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cawimmer430
01-27-2007, 01:46 PM
So today I receive a call from my dad to pick him up at a pub since he's had too much to drink that he can't legally drive. Once there, I sat with his buddies for awhile and got into a conversation with one of them. Turns out this guy was in the Afrika Korps in the Pioniere.

The conversation only lasted 5 minutes or so, so I didn't have enough time to ask him some specific details like the unit etc. He also spoke ver softly and quietly and the pub was loud as hell so I didn't understand some of the things he mumbled. The fact that he had a thick Bavarian accent didn't help either.

His name is Sepp, didn't catch his last name that well. Something ...meier.

His war began in France at age 19 where he saw some action but in the Wehrmacht. After that, he became really sick and was placed in the reserves until he was called up for duty again in mid 1942. During his recuperation, he'd been training with the Pioniere. He was sent to Afrika. He didn't say much about his combat experiences, but it was on May 7, 1943 that he was captured together with remnants of his unit by a French Foreign Legion, which was led by a Russian and also included a couple of Germans who were fighting their fellow Germans, or so he said! I asked him how they were captured but he never answered that question. Either way, he and his fellow Pioniere spent a few weeks as their prisoners before being handed over to the Americans. From there, he was shipped to a prisoner of war camp in Louisiana. He doesn't remember the name of the camp that well. Something Camp Ball... something. Wikipedia list the following as US POW camps in America:

Camp Livingston
Camp Claiborne
Camp Polk
Camp Ruston

Link: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_POW_camps_in_the_United_States

I am guessing he meant CAMP POLK??? Sorry but this guy spoke very soft like a really old man and with a thick Bavarian accent. I asked him three times what the name of the camp was and it sounded like he was saying "Camp BALL".

Anyway, he said that the American guards were mostly really young soldiers who were actually afraid of the Germans. He later found out it was because they were being told that about the propaganda from Nazi Germany of how the Germans are a "super human race" and all that stuff. He said that in Louisiana, they spent their time building homes for people, cutting down trees, helping out with the farms and a few other activities. The guarding system was one American guard for ever 5 Germans.

He was released in 1946 from American captivity only to be put into French captivity from which he was released in 1947. Being a former Pioniere, he was forced to clear mines in the Normandy and northern France region. He says he lost many of his friends doing these jobs. He also said that he was given to a French family as a labourer and helped them with their farmwork etc. One of the family members was a boy about his age back in 1946/1947 and he recently paid him a visit with his wife. He said they shared stories over a glass of French red wine as if they had been best friends.

Here's a picture of us, taken just a few hours ago. He's 84 years old now (born in 1922). Interestingly enough, he says that most of the guys in his Pioniere unit were also fellows born in 1922 making them 21 years of age when they became POW's. He was happy that a young kid like me is interested in this stuff. He admitted that he probably doesn't have long to live and that his daughters are writing down his memories and publishing a book about it.

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/7717/seppundcwwi7.jpg

There's also a guy in my town who was in the Waffen SS and fought in Stalingrad or so he says. His family runs a flower shop and so during the summers, he'll often be seen sitting outside shirtless doing stuff with flowers. Boy, his body is full of scars. Terrible stuff I tell you. On his left arm, near his elbow is a particularly brutal scar. He says this was given to him by a Russian machine gun that got him right there. Amazing that his arm wasn't ripped off. He also fought in Yugoslavia and he's got stories to tell of how they once captured partisans that had ambushed them and executed them on the spot. I need to talk with this guy before his time comes.v http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

A few weeks ago, I met another veteran who was in the Wehrmacht. This guy was missing his entire left arm and on his right hand, he only had his thumb and finger and a big portion of his right hand beneath those two remaining fingers was missing. My dad knows this guy well and he was only 21 when he was this badly wounded. I don't think I could live with such a dissability. But this guy managed to go through life like that, respect. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif


So yeah, there you have it. I'll probably meet this guy again and I hope to learn more about his amazing story. Also looking forward to interviewing the former Waffen SS guy who fought in Russia and Stalingrad, Yugoslavia, Italy and probably other countries.

Friendly_flyer
01-27-2007, 02:38 PM
Interesting story, thanks for sharing!

PBNA-Boosher
01-27-2007, 03:00 PM
Salute for a few brave men!

BillyTheKid_22
01-27-2007, 03:34 PM
Wow!!! http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/clap.gif

SithSpeeder
01-27-2007, 03:42 PM
Great stuff...thanks for sharing.

* _54th_Speeder *

fireman196988
01-27-2007, 05:51 PM
There had to be more than 4 POW camps in America during WW2. I've heard there were over 650 camps in America and 20 some in Canada. I not sure if it was a named Camp but my grandfather ran a brickyard in Hastings, Nebraska than utilized POW labor. When I go home to visit my parents I'll ask my dad for more information since he lived at/near the brickyard and was between 8~12 years old during the war. My uncle Dallas was a tail-gunner in a B-24 and is still listed as MIA over the ETO. My uncle Harry is a little older than my dad and remembers more about that time in history and I'll ask him some more questions the next time I talk to him.

Came across the following info.

"For a history of the POW camps in the United States during WW2, please refer to Dr. Arnold Krammer's fantastic book, NAZI PRISONERS OF WAR IN AMERICA, Davis Fiedler's book, THE ENEMY AMONG US and CAMP GRANT by Gregory S. Jacobs, Historian and author."

Fireman

R_Target
01-27-2007, 05:56 PM
I've read Krammer's book, but unfortunately don't have it any more. Pretty amazing stuff. 450,000 Axis P.O.W.'s in U.S.A. & Canada.

Monty_Thrud
01-27-2007, 07:52 PM
Salute to that man...excellent story Cawimmer430, keep it up, more!

cawimmer430
01-27-2007, 07:54 PM
No problem. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cawimmer430
01-27-2007, 07:56 PM
Originally posted by fireman196988:
There had to be more than 4 POW camps in America during WW2. I've heard there were over 650 camps in America and 20 some in Canada. I not sure if it was a named Camp but my grandfather ran a brickyard in Hastings, Nebraska than utilized POW labor. When I go home to visit my parents I'll ask my dad for more information since he lived at/near the brickyard and was between 8~12 years old during the war. My uncle Dallas was a tail-gunner in a B-24 and is still listed as MIA over the ETO. My uncle Harry is a little older than my dad and remembers more about that time in history and I'll ask him some more questions the next time I talk to him.

Came across the following info.

"For a history of the POW camps in the United States during WW2, please refer to Dr. Arnold Krammer's fantastic book, NAZI PRISONERS OF WAR IN AMERICA, Davis Fiedler's book, THE ENEMY AMONG US and CAMP GRANT by Gregory S. Jacobs, Historian and author."

Fireman

Whoops, I should have checked my little write up because I meant to say that I found these 4 POW camps in LOUISIANA. He must have been in one of them and it looks like he may have been in CAMP POLK since he said he was in "Camp Ball". http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Will graciously await your information. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cawimmer430
01-27-2007, 07:58 PM
Originally posted by Monty_Thrud:
Salute to that man...excellent story Cawimmer430, keep it up, more!

Anytime. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Here are some threads I created sometime ago on these forums about my family's World War II history. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Thread 1: http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/8751026194/p/1

Thread 2: http://forums.ubi.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/23110283/m/8351004394/p/1


EDIT: Both these threads seem to have been deleted or lost when this forum crashed. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_frown.gif

DxyFlyr
01-27-2007, 08:30 PM
He was at Camp Livingston. It was near Ball, Louisiana which is in the near middle of the state. The area is national forest now. The streets and slabs that the barracks were on are still there, but trees have taken them over. Same deal with Camp Claiborne which wasn't too far away. I used to do some camping at both camps when I was little.

I wasn't aware of a POW camp at Polk, but the one at Ruston was huge. The U-boat crew captured by the British were there. They were held in secret throughout the war... even from other prisoners.

My dad was in high school during the war. He lived in Alexandria (near Ball). Dad played french horn in the high school band and made several trips to the nearby POW camps on holidays (mainly Christmas) to play for the prisoners.

He jokes that it would be considered a form of torture today. They played pretty poorly, apparently. I'm sure your friend was in his audience at one point or another. Ask him if he remembers the locals coming out to play Christmas Carols for them.


------EDIT: If you have google earth, type in Ball, Louisiana. Look at the forested area just to the north east of Ball and you will see a couple roads called Camp Livingston. If I remember right, the camp was between these roads.

-------EDIT 2 Here it is... 31?25'33.55"N 92?22'19.90"W the darker trees right around this spot is the POW camp. You can make out the rest of the camp by the somewhat still visible roads to the north and east of that spot.

cawimmer430
01-28-2007, 07:54 AM
Originally posted by DxyFlyr:
He was at Camp Livingston. It was near Ball, Louisiana which is in the near middle of the state. The area is national forest now. The streets and slabs that the barracks were on are still there, but trees have taken them over. Same deal with Camp Claiborne which wasn't too far away. I used to do some camping at both camps when I was little.

I wasn't aware of a POW camp at Polk, but the one at Ruston was huge. The U-boat crew captured by the British were there. They were held in secret throughout the war... even from other prisoners.

My dad was in high school during the war. He lived in Alexandria (near Ball). Dad played french horn in the high school band and made several trips to the nearby POW camps on holidays (mainly Christmas) to play for the prisoners.

He jokes that it would be considered a form of torture today. They played pretty poorly, apparently. I'm sure your friend was in his audience at one point or another. Ask him if he remembers the locals coming out to play Christmas Carols for them.


------EDIT: If you have google earth, type in Ball, Louisiana. Look at the forested area just to the north east of Ball and you will see a couple roads called Camp Livingston. If I remember right, the camp was between these roads.

-------EDIT 2 Here it is... 31?25'33.55"N 92?22'19.90"W the darker trees right around this spot is the POW camp. You can make out the rest of the camp by the somewhat still visible roads to the north and east of that spot.

Thanks for the response. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

I will tell him what you told me and perhaps this will jog his memory. I'll have a look at the sites below later, bookmarked them for now. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?

I found this below and it's quite humurous and hard-to-believe at the same time. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif

Link: http://www.mnlegion.org/paper/html/minnesota_pows.html

berg417448
01-28-2007, 08:38 AM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:



BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?


L

Yes...such things did sometimes happen. I recall reading about two German POWs who were working on a farm out west. The farmer became fond of them and actually allowed them to take his car to town one day! They acquired some alcohol and were pulled over by the Highway Patrol for drunk driving!


In Camp Clinton the ranking German POW officer had his own car driver assigned. It was said that he went to movies in town because it was the only air conditioned movie theater in the area!
http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature20/germanprisonersofwar.html

In some areas of the country the POWs actually had more food available to them than the civilian population due to rationing regulations. Seems strange but I've seen interviews of former POWs who confirmed it.

I'm sure that the treatment varied from camp to camp

Xiolablu3
01-28-2007, 09:31 AM
Good stuff mate!

The first guy sounds either totally freaked out by his experiences or like a total pacifist who hated the fights. This is just my first thoughts after what you wrote, anyway.

Thanks for posting http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Pirschjaeger
01-28-2007, 10:21 AM
Hey, thanks Christian. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

DxyFlyr
01-28-2007, 10:39 AM
Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:



BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?


L

Yes...such things did sometimes happen. I recall reading about two German POWs who were working on a farm out west. The farmer became fond of them and actually allowed them to take his car to town one day! They acquired some alcohol and were pulled over by the Highway Patrol for drunk driving!


In Camp Clinton the ranking German POW officer had his own car driver assigned. It was said that he went to movies in town because it was the only air conditioned movie theater in the area!
http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature20/germanprisonersofwar.html

In some areas of the country the POWs actually had more food available to them than the civilian population due to rationing regulations. Seems strange but I've seen interviews of former POWs who confirmed it.

I'm sure that the treatment varied from camp to camp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



There's another great story out of Camp Clinton. This camp held the majority of German captured high ranking officers. (Generals). The one you are referring to is Von Arnim, Rommel's replacement. There is a story of one General, I don't remember if it was Von Arnim or not, who left the camp in broad daylight in full uniform and walked into the city of Jackson. He intended to check in to a nice hotel and write a scathing letter of complaint about the deplorable conditions in his camp to the officials in Washington. He had two choices of fine hotels... The King Edward or the The Heidelberg. Guess which one he chose?

He did check in and write that letter on the hotel stationery. His complaints were laughable... being forced to share a cottage with another ranking officer. Then, having to share an aide with the same officer.

He then walked back to camp and checked himself in. The theory is that there were so many uniforms around Jackson at the time, that nobody recognised it as "enemy".

BillyTheKid_22
01-28-2007, 11:11 AM
http://okielegacy.org/image/powpittsburgcamp.jpg


German prisoner of war from Oklahoma.

www.okielegacy.org/WWIIpowcamps/powcamp2.html (http://www.okielegacy.org)

Blutarski2004
01-28-2007, 02:37 PM
Originally posted by DxyFlyr:
There's another great story out of Camp Clinton. This camp held the majority of German captured high ranking officers. (Generals). The one you are referring to is Von Arnim, Rommel's replacement. There is a story of one General, I don't remember if it was Von Arnim or not, who left the camp in broad daylight in full uniform and walked into the city of Jackson. He intended to check in to a nice hotel and write a scathing letter of complaint about the deplorable conditions in his camp to the officials in Washington. He had two choices of fine hotels... The King Edward or the The Heidelberg. Guess which one he chose?

He did check in and write that letter on the hotel stationery. His complaints were laughable... being forced to share a cottage with another ranking officer. Then, having to share an aide with the same officer.

He then walked back to camp and checked himself in. The theory is that there were so many uniforms around Jackson at the time, that nobody recognised it as "enemy".


..... This reinforces my belief that truth is indeed stranger than fiction. They couldn't possibly make this kind of stuff up.

BTW, has anyone noticed the photo Cawimmer included with his original post? Judging from the beer left in the respective glasses, it sure looks like the old landser can still outdrink the young guy ..... ;-]

Beaufort-RAF
01-28-2007, 07:23 PM
Nice dog. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 08:59 AM
Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:



BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?


L

Yes...such things did sometimes happen. I recall reading about two German POWs who were working on a farm out west. The farmer became fond of them and actually allowed them to take his car to town one day! They acquired some alcohol and were pulled over by the Highway Patrol for drunk driving!


In Camp Clinton the ranking German POW officer had his own car driver assigned. It was said that he went to movies in town because it was the only air conditioned movie theater in the area!
http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature20/germanprisonersofwar.html

In some areas of the country the POWs actually had more food available to them than the civilian population due to rationing regulations. Seems strange but I've seen interviews of former POWs who confirmed it.

I'm sure that the treatment varied from camp to camp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Thanks. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

That story is quite funny! Imagine being a POW camp guard in America and two German POW's come back to camp in a car they borrowed from a farmer. I'd pay to see their facial expressions. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

Interesting link. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by Xiolablu3:
Good stuff mate!

The first guy sounds either totally freaked out by his experiences or like a total pacifist who hated the fights. This is just my first thoughts after what you wrote, anyway.

Thanks for posting http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

No problem. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

Sepp doesn't sound very enthusiastic about the war, you're right. He seems like a quiet person and I really did want to ask him about his combat experiences etc. It's not often you meet a former member of the German Sturmpioniere (engineers). Next time I meet him, I'll make sure to ask him some more questions. He was pretty delighted that a young "newer generation" kid like me was interested in this stuff.

One question I plan to ask him was how he and his unit reacted to the news of the death of Hans Joachim Marseille. Someone posted a YouTube video history about HJM and it in they said that the Axis ground troops, German and Italian, loved him because they felt he took a burden off their shoulders (Allied air attacks etc.).

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:03 AM
Originally posted by Pirschjaeger:
Hey, thanks Christian. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

Kein Problem. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:11 AM
Originally posted by DxyFlyr:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:



BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?


L

Yes...such things did sometimes happen. I recall reading about two German POWs who were working on a farm out west. The farmer became fond of them and actually allowed them to take his car to town one day! They acquired some alcohol and were pulled over by the Highway Patrol for drunk driving!


In Camp Clinton the ranking German POW officer had his own car driver assigned. It was said that he went to movies in town because it was the only air conditioned movie theater in the area!
http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature20/germanprisonersofwar.html

In some areas of the country the POWs actually had more food available to them than the civilian population due to rationing regulations. Seems strange but I've seen interviews of former POWs who confirmed it.

I'm sure that the treatment varied from camp to camp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



There's another great story out of Camp Clinton. This camp held the majority of German captured high ranking officers. (Generals). The one you are referring to is Von Arnim, Rommel's replacement. There is a story of one General, I don't remember if it was Von Arnim or not, who left the camp in broad daylight in full uniform and walked into the city of Jackson. He intended to check in to a nice hotel and write a scathing letter of complaint about the deplorable conditions in his camp to the officials in Washington. He had two choices of fine hotels... The King Edward or the The Heidelberg. Guess which one he chose?

He did check in and write that letter on the hotel stationery. His complaints were laughable... being forced to share a cottage with another ranking officer. Then, having to share an aide with the same officer.

He then walked back to camp and checked himself in. The theory is that there were so many uniforms around Jackson at the time, that nobody recognised it as "enemy". </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like a German general to me, especially PRUSSIAN! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:12 AM
Originally posted by BillyTheKid_22:
http://okielegacy.org/image/powpittsburgcamp.jpg


German prisoner of war from Oklahoma.

www.okielegacy.org/WWIIpowcamps/powcamp2.html (http://www.okielegacy.org)

Thanks. Bookmarked the site. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:15 AM
Originally posted by Blutarski2004:

BTW, has anyone noticed the photo Cawimmer included with his original post? Judging from the beer left in the respective glasses, it sure looks like the old landser can still outdrink the young guy ..... ;-]

LOL http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif

I was drinking a Spezi and he was drinking a beer. Spezi is a mixture of 70% Coca Cola and 30% Fanta Orange, it's pretty popular amongst youngsters in Europe. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

cawimmer430
01-29-2007, 09:16 AM
Originally posted by Beaufort-RAF:
Nice dog. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-wink.gif


Thanks!

JACK RUSSELL TERRIER named "Frankie". http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_biggrin.gif http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif

PB0_shadow
01-29-2007, 09:52 AM
He didn't say much about his combat experiences, but it was on May 7, 1943 that he was captured together with remnants of his unit by a French Foreign Legion, which was led by a Russian and also included a couple of Germans who were fighting their fellow Germans, or so he said!

There were indeed Germans in the Foreign Legion fighting in africa against the Afrikakorps, among whom Hans Hartung (painter)

Nice story :-)

joeap
01-29-2007, 10:29 AM
Awesome story, I'd love to meet this fellow. A friend of mine from Germany told me about her grandfather who was in the Luftwaffe and flew as aircrew on Ju-52s delivering supplies to North Africa, and also hunting mines in the Baltic. (They flew low and had equipment to detonate magnetic mines) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif She didn't know that much as he only spoke of the war when he was in a "mood."

Really cool thing about this forum, and for me reading about German and Russian vet experiences (like FSPKLOR has posted) that I had little exposure to before.

Widowmaker214
01-29-2007, 11:46 AM
Next time you see him, shake his hand for all of us will you. Regardless of the side, these guys need to know that they havn't been forgotten.

DxyFlyr
01-29-2007, 11:54 AM
Originally posted by Widowmaker214:
Next time you see him, shake his hand for all of us will you. Regardless of the side, these guys need to know that they havn't been forgotten.

Yes, I meant to say something along these lines as well. S!

cawimmer430
01-30-2007, 05:42 AM
Will do, guys. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

And I'll also ask a ton of questions. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_cool.gif

cawimmer430
01-30-2007, 05:42 AM
Originally posted by PB0_shadow:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> He didn't say much about his combat experiences, but it was on May 7, 1943 that he was captured together with remnants of his unit by a French Foreign Legion, which was led by a Russian and also included a couple of Germans who were fighting their fellow Germans, or so he said!

There were indeed Germans in the Foreign Legion fighting in africa against the Afrikakorps, among whom Hans Hartung (painter)

Nice story :-) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Very interesting. I suppose they were mostly anti-Nazis and Communists?

cawimmer430
01-30-2007, 05:45 AM
Originally posted by joeap:
Awesome story, I'd love to meet this fellow. A friend of mine from Germany told me about her grandfather who was in the Luftwaffe and flew as aircrew on Ju-52s delivering supplies to North Africa, and also hunting mines in the Baltic. (They flew low and had equipment to detonate magnetic mines) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif She didn't know that much as he only spoke of the war when he was in a "mood."

Really cool thing about this forum, and for me reading about German and Russian vet experiences (like FSPKLOR has posted) that I had little exposure to before.

Wow! That sounds like a dangerous job. Ju-52's weren't known for their defensive fire and flying across the Mediterranean to North Africa to deliver supplies sounds very risky. Glad this guy made it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

My grandmother worked at a Luftwaffe airfield in Moosburg during the war and she always saw bullet riddled Ju-52's coming in from the Eastern Front bringing in wounded soldiers etc. I don't think it was a fighter airfield though because she said the only planes on this airfield were mostly Ju-52's and Fieseler Storch's.

BillyTheKid_22
01-30-2007, 10:18 AM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by BillyTheKid_22:
http://okielegacy.org/image/powpittsburgcamp.jpg


German prisoner of war from Oklahoma.

www.okielegacy.org/WWIIpowcamps/powcamp2.html (http://www.okielegacy.org)

Thanks. Bookmarked the site. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>


Howdy!! Welcome!! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_smile.gif

NagaSadow84
01-30-2007, 04:43 PM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by PB0_shadow:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> He didn't say much about his combat experiences, but it was on May 7, 1943 that he was captured together with remnants of his unit by a French Foreign Legion, which was led by a Russian and also included a couple of Germans who were fighting their fellow Germans, or so he said!

There were indeed Germans in the Foreign Legion fighting in africa against the Afrikakorps, among whom Hans Hartung (painter)

Nice story :-) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Very interesting. I suppose they were mostly anti-Nazis and Communists? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

On a sidenote, the Afrika-Regiment 361 of the Afrika Korps was raised from former German members of the Foreign Legion.

cawimmer430
01-30-2007, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by NagaSadow84:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by PB0_shadow:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content"> He didn't say much about his combat experiences, but it was on May 7, 1943 that he was captured together with remnants of his unit by a French Foreign Legion, which was led by a Russian and also included a couple of Germans who were fighting their fellow Germans, or so he said!

There were indeed Germans in the Foreign Legion fighting in africa against the Afrikakorps, among whom Hans Hartung (painter)

Nice story :-) </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Very interesting. I suppose they were mostly anti-Nazis and Communists? </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

On a sidenote, the Afrika-Regiment 361 of the Afrika Korps was raised from former German members of the Foreign Legion. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Most interesting. http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_wink.gif

Have you heard of Sven Hassel? He has written several books about his supposed experiences in the German Army during World War II. A lot of people think he is a fraud of fake, but I still find his stories highly entertaining. The realism he describes is just amazing. One of the main characters in the novel is a guy simply referred to as "The Legionnaire". A German who fought with the French Foreign Legion in Africa.

Pirschjaeger
01-30-2007, 07:17 PM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by DxyFlyr:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by berg417448:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by cawimmer430:



BTW, is it true that German POW's were allowed to eat in diners or go to the movies in local towns or cities unescorted?


L

Yes...such things did sometimes happen. I recall reading about two German POWs who were working on a farm out west. The farmer became fond of them and actually allowed them to take his car to town one day! They acquired some alcohol and were pulled over by the Highway Patrol for drunk driving!


In Camp Clinton the ranking German POW officer had his own car driver assigned. It was said that he went to movies in town because it was the only air conditioned movie theater in the area!
http://mshistory.k12.ms.us/features/feature20/germanprisonersofwar.html

In some areas of the country the POWs actually had more food available to them than the civilian population due to rationing regulations. Seems strange but I've seen interviews of former POWs who confirmed it.

I'm sure that the treatment varied from camp to camp </div></BLOCKQUOTE>



There's another great story out of Camp Clinton. This camp held the majority of German captured high ranking officers. (Generals). The one you are referring to is Von Arnim, Rommel's replacement. There is a story of one General, I don't remember if it was Von Arnim or not, who left the camp in broad daylight in full uniform and walked into the city of Jackson. He intended to check in to a nice hotel and write a scathing letter of complaint about the deplorable conditions in his camp to the officials in Washington. He had two choices of fine hotels... The King Edward or the The Heidelberg. Guess which one he chose?

He did check in and write that letter on the hotel stationery. His complaints were laughable... being forced to share a cottage with another ranking officer. Then, having to share an aide with the same officer.

He then walked back to camp and checked himself in. The theory is that there were so many uniforms around Jackson at the time, that nobody recognised it as "enemy". </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

Sounds like a German general to me, especially PRUSSIAN! http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_razz.gif </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

As soon as I read this I thought of a guy I know from Berlin living in Franken. He's a little over 5ft tall, beer bellied, big mustache, and always complaining. He also hates it when I call him "Preussen Zeitler". http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/16x16_smiley-very-happy.gif

Pirschjaeger
01-30-2007, 07:26 PM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:
<BLOCKQUOTE class="ip-ubbcode-quote"><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-title">quote:</div><div class="ip-ubbcode-quote-content">Originally posted by joeap:
Awesome story, I'd love to meet this fellow. A friend of mine from Germany told me about her grandfather who was in the Luftwaffe and flew as aircrew on Ju-52s delivering supplies to North Africa, and also hunting mines in the Baltic. (They flew low and had equipment to detonate magnetic mines) http://forums.ubi.com/groupee_common/emoticons/icon_eek.gif She didn't know that much as he only spoke of the war when he was in a "mood."

Really cool thing about this forum, and for me reading about German and Russian vet experiences (like FSPKLOR has posted) that I had little exposure to before.

Wow! That sounds like a dangerous job. Ju-52's weren't known for their defensive fire and flying across the Mediterranean to North Africa to deliver supplies sounds very risky. Glad this guy made it. http://forums.ubi.com/images/smilies/25.gif

My grandmother worked at a Luftwaffe airfield in Moosburg during the war and she always saw bullet riddled Ju-52's coming in from the Eastern Front bringing in wounded soldiers etc. I don't think it was a fighter airfield though because she said the only planes on this airfield were mostly Ju-52's and Fieseler Storch's. </div></BLOCKQUOTE>

My friend's great uncle flew the last flight(Ju52) out of Stalingrad. For days he'd been flying out soldiers crammed into his plane. On his last flight, during taxiing, soldiers were trying to jump onto the wings. My friend told me that his uncle never got over knowing he had to leave so many behind and what their fate was.

PB0_shadow
01-31-2007, 02:57 AM
Originally posted by cawimmer430:

Very interesting. I suppose they were mostly anti-Nazis and Communists?

anti Nazis probably, communists not sure. Legion was weary of taking communists in the 30s, even in 39.... after '41, may have changed.

Marcel_Albert
02-03-2007, 01:44 AM
Interesting story .

Agreed PBOShadow , but during the war , i think they took whoever was fit and capable to be incorporated for the advanced training and war operations , it was certainly easier to join them than for example, the French squadrons of SAS who also operated in north Africa