi.net/~cmorey/pics/p47janes.jpg

XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 01:46 AM
Very slow in small steps, try 1 or 2 at a time through your BIOS. I would highly reccomend to check your processor core temp while you are doing this. Baby Steps.. Run your game and shadow a core temp program and keep it set for about 60 deg. celcius. If it exceeds that temp, then you are usually too high and the life of your processor will deminish, also check the stability of your programs, Overclocking is certainly a risk and you can do it right if you are careful. For Video cards, I highly recommend Powerstrip, It has been updated to handle the card which you own,(you did not hear this info from me) Good Luck

XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 01:59 AM
dont do it overclocking results in alot of program errors check overclocking reliability sites before you decide to do it


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XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 03:19 AM
best performance increase comes from FSB as that increases the clock speed on other components as well as the CPU but its likely to cause more problems as well (the other components may not like the extra speed)

Best option increse FSB gradually till you get best reliable FSB that gets no errors .. then see if you can also hit the multiplier to get a bit more out of it.


Do not expect to get the equivalent of the 4.5Ghz P4 you see on the net, those things are cooled by tanks of liquid nitrogen.

XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 03:27 AM
Thank for your help. My motherboard came with some overclocking tools in the bios. So I've tried overclocking the FSB by incriments of one's. From the stock 333 I've worked my way up to 344. So far no problems or crashs. And the temp is still around 37 degrees. I haven't tried benchmarking the change yet in FB so I plan on doing that next. And then compareing it to the stock fsb speed. After that I think ill try lowering it back to stock and see about overclocking the cpu.

XyZspineZyX
07-10-2003, 04:14 AM
Could you specify the stepping of your XP2500+, and the mainboard designation and Revision.
The stepping can be found on the CPU itself, there should be a label located on the Barton 2500 with three alphanumeric codes, i.e. AXDA3000DKV4D 9370444260002 AQUCA0303SPAW.http://www.viperlair.com/graphics/reviews/cpu_mobo/amd/2500xp/markings.jpg


If your mainboard does have an Nforce2 chipset, you don´t need to manually unlock your CPU to change the multiplicator, it can be overidden directly via the Bios settings. A mainboard that does support a stable 200Mhz FSB and PC 3200 DDR Ram are also recommended, so the mainboard and Ram don´t become limiting factors if you want to run at 200Mhz FSB.

If you intend to raise the FSB above nominal specs, it´s also important that your mainboard is able to lock the AGP and PCI bus frequencys, because overclocking the FSB also raises PCI/AGP frequency if they are not locked. Devices connected to these busses, like videocards, NIC´s, Soundcards etc. will most likely become unstable if PCI/AGP frequency is above specs. Dependant on the stepping of your CPU and the amount you intend to overclock, it does require raising of the Vcore voltage to a greater or lesser extend, which results in increased thermal output, be sure your heatsink/fan combo can handle it under full load. Generally if overclocking, not only the CPU, but also mainboard components get warmer, good case cooling is therefore also a must.

Before doing any overclocking do reasearch on the topic, learn from others experiences in overclocking forums. Search and read user accounts of overclocking the same CPU with the same stepping, some steppings overclock better than others. Some articles on XP2500+ overclocking can be found here:

http://www.pureoc.com/AMDXP2500_1.asp

http://www.viperlair.com/reviews/cpu_mobo/amd/2500xp/xp2500.shtml

http://www.hardocp.com/article.html?art=NDUz

http://www.ocaddiction.com/reviews/cpu/barton_2500/

http://www.vr-zone.com/guides/AMD/Barton/


After you´ve overclocked it´s highly recommended to stress test the CPU over a period of several hours, giving it a heavy workload. Popular tools for this task are Prime95, CPU Burn-in, Seti@home, and any benchmark able to run in a continuous loop. Monitor the temps while benchmarking.

Keep in mind that your system will only overclock as good as the weakest part in it, low quality RAM or low quality mainboard components can cause premature system instability although your CPU might be capable of even higher clocks.

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