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View Full Version : Jet powered RC F-14 Tomcat!!!



Cdn.401GATOR
03-24-2006, 02:13 PM
I was just blown away watching this!

http://gprime.net/video.php/miniaturejet

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/11.gif

Cdn.401GATOR
03-24-2006, 02:22 PM
B-52 video:

http://www.mcgirt.net/RC/VIDEOS/Giant_B52/B52_flight2.wmv

HayateAce
03-24-2006, 02:44 PM
What's with the HairBand music?

kearsarge007
03-24-2006, 02:46 PM
WOW That was awesome! you can fool somebody that the F-14 is not actually retired and it just flew over your house http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/88.gif http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif



What kind of engine did they use on the B-52?
&
F-14?<is it a real rocket or props?

LStarosta
03-24-2006, 04:03 PM
I can't believe the Superhornet is replacing these.

http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif



Tomcat.

Sexiest. Plane. Ever.

horseback
03-24-2006, 05:12 PM
Maintenance costs, bubba. No matter how cool looking or capable, the F-14 is an old design far more expensive to redesign, rewire, and put back into new production than the Superbug, which was already in the pipeline.

Besides, since Grumman has been sucked up by (the traditionally disdained by the Defense Department) Northrup, they never had a chance of keeping the Tomcat in the Fleet inventory.

cheers

horseback

Sergio_101
03-24-2006, 05:57 PM
Timely post. The F-14 is no longer in service.
Last flight was made last week.

All F-14s have been officially retired.

I doubt any will ever fly again after
they reach Davis Monthan AFB for "storage".

Although there is a civillian F4 Phantom
flying with the Collings Foundation I doubt
anyone would want to sign the check to
keep a F-14 airworthy.

Sergio

Bandit.426Cdn
03-24-2006, 07:27 PM
Originally posted by Sergio_101:
Timely post. The F-14 is no longer in service.
Last flight was made last week.

All F-14s have been officially retired.

I doubt any will ever fly again after
they reach Davis Monthan AFB for "storage".


Although there is a civillian F4 Phantom
flying with the Collings Foundation I doubt
anyone would want to sign the check to
keep a F-14 airworthy.

Sergio

Perhaps in the US inventory. The Iranian Air Force still have at least a handful of serviceable F-14's that were sold to them prior to the Islamic overthrow of the Shaw. They were a somewhat stripped export version without much of the advanced electronics of the US military spec version, but still quite potent.

StellarRat
03-24-2006, 07:45 PM
With the Soviet threat gone the main purpose for these jets is gone. They were built to carry and fire the Phoenix long range missile at incoming Soviet bombers threatening US Task Forces.

They fired in anger one time for the US? Shot down those two Libyan SU-25s. Am I wrong? Doing this from memory.

Sergio_101
03-24-2006, 07:47 PM
What kind of engine did they use on the B-52?

XB-52 through the B-52G the P&W J-57 turbojet.

B-52H the P&W TF-33P3 Turbofan.

To date all B-52s are 8 engines.
That may soon change as considerations and
studies are being done to re-engine
all remaining B-52Hs and some B-52Gs in storage
to a 4 engine config with high bypass Turbofans.

The 8 engine layout is a throw back to when
there was no engine big enough to power a B-52
with 4 engines.
With the more powerful and more efficent TF-33's
the 8 engine layout was kept for battle
survivability.

The B-52 mission no longer needs 8 engines.
4 big high bypass engines would give a B-52H
a truly global range, perhaps the ability
to circle the globe on one load of fuel!

Sergio

LStarosta
03-24-2006, 07:48 PM
Originally posted by Bandit.426Cdn:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Sergio_101:
Timely post. The F-14 is no longer in service.
Last flight was made last week.

All F-14s have been officially retired.

I doubt any will ever fly again after
they reach Davis Monthan AFB for "storage".


Although there is a civillian F4 Phantom
flying with the Collings Foundation I doubt
anyone would want to sign the check to
keep a F-14 airworthy.

Sergio

Perhaps in the US inventory. The Iranian Air Force still have at least a handful of serviceable F-14's that were sold to them prior to the Islamic overthrow of the Shaw. They were a somewhat stripped export version without much of the advanced electronics of the US military spec version, but still quite potent. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

http://www.aerospaceweb.org/aircraft/fighter/f14/f14_16.jpg

Phoenix missles...

Hmm.. Potent indeed?

raisen
03-24-2006, 09:37 PM
They fired in anger one time for the US? Shot down those two Libyan SU-25s. Am I wrong? Doing this from memory.
Can't remember the where, or even when (80's I think), but I seem to recall reading that even this engagement never saw any Phoenix missiles used. The Libyan aircraft would have been SU-22's, again if I remember correctly. Looked kind of like a scaled up SU-7 (wildly popular with their crews, a sort of Heinemanns hotrod from the east), but with an extra engine and swing wings, used as strike planes mostly. No sort of plane to engage Tomcats, unable to disengage (too slow), unable to manouvre with an F14, no stand off capability, unable to defend themselves after the F14's ROE allowed them to engage. Big news story in.... what ? 1984 ? Earlier ?

Raisen

VW-IceFire
03-24-2006, 09:37 PM
Its largely reported that the F-14's used by Iran are barely serviceable. So I'm not sure how useful they would be....things may have changed.

Crazy_Goanna
03-24-2006, 10:00 PM
Cool biz boys,Looks like better exercise and fun than sitting on your *** playing computers but hugely more expensive to fix when the plane crashes as opposed to the old computer system crashes that ocur from time to time.

Stackhouse25th
03-24-2006, 11:01 PM
they have F-14A's, and most likely are only 3 of them flying of the 70 there. Rumor has it lots were removed of their essential flying parts by departing american scientists.

even if they get them in the air, they dont have enough stick time to compete against USA pilots and their stick time.

I hope someday those 70 tomcats will be upgraded and back in US hands and flying on carrier decks. 70 good planes is a lot of planes to just put to waste.

But then again if we invade Iran all of them will be destroyed by US air forces. Sigh.

OD_79
03-25-2006, 06:35 AM
Lasy I heard they were supposed to have about 30 of them left flying, they canablaise parts from the other aircraft to keep them going, they definately had Phoenix missiles, whether they are any good is questionable though, they weren't exactly the best missiles anyway, just had a huge range.

OD.

alert_1
03-25-2006, 06:49 AM
Although Iraninas might still have some F14 airworthy I doubt that 25 yre old AIM54A would be good for anything more than free fall bombing. Solid fuel have about 10yrs usable lifetime.Maybe 15, but sure not 25.

horseback
03-25-2006, 09:08 AM
I'm just gonna come out and say it.

I went through my US Navy Electronics Technician 'A' School with Iranian classmates, and even if their aviation counterparts were twice as competant as the surface Navy guys, no Iranian Phoenix missile is ever likely to launch again--at least on purpose.

The surest way to tell if your instructor hated you was if he assigned you an Iranian lab partner while working with high voltage power supplies...

cheers

horseback

heywooood
03-25-2006, 09:27 AM
can we please not talk about the F-14s' retirement...it's still too fresh. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

..and I can't help but wonder if anyone would be surprised at the occurrence of a catastophic accident in an Iranian nuclear plant...

raisen
03-25-2006, 10:43 AM
The surest way to tell if your instructor hated you was if he assigned you an Iranian lab partner while working with high voltage power supplies...

ok, let's have the earth cable... Yarrrrgggh !

I had an interesting experience with a bunch of kids, all of whom came from a similar British background (down to the same street if I remember) in a microbiology lab at college once. The three of them managed to give themselves e. coli whilst they were supposed to be doing a practical experiment. No surprise when they failed to attend for week.... Probably had to be carried from "the heads". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/53.gif

The tutor referred to the ringleader of the bunch as "Major Disaster".

Raisen

horseback
03-25-2006, 02:46 PM
Actually, it was more like "Yes, of course the power is off, what do you think I am, an idiot?"--BZZZTT!!!--"Oh! I am so very sorry!"

Half an hour later, after his victim was safely off to the dispensary, the perpetrator would be claiming that it was all the victim's fault...

To be fair, though, I've met and worked with several Persians in civilian life since then, and the overwhelming majority were no better or worse than anybody else.

cheers

horseback

darkhorizon11
03-26-2006, 12:49 AM
Originally posted by horseback:
Maintenance costs, bubba. No matter how cool looking or capable, the F-14 is an old design far more expensive to redesign, rewire, and put back into new production than the Superbug, which was already in the pipeline.

Besides, since Grumman has been sucked up by (the traditionally disdained by the Defense Department) Northrup, they never had a chance of keeping the Tomcat in the Fleet inventory.

cheers

horseback

Yeah old technology, the swing wing hydraulics are old bulky and heavy by todays standards. Remember the initial design of that plane dates back to the early 60s.

El Turo
03-26-2006, 01:21 AM
Also, without advanced avionics and radar, the long range of the Phoenix is more or less useless.. propellant or not.

alert_1
03-26-2006, 09:54 AM
Also, without advanced avionics and radar, the long range of the Phoenix is more or less useless.. propellant or not.

Hmm...AN/APG71 i still probably the most powerful a2a rdr in the world. It can detect a target at 370km (reportedly it's not the limit, with bigger antennae is capable up to 400 nm!), it's able to track 24 different targets in complex condition (notching APG71 is not easy) and guide 6 AIM54 C ECCM missiles on targets at different altitudes...
Let't say you nedd to take out an enemz AWACS circling deep in hostile territory, jealously guarded with a pack of Su30. What is more suitable fo rthe task then F14+Aim54C combo?

Messaschnitzel
03-26-2006, 09:50 PM
A few years ago, I was thinking about relocating to another area. I began scouting around the local manufacturing scene to see what kind of jobs were to be had. One place I called manufactured scale model jet engines. From what I was told, it is a small operation with only three guys working there. The owner told me that at that time the business was steady, but with a business that small, I have my doubts about job longevity. In my experience, all it takes is a shop snafu or a customer problem and it is the last man hired gets let go. After seeing the video, It would have been fun to build and test the engines just to see how much stress they can take before they start sounding like a really loud coffee grinder! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/icon_twisted.gif

GR142-Pipper
03-26-2006, 11:16 PM
Originally posted by raisen:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">They fired in anger one time for the US? Shot down those two Libyan SU-25s. Am I wrong? Doing this from memory.
Can't remember the where, or even when (80's I think), but I seem to recall reading that even this engagement never saw any Phoenix missiles used. The Libyan aircraft would have been SU-22's, again if I remember correctly. Looked kind of like a scaled up SU-7 (wildly popular with their crews, a sort of Heinemanns hotrod from the east), but with an extra engine and swing wings, used as strike planes mostly. No sort of plane to engage Tomcats, unable to disengage (too slow), unable to manouvre with an F14, no stand off capability, unable to defend themselves after the F14's ROE allowed them to engage. Big news story in.... what ? 1984 ? Earlier ?

Raisen </div></BLOCKQUOTE>You're right. It was 1981 and the aircraft were indeed Su-22's. However, these are single-engined aircraft (you may be thinking of the Su-24 Fencer which is twin-engined). One of the guys involved in the Libyan aircraft shoot down was an outstanding aviator and pilot by the name of Hank Kleeman. He was C.O. of VF-41 at the time. I knew him when we were at Miramar. Unfortunately, Hank was killed in a freak F-18 landing accident at Miramar in 1985.

GR142-Pipper

GR142-Pipper
03-26-2006, 11:30 PM
Originally posted by horseback:
I'm just gonna come out and say it.

I went through my US Navy Electronics Technician 'A' School with Iranian classmates, and even if their aviation counterparts were twice as competant as the surface Navy guys, no Iranian Phoenix missile is ever likely to launch again--at least on purpose.

The surest way to tell if your instructor hated you was if he assigned you an Iranian lab partner while working with high voltage power supplies...

cheers

horseback When I was at Miramar, I went through the F-14 pipeline at the same time as the Iraninans did with many being experienced F-4 Phantom pilots/RSO's. It was really an interesting experience. The first group that came over were pretty good. However, the second and subsequent groups were less so...a lot less so. I remember one occasion where my friends and I were cracking some jokes about how absolutely abysmal some of their skills were when one of the Iranian captains happened to overhear us and came over to our table. He told us that he understood why we were laughing but explained how things in Iran were very much different from the U.S. in how individuals got selected for pilot/NFO training. In Iran (time of the Shah), pilots got selected often times on what their family's relationship with the Shah was (the closer to the throne, the more privilege). In the U.S. pilots are chosen based on ability regardless of what their family's background is. He just asked us to keep that in mind. This particular officer was a very competent pilot and officer and we realized the guy had a point. We still laughed at their zany airmanship (some of these guys were just hopeless grapes as fighter pilots) but we did respect the guy for having the stones to approach us in an honest and composed manner.

His words were very true.

GR142-Pipper

jimDG
03-27-2006, 06:27 AM
awesome. all this plane needs is a little gimballed camera in the pit, a radio TV link, and a VR head set. and then you'd be flying for real http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif (at 4x time compared to a real f-14, given the lower inertia)

whiteladder
03-27-2006, 07:03 AM
As far as I know the only Western kills with the f-14 were all against Libyan aircraft in the 1980`s.

VF-41 Black Aces shot down 2 Su22 in 1981 and VF-32 Swordsmen shot down 2 Mig 23 in 1989.

All but 1 were with Sidewinders, the exception being a Mig23 to a Sparrow.

As for the Iranains f-14 its combat use has been sketchy at best. The Irainian Airforce has made claims of upto 25 Iraqi aircraft shot down, mostly it claims with Aim54`s. What is certian is that supplies (250 were in Iranian stocks) ran out in 1986, so they were being fired at least. The Iraqi have claimed 11 f-14 shot down between 1982 and 1984.

Other reports place the the true figure at 4 kils to 4-5 losses.

JarheadEd
03-27-2006, 07:18 AM
Originally posted by alert_1:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Also, without advanced avionics and radar, the long range of the Phoenix is more or less useless.. propellant or not.

Hmm...AN/APG71 i still probably the most powerful a2a rdr in the world. It can detect a target at 370km (reportedly it's not the limit, with bigger antennae is capable up to 400 nm!), it's able to track 24 different targets in complex condition (notching APG71 is not easy) and guide 6 AIM54 C ECCM missiles on targets at different altitudes...
Let't say you nedd to take out an enemz AWACS circling deep in hostile territory, jealously guarded with a pack of Su30. What is more suitable fo rthe task then F14+Aim54C combo? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Well I think he was refering to Iranian Tomcats, which would have the venerable AWWG-9, which is definately not a contender now-a-days. IIRC Aviation Week and Space Technology (We call it "Aviation Leak" here at Boeing) reported that all Iranian AIM-54's were out of service.

BUT!

Those rascally Iranians had converted Their HAWK missiles to an Air to Air missile for their surviving Tomcats. (They had a much larger inventory base to work with) So they have a AIM-54/AIM-7 hybrid, sort of. Lets just say with the ginormous warhead on a HAWK,..something is gettin blown up realllll good.

As for AIM-54 being fired in anger, There was one shot made at a Iraqi MIG-25R. From the stern. At Longgg range. The MIG-25 lit the burners and out ran it. I think this was during operation Desert Fox. (AW&ST again)

Temporal_Mass
03-27-2006, 12:44 PM
Originally posted by raisen:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">They fired in anger one time for the US? Shot down those two Libyan SU-25s. Am I wrong? Doing this from memory.
Can't remember the where, or even when (80's I think), but I seem to recall reading that even this engagement never saw any Phoenix missiles used. The Libyan aircraft would have been SU-22's, again if I remember correctly. Looked kind of like a scaled up SU-7 (wildly popular with their crews, a sort of Heinemanns hotrod from the east), but with an extra engine and swing wings, used as strike planes mostly. No sort of plane to engage Tomcats, unable to disengage (too slow), unable to manouvre with an F14, no stand off capability, unable to defend themselves after the F14's ROE allowed them to engage. Big news story in.... what ? 1984 ? Earlier ?

Raisen </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Jan 4th, 1989. Two F-14 Tomcats engaged two Mig-23s. A cockpit audio of the engagement is available here: http://www.alexisparkinn.com/photogallery/Videos/2006-migshootdown.wav

It is very interesting to note the pilots voice as he starts the engagement and how you can hear him getting more excited as the engagement develops.

XyZspineZyX
03-27-2006, 05:47 PM
Originally posted by HayateAce:
What's with the HairBand music?

You've obviously never seen Top Gun. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/51.gif