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Grandmaster_Z
01-07-2009, 10:29 AM
"Given the pillars of devoted adherence to the path of the faith, it is unlikely that the usually accepted "Assassin" postulate is accurate. Hassan had his son executed for drinking wine and another person was banished from Alamut for playing the flute. The theories of Hassan being associated with Hashish are, at best, debatable. Furthermore there have emerged traces that there was a name given to Alamut by the people with Nizar? leanings: al-Assas "the foundation". It was the base for all operations that Hassan wished to effect. Members of al-Assas were known as al-Assas?n."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hassan-i_Sabbah

"The name "assassin" is commonly believed to be a mutation of the Persian hašš?š?n (???????); however, there are those who dispute this etymology, arguing that it originates from Marco Polo's account of his visit to Alamut in 1273[3] It is suggested by some writers that assassin simply means 'followers of Hassan' (or Hassan-i Sabbah, the Sheikh of Alamut (see below)). The term Hashshashin, a name given to them by their Arab enemies, was derived from the Arabic "hašš?š?n" (???????, "hashish user"). It also means the ones who produce hashish, which they are alleged to have ingested prior to their attacks, but this etymology is disputed. The sect referred to themselves as al-da'wa al-jad?da (Arabic:?????? ???????), which means the new doctrine, and were known within the organization as. The word Hashish (of probable Persian origin) refers to resin collected from cannabis flowers. The true meaning of the word in Persian is actually "healers" or "herb sellers".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashshashin

"Owing to the difficult situation in which the Ismailis were placed, their system of self-defence took a peculiar form. When their fortresses were attacked or besieged, they were isolated like small islands in a stormy sea. They prepared their garrisons for the fight, but were unable to mount a sizable army so trained military commandos Fir'dai as a rear-guard action. Fir'dai were covertly dispatched into the very heart of the Abbasid Court, and enemy military strongholds as sleeper agents. In order to remove key figures planning or responsible for attacks against Isma'ili populations, Fir'dai would become active taking reprisal action for an attack or the planning of one, by simply placing either a dagger or a note on the bed or within the chambers of their opponent as a warning, or even assassinating a key opponent when they deemed it necessary. Isma'ili were referred to as Hashahshin by their enemies, which as may of their political enemies believed them to consume the intoxicant Hashish before being dispatched as agents although modern scholarship ends to dispute this theory as polemic fabricated to discredit the Isma'ili, other theories suggest the term originates from them being followers of "Hassan", the term Hashashin entered western vocabulary via the returning crusaders as "assassin", which may be in reference to the Arabic "asas" meaning "followers of the Imam".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nizari

http://www.alamut.com/subj/ide...lamut/etymolAss.html (http://www.alamut.com/subj/ideologies/alamut/etymolAss.html)

Grandmaster_Z
01-07-2009, 10:29 AM
"Given the pillars of devoted adherence to the path of the faith, it is unlikely that the usually accepted "Assassin" postulate is accurate. Hassan had his son executed for drinking wine and another person was banished from Alamut for playing the flute. The theories of Hassan being associated with Hashish are, at best, debatable. Furthermore there have emerged traces that there was a name given to Alamut by the people with Nizar? leanings: al-Assas "the foundation". It was the base for all operations that Hassan wished to effect. Members of al-Assas were known as al-Assas?n."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hassan-i_Sabbah

"The name "assassin" is commonly believed to be a mutation of the Persian hašš?š?n (???????); however, there are those who dispute this etymology, arguing that it originates from Marco Polo's account of his visit to Alamut in 1273[3] It is suggested by some writers that assassin simply means 'followers of Hassan' (or Hassan-i Sabbah, the Sheikh of Alamut (see below)). The term Hashshashin, a name given to them by their Arab enemies, was derived from the Arabic "hašš?š?n" (???????, "hashish user"). It also means the ones who produce hashish, which they are alleged to have ingested prior to their attacks, but this etymology is disputed. The sect referred to themselves as al-da'wa al-jad?da (Arabic:?????? ???????), which means the new doctrine, and were known within the organization as. The word Hashish (of probable Persian origin) refers to resin collected from cannabis flowers. The true meaning of the word in Persian is actually "healers" or "herb sellers".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hashshashin

"Owing to the difficult situation in which the Ismailis were placed, their system of self-defence took a peculiar form. When their fortresses were attacked or besieged, they were isolated like small islands in a stormy sea. They prepared their garrisons for the fight, but were unable to mount a sizable army so trained military commandos Fir'dai as a rear-guard action. Fir'dai were covertly dispatched into the very heart of the Abbasid Court, and enemy military strongholds as sleeper agents. In order to remove key figures planning or responsible for attacks against Isma'ili populations, Fir'dai would become active taking reprisal action for an attack or the planning of one, by simply placing either a dagger or a note on the bed or within the chambers of their opponent as a warning, or even assassinating a key opponent when they deemed it necessary. Isma'ili were referred to as Hashahshin by their enemies, which as may of their political enemies believed them to consume the intoxicant Hashish before being dispatched as agents although modern scholarship ends to dispute this theory as polemic fabricated to discredit the Isma'ili, other theories suggest the term originates from them being followers of "Hassan", the term Hashashin entered western vocabulary via the returning crusaders as "assassin", which may be in reference to the Arabic "asas" meaning "followers of the Imam".
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nizari

http://www.alamut.com/subj/ide...lamut/etymolAss.html (http://www.alamut.com/subj/ideologies/alamut/etymolAss.html)

ScytheOfGrim
01-07-2009, 10:52 AM
I see two things: Marco Polo and Wikipedia.

This shall not end well.