PDA

View Full Version : Brotherhood codex



Isamu125
08-13-2011, 07:18 PM
on page 13 of the codex (the picture of a guy with two hidden blades) there are metal formulae.
if you look at the three metal plates one on top of the other the metal on the top and the metal on the bottom are the same. the metal in the middle is coal.what are the top and bottom ones?

Poodle_of_Doom
08-13-2011, 09:07 PM
Originally posted by Isamu125:
on page 13 of the codex (the picture of a guy with two hidden blades) there are metal formulae.
if you look at the three metal plates one on top of the other the metal on the top and the metal on the bottom are the same. the metal in the middle is coal.what are the top and bottom ones?

What makes you think the middle one is coal? You read Arabic or something?

Subject_4
08-13-2011, 09:51 PM
Any chance you have a picture to share? I have not seen it.

Subject 4

Poodle_of_Doom
08-14-2011, 01:12 AM
Originally posted by Subject_4:
Any chance you have a picture to share? I have not seen it.

Subject 4 http://images2.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20100529015029/assassinscreed/images/e/e6/Zw-codex-13.png

Subject_4
08-14-2011, 01:52 AM
Steel.
you would need carbon (coal) and iron to make steel.
It has been long known that some of the best steel is harder on the outside, softer on the inside to give enough overall flexibility, and enough hardness on sides to hold an edge. I am not sure if that is what this image is implying or not, but it is definitely coal and steel.

Subject 4

itsamea-mario
08-14-2011, 02:03 AM
Yeah coal isn't a metal.

LightRey
08-14-2011, 05:51 AM
Originally posted by itsamea-mario:
Yeah coal isn't a metal.
Well, when talking about alloys you can call coal a metal, but yeah technically it isn't.

Serrachio
08-14-2011, 06:10 AM
Originally posted by LightRey:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by itsamea-mario:
Yeah coal isn't a metal.
Well, when talking about alloys you can call coal a metal, but yeah technically it isn't. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, carbon in alloys is an additive to the forging process.

LightRey
08-14-2011, 06:35 AM
Originally posted by Serrachio:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LightRey:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by itsamea-mario:
Yeah coal isn't a metal.
Well, when talking about alloys you can call coal a metal, but yeah technically it isn't. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, carbon in alloys is an additive to the forging process. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
What exactly do you mean? I'm quite sure carbon fulfills the same function as any metal does in an alloy. Especially considering that regular carbon steel consists of only iron and carbon.

Poodle_of_Doom
08-14-2011, 09:02 AM
Originally posted by LightRey:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by Serrachio:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by LightRey:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by itsamea-mario:
Yeah coal isn't a metal.
Well, when talking about alloys you can call coal a metal, but yeah technically it isn't. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, carbon in alloys is an additive to the forging process. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>
What exactly do you mean? I'm quite sure carbon fulfills the same function as any metal does in an alloy. Especially considering that regular carbon steel consists of only iron and carbon. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Actually, I didn't think about it last night, but I might have something. To make steel, if I'm not mistaken, it's two parts iron to one part coal isn't it?

I don't know how many of you live in the US, or if those of you who don't have this, but I had been watching a special on Samurai, and sword making on PBS. In it, they were talking with a guy, who just so happened to be a Master Sword maker, and one of about five left in the world. He makes all his swords by hand, and no machines are used.

I remember watching this guy pour his steel into a large clay kiln, and melt it down. Only a certain quality steel could be used, not to brittle, not to strong, and with low carbon content. He'd put coal on the fire to keep the steel melted, and only he was allowed to add to the fire. There was a certain temperature that needed to be maintained. Any higher, and the sword would be brittle, and lower, and the sword would snap.

By the time all was done, he'd walk to the top of the kiln, with a pot of carbon, and add it in slowly, I assume looking for changes as he went. Then he poured the steel, and shaped it, and hammered it, sharpened it, and ultimately worked it over to the standards he and his company have. At the end, he revealed he had steel left over, and that he had a process by which to test it, and its carbon content. If it didn't meet his criteria, the sword was declared faulty, and destroyed.

The man went on to tell about how the carbon content is everything in the blade. If you have to much carbon, it becomes brittle. When swords connect, chucks will snap off. If you have to little, the swords will be weak, and snap when contact is made. If it's just right, however, most swords would outlive their counterparts for centuries, he said.

Anyway, from the story I described, I can draw similarity from the picture.

Subject_4
08-15-2011, 10:04 AM
Yes, I touched on that in my post, although the Japanese were not the first to use carbon steel, nor to use different amounts of carbon for differing hardness. It is typically .3% to 2% carbon. And yes, higher carbon makes it harder, which can hold an edge better, but it makes it much more brittle.

Anyways, after further research I think that image is describing the crucible steel method. There is more information on wikipedia.

Subject 4

Poodle_of_Doom
08-15-2011, 12:59 PM
Originally posted by Subject_4:
Anyways, after further research I think that image is describing the crucible steel method. There is more information on wikipedia.

The Cruicible Steel method describes a lot of different ways of making steel. I think that's a generic way of referencing a type of manufacturing, not necessarily a type of steel. I think the picture is describing how to make steel specifically, and a kind with great strength.

Subject_4
08-15-2011, 03:24 PM
Indeed, it really depended on the location, there were different methods and techniques and they were rarely shared, and probably less often understood, in their time.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Damascus_steel

Subject 4